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  1. #41
    55 Years & Still Rolling hwoods's Avatar
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    Post And.........

    With 4 (Yeah, Four) Levels of Field Providers, we don't usually have a problem with having someone with a certain skill level O/S in a short time. Our older guys, (Joined prior to 1990) Had to have First Responder, or EMT-A. Anyone joining after 1990 had to become an EMT-A. EMT-A later became EMT-B. Maryland also had a "Cardiac Rescue Technician" which has become EMT-I. Then there is the Top of the pile, EMT-P. There are active members out there who still only have First Responder, There is a Majority who are EMT-B (including me) Some EMT-Is and a good Crew of EMT-Ps. I don't see this mix changing dramatically anytime soon, except that as the older folks who are First Responders fade out the "First Responder Level of Care will disappear.

    Back to the O.P........... We really don't do much more than AED, Pulse OX, Epi Pens, etc. Vent and so forth is for Is and Ps...... This seems to work OK for us.
    Never use Force! Get a Bigger Hammer.
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    Chief Earle W. Woods, 1912 - 1997
    Asst. Chief John R. Woods Sr. 1937 - 2006

    IACOJ Budget Analyst

    I Refuse to be a Spectator. If I come to the Game, I'm Playing.

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  2. #42
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    Thanks for the input Chief.

  3. #43
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    So what separates an EMT-A from an EMT-B?

  4. #44
    Forum Member DeputyMarshal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LaFireEducator View Post
    So what separates an EMT-A from an EMT-B?
    It might be different by jurisdiction but, at the DOT level, it was just a change in terminology. When I was originally certified, it was as an EMT-A(mbulance) but a few recerts later the level magically changed to EMT-B(asic).
    "Nemo Plus Voluptatis Quam Nos Habant"

    The Code is more what you'd call "guidelines" than actual rules.

  5. #45
    MembersZone Subscriber tree68's Avatar
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    And now EMT-D (for defribilation)...

    NY has five levels.
    CFR
    EMT-D
    AEMT-I (Advanced EMT - Intermediate)
    AEMT-CC (Critical Care)
    Paramedic.

    CFR, basic, and paramedic are pretty much the same as everywhere else. Basics are being allowed Epipens, aspirin, and glucose monitoring on a case-by-case basis. Few, if any, have any other invasive procedures available.

    Intermediates can tube, shock, and start IV's but are expected to be hooking up with ALS enroute. I believe they were originally intended to serve as "trauma techs."

    CC's can do just about anything a paramedic can do, but while the medics have standing orders for just about everything, CC's have to have an order from medical control for a number of meds, especially narcotics.

    Intermediates (as defined in NY) are a dying breed.

    CC's provided a much needed bridge between BLS and ALS in NY when paramedic programs were few and far between. Their number is dwindling as well, but many volunteer agencies still rely on them for their ALS capability.

    NY is also run by regional organizations which do everything from determining protocols and med lists to authorizing agencies to operate.
    Opinions my own. Standard disclaimers apply.

    Everyone goes home. Safety begins with you.

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by LaFireEducator View Post
    So what separates an EMT-A from an EMT-B?
    Originally NREMT classified EMTs as EMT-A and EMT-non A, or Ambulance\non-Ambulance..
    EMTs that worked on an ambulance were EMT-A, and everyone else was EMT-non A, such as fire fighters, ER techs, funeral home workers,...
    In the late '80s they changed the classification to EMT-B, with the Enhanced tag (AED, IV, ET\EOA,..).

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