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    Default Grade 80 rescue Chain

    A student came up to me and asked what standard says Grade 80 chain is "rescue grade."

    I'm aware that grade 80 is lifting/hoisting chain and we all know it's the minimum grade used for rescue, but what authority or standard (if any) says this?

    If you have any information, please let me know. Thanks!
    John E. Burruss, NREMT-P
    Heavy-Technical Rescue Instructor
    Virginia Department of Fire Programs

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    Grade 80 is rated for overhead lifting which i think is why it is also "rescue" chain.

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    John,If you DIG long enough into the Federal standards I think there was a SHORT section on it SOMEWHERE, As stated earlier,and you know,80 is the MINIMUM allowed for overhead lifting. I believe that's why it is used for "Rescue" chain.And now there is 100 and 120 Grade chain. Choose your Poison,in over 40 years of Towing and recovery,I've NEVER broken a 43(Hi Test)chain that was rated for what I was pulling. Basic knowledge of loads and resistance factors is REQUIRED BEFORE using ANY chain. You and I have been over this time and again but it is a good reminder for the rest. So I would be REAL comfortable with ANY chain 80 and above as long as the WLL was equal to or greater that the load I was rigging. Same story with synthetics.AND NO sharps with synthetics. T.C.

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    Hey John,

    I have searched every resource I have at my disposal and I can not find a single reference to rescue chain, rescue chain assembly, or similar in any printed standard that suggest a grade or WLL of said chain.

    The closest was NFPA 1670 that discusses a "Rescue Chain Assembly" but fails to define it anywhere within the document.

    Of course there is the ever present OSHA requirement for Chain Slings & overhead lifting along with some FMCSA standard on chain requirements for securing loads (which oddly enough allow for various grades based on the weight & type of load).

    You are much more the expert in this field than I am but so far my research is leading me to believe that this is either another "urban legend" of sorts in the Rescue community. Something that is based in fact & good practice that has drifted in as "law" because that's what we were told / taught and have in turn "taught the way we were taught".

    That and the fact that we Rescue types like to travel light & still be prepared for anything may have led to the thinking that "If we only carry & use Grade 80 then we can do anything we'll be faced with and only have to carry 1 chain" and somewhere along the way this magically became a "standard".

    If you (or anyone else) comes across an explanation or answer for this one, I would love to hear it as well.
    Take Care - Stay Safe - God Bless
    Stephen
    FF/Paramedic
    Instructor

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    You wanna travel light and be prepared,look at the 100 or 120 chain. That's some GOOD stuff and easy to carry. Impressive load ratings. T.C.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rescue101 View Post
    You wanna travel light and be prepared,look at the 100 or 120 chain. That's some GOOD stuff and easy to carry. Impressive load ratings. T.C.
    I have and you are correct they are impressive, however I can't get my little department to buy some hook clusters to go with the chains we have now - I'll never talk them into that stuff.

    I am still holding high hopes that as I keep pushing our County oversight agency to develop a true Medium to Heavy rescue that I can put some of these chains in our equipment cache.
    Take Care - Stay Safe - God Bless
    Stephen
    FF/Paramedic
    Instructor

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    I feel your pain. I don't have 'em either but it's NICE stuff. Gives ya something to look forward to though. T.c.

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    I find the biggest problem with chain is personal not being educated.


    I'm going to touch on a few things.

    for the most part, chains should have just one hook on them, that will allow the user to use a chain at its strongest

    also, chain ratings decrease in regards to how much surface area the chain covers at point of contact. What I'm saying if you have a 5/8 Crosby grade 80 spectrum chain. it has a SWL of 18,000 lbs in a straight configuration as bench tested... one must have a certain number of links around whatever you are rigging to just to get that rating.


    Check the credentials of whomever you are getting advise/knowledge in regards to rigging, there are allot of "self-proclaimed" experts/trainers that have in reality little to no knowledge in regards to practical/proper use of rigging. If I offended a few of you by the statement (you know who you are), I'm sorry, but I've seen allot of bad rigging go wrong over a very long career, allot of it was due to the fact that people had bad information given to them or shown dangerous rigging techniques at training classes.

    bad advice can kill someone.

    If anyone is interested, i have contact info for a few Crosby certified trainers who have a wealth of practical field knowledge in regards to this topic.
    Last edited by scooby0066; 06-07-2010 at 08:05 AM.

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    Well, I'm NOT "Crosby trained" but I probably use as much of this stuff as often as the trainers do. And since my LIFE depends on what I do,I'm PRETTY comfortable in offering advise in these areas. There are MANY of us in industry able to offer FD's GOOD advise in these areas WITHOUT a bunch of "paper". And I have PLENTY of "paper". Not bad advise but you DO NOT have to be Crosby trained to KNOW product and use. While they make good product there are a few other suppliers of QUALITY equipment,Gunnebo-Johnson just to name one.Several good chain suppliers as well. I try very hard as a trainer NOT to get brand specfic,rather focus on QUALITY and proper use. Just another view. T.C.

