Thread: Type 2 Engine

  1. #1
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    Default Type 2 Engine

    Does anyone have any experience with Type 2 Engines?

    The department I am with is entertaining the idea of purchasing a type 2 engine for the purposes of rapid attack and first responder response in an urban interface response area. The reason for this idea is we are a rural east Texas department with narrow "cow trails" that a motor grader has been driven down for county roads.
    The short wheel base of a class 5 cab over chassis, (i.e. Terra Star) would make it easier to turn off of these narrow roads onto the lanes/drive ways of the residence.
    The plan would be to forward lay LDH to the structure and attack with the water onboard. When the structural engine arrives on scene it can set up as a supply engine, draughting from either a nurse tender or a drop tank.
    The high gpm rate for the type 2 engine would allow for the engine to also play the roll of a supply engine as well when needed.

    Jeffrey

    "Plan for the worst and hope for the best!"

  2. #2
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    Default Rapid Attack

    Have you considered using CAFS for rapid attack?

    While you know the fire protection needs of your community better than I do, you may want to look into using CAFS for these situations. The use of CAFS can benefit your FD when water supplies are limited.

    I can see your concern about narrow roads and such. Sometimes large structures (McMansions, farm buildings, etc.) are built in rural areas and the roads are not suitable for large fire apparatus.

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    We have looked at CAF systems. All are problematic at some point or another. In speaking to the guys that fix the CAF systems, the EVT, they have not found a system that is "Firefighter Proof".

    I am not trying to offend, but we all know that at the end of an operation we are tired both physically and mentally and do not "tend to business" as we should. A prime example of this is to look at a hose load that was loaded after an extended operation. The foam systems on CAFS equipped and not equipped trucks have to be flushed properly after use. Even eductors mounted on discharges or in hose lines have to be flushed of the concetrate after use. The next time you need it the unit will not operate properly or just not work.

    We have even looked at water gel technology. About the safest to use is the Fire Ice gel system. All of the other systems, if operators are not properly trained or pay attention, can have catastrophic failures of the systems.
    Jeffrey

    "Plan for the worst, hope for the best!"

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    Default

    Don't know where you are but are you talking about a type 2 wildland? Hard to figure out sometimes because of different lingo. We have a unit that technically serves as a type 1, but was build for type 3 wildland response. We don't use it for a first out wildland but do use it as a first due to a structure do to amount of equipment it carries. Around here we don't see type 2 engines because you might as well make a type 1 with type 2/3 compliments. But the more you tailor your engine to somebody elses ideas and setups you'll quickly find out that you have an engine that is no good to you. If it serves as a type 2 then it will serve a type 3 or 1 with the right changes. just my opinion.

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    I appreciate your response and opinion.

    The reason I asked this question is I am in rural east Texas. We have alot of narrow county roads and lanes leading to the homes and structures. We are trying to figure out if a fire engine set up in a type two configuration would be beneficial to our department.

    By type 2 I am refering to a wildland/urban interface, (1000gpm pump and a 500 gal. tank) on a class five, cab over chassis.

    The tasks asked of the engine would be in this order, medical first responder, wildland and attack/supply engine depending on situation.

    Looking at a type one engine we felt that it would be too big and heavy for the role it would be playing. A type three truck does not have the pump capacity to act in the role of attack/supply engine.
    Jeffrey

    "Plan for the worst, hope for the best!"

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    Default

    Here we have some neighborhoods around the lake that have very narrow roads (mostly summer cottages) that we can not get a standard pumper down. The solution we have is using our brush truck (F-550 single cab, 500 gal water) as our primary pumper, with one of our regular pumpers on the main road as a supply truck.

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    Default

    We've used Type 2 engines on Wildland structure protection assignments before.

    Short wheelbase, narrow truck, made getting into some properties easier.

    Engine had a 750gpm 2 stage pump and a 500 gallon tank, carried a crew of 3.

    Honestly, the truck wasn't built with that in mind though. It was built in 1972 with the idea that the Officer and Engineer would be in the cab and 3 or 4 others would be on the tailboards. Had big wide tailboards.

    Replaced it this years with a hybrid interface engine. Type-wise, it is a Type 5 because it only has a two person crew, but it has a 500gal tank, 750 gpm pump, 1000 ft of 5', full complement of ladders. Won't be used for interior attack, but will be used in the interface around our community

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    Cool Our Type 3 Engines

    Our CA Type 3s would suit your needs very well. They're manufactured by BME (Boise Mobile Equipment) and you can get most of the specs off their website.

    The specs are listed on BME's "Wildland/Urban Interface Pumper." We upgraded our pump to a 1,000 gpm pump. It allows us to use it as a Type 1 (Structure) as well as a Type 3 (Brush Engine). We have a portable monitor to meet the needs for the heavy master stream for the Type 1 requirement.

    Apparently, they can defy gravity also..... LOL. Dunno how it keeps adding the attachment upside down.
    Last edited by mikeyboy; 03-18-2011 at 12:39 AM.
    "Be LOUD, Be PROUD..... It just might save your can someday when goin' through an intersection!!!!!"

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