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    TJ, apparently you do not read the entire statement. I said the following:

    If anyone is interested, i have contact info for a few Crosby certified trainers who have a wealth of practical field knowledge in regards to this topic.

    These individuals have a few different training credentials, some you probably wouldn't even know off, and they are also Crosby trainers. You are correct, there are a few credible organizations that teach rigging. I simply chose Crosby.

    Your comment "I try very hard not to be brand specific...when it comes to rigging", I can only think of a handful of manufacturers I would purchase rigging from, so why not name them all! It will only take a extra minute. there's allot of offshore crap out there. My alloy blocks are a couple grand each....I carry 14 of them. I'm proud to say they are Crosby. I also have all my rigging tagged with in date service, manufacturer batch number and so on.

    I take calls all the time from individuals who want to be involved with teaching. They tell me they are a current instructor for rescue. they have been in the fire service for 20 years. I'll ask them how many verifiable lifts they have done in the field...they tell me they have been in the fire service for 20 years... the end result is, they have no practical in the field lifts. Some actually have ZERO.

    Is it wrong to ask a trainer for their credentials? Anyone attending a class and putting down some $$ to do so, should ask for a detailed resume of the trainers.

    I'll stand by my statement. Many who think they know allot about rigging, in reality don't. I know this because I do allot of traveling and conducting courses. Its not easy telling a class we can't safely lift something because the tower doesn't have the proper rigging for the lift. The common response is.."well I've done this for 20 years and we did this lift a few months back and it all worked out OK". Overloading rigging is like a paperclip, your only going to bend it so many times before it fails. One should never assume that because they have done something for 20 years...they have done it correctly.

    I feel the Internet is a good source for finding out where to go to obtain info, not to find it and follow it as the bible. Sadly even the trade magazines, take firehouse magazine, have had articles written about rigging by "leading authorities" in rescue, but are incorrect.

    In a nut shell, all I'm saying is people need to educate themselves by reputable, accountable sources. I frequently attend classes to keep my rigging certifications up. Am I the best rigger out there...I'm sure there are better, but I know where to resource the info I need to rig correctly.

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    Guess I'm NOT the only one with reading dyslexia. It's TC NOT TJ. I KNOW about Crosby,I carry WM certs. There are MORE than a handful of QUALITY suppliers of Rigging equipment but what do I know,I ONLY do it every day for a living. I own a Towing and Recovery company,am on my 42nd year in the Fire service(not that that matters)have attended about every school on Heavy Rescue you can mention,EXTENSIVELY Skilled/Schooled in winching and compound blocking, and a few other skills ad nauseum. While "book"knowledge in rigging and vehicle moving is indeed valuable NOTHING beats field trials where everything isn't as pristine as it is on the training ground. THIS is where I operate, in the AFTERMATH. FAILURE is NOT an option,lives(including mine)are in the balance. And you MAY not have every tidbit you would like to get the job done. In the pure sense,you are correct. At the FD level,a lot of field knowledge can be taught to Fire crews WITHOUT getting into high level rigging,they can do that as an anvanced class.Gotta start somewhere.T.C.

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    tc..I must have had the jeep (a tj) on my mind..lol

    I think you can appreciate my concerns.

    Why people don't demand better is beyond me. I know I do, not only of the others on the team but that of myself.

    There's simply allot of bad informtion out there. I don't want to see anyone get hurt.

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    I checked your stats. You're one of the Good guys. Wish I had NY's money,I still run mechanical rigs for the most part. Which, in turn, makes me appreciate good Rigging more. I have to do more of it to get the job done. There isn't that kind of money ANYWHERE in Maine to float 14 $2K blocks. With the modern day hydraulics,most of the rigs I see around here MIGHT have two blocks,only the OLD established outfits will have more. My guys have a good rudementary skill set for getting the basics done. The only winches in the dept are either hand winches or belong to me. The guys will help rig,crib and work the bags. The control isn't pulled until the layout is checked and rechecked. Same with a bag lift. There are about 8 members who are proficient at figuring the loads,we are continually working on that but it isn't as exciting as a structure Fire. We started integrating Fire and Towing LONG before it became the rage,I think we started in about 1978. Until 1983-4,my Towing company did the Extrications. So we've been at it for awhile. Still learning,still educating. And what the hell is a Tj jeep? I'm Familiar with the CJ's but don't think I've ever seen a Tj. T.C.

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    Ooops I lied. TJ,Joke jeep,yuppy Jeep,etc. I'll keep my Super Duty,I can put a TJ in the back. They stopped building true Jeeps back in the early 70's,the new ones are a joke,unless you do a BUNCH of mods. T.C.

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