1. #51
    Forum Member
    FiremanLyman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    948

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rm1524 View Post
    Copy. Thank you. We just set our alarm clock. If for some reason someone hasn't got up by 10 till we wake them.
    Not got up by 10? Someone is going to get fired from their second job!
    ~Drew
    Firefighter/EMT/Technical Rescue
    USAR TF Rescue Specialist

  2. #52
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    SW Missouri
    Posts
    1,156

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FiremanLyman View Post
    Not got up by 10? Someone is going to get fired from their second job!
    10 till (6:50)

  3. #53
    Forum Member
    mtg55's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    1,313

    Default

    Best of luck Mike. The best officers are the ones who can take critizism and use it to better themselfs. Kudos bro
    Matt G.
    Battalion Chief
    IACOJ-Member
    FTM-PTB

  4. #54
    MembersZone Subscriber
    fieldseng2's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
    Posts
    826

    Default

    What I've learned the most from officers I've been around..... How NOT to act, and how NOT to treat the people under your command.

    But I must say that is pretty stand up of you to come back on here and say you were wrong, and what you plan to do to rectify it. That is the making of a good officer.

    Treat the people under your command with respect, accept input from them, praise them when they do a good job, don't berate or humiliate them when their actions are less than acceptable....rather explain what they did wrong and explain what you expect in the future, when there is work to be done (in the firehouse or on the scene) get your hands dirty too, be firm and confident when you make a decision....you get the idea....LEAD in this fashion and your crew will follow you in the depths of he!! w/a water can...LEAD in this fashion and you will very rarely will have to give an order....LEAD in this fashion and they will make you look like the best officer in the whole department, they will defend you whenever an outsider crticizes you...

    Isnt that what every officer wants?

  5. #55
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael232 View Post
    A quick intro about me: I joined a major metropolitan fire department when I was 30. After 6 years, I promoted to Lieutenant. A long time friend and ex-Deputy Fire Chief met up with me after I promoted to Lieutenant and wanted to share some of his advice he gathered throughout the years. To make a long, long story short...I learned so much through our conversation and took it to my team at the firehouse. I've since moved on to a different station and my new team seems to be slightly upset about the way I "run" things.

    Do you think this is too much to ask for out of my team?
    Wait a minute... You've been in a major CAREER department for 6 YEARS and promoted to Lieutenant and you're just learning this after talking to two chiefs??

    Except for showing up 1 1/2 hours early and demanding 45 second response times I learned most of that after less than 6 months on a volunteer fire department. wow.

  6. #56
    Forum Member
    CaptOldTimer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 1999
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    7,256

    Exclamation

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael232 View Post
    A quick intro about me: I joined a major metropolitan fire department when I was 30. After 6 years, I promoted to Lieutenant. A long time friend and ex-Deputy Fire Chief met up with me after I promoted to Lieutenant and wanted to share some of his advice he gathered throughout the years. To make a long, long story short...I learned so much through our conversation and took it to my team at the firehouse. I've since moved on to a different station and my new team seems to be slightly upset about the way I "run" things.

    Do you think this is too much to ask for out of my team?

    1. I expect my team to arrive at the Firehouse no later than 0530 (we run "traditional" 0700-0700 shifts). I, personally, believe it takes at least an hour and a half to do a THOROUGH and COMPLETE check of EVERY SINGLE piece of equipment on our engine. When my team and I go in service at 0700, I expect to be able to respond to ANY call with COMPLETE assurance that our engine is 100% ready to rock-and-roll. There are a couple of firefighters that say it's "unreasonable" and "crazy" to show up at 0530.

    2. Our station answers a lot of Automatic Alarms. I expect my team to gear up COMPLETELY (bunkers, SCBA, Irons, thermal cams, etc) on EVERY AFA call. I've seen other companies who just respond in regular station wear. I think it's 100% unacceptable. There have been times where crews respond to a "routine" AFA and find a working fire...only to gear up on-scene. Jesus Christ...this is our JOB to RESPOND and be PREPARED to rock-and-roll. That "routine" AFA could be THE time. It could be THAT fire where that little kid is trapped. It's our job to respond and be prepared to act.

    3. I've noticed some crews that will take 1-2 minutes to turn-out on one of those "routine" MVAs or EMS runs. I expect my team to be (from the second of the tones) ON THE ROAD in 45 seconds day or night. Some say it's crazy to be in such a hurry. I've heard..."Mike, it's just a medical emergency. Why do you want us to run to the engine?". Again, it's our JOB and DUTY to respond in a FAST manner. Just because Locution says "Fall" or "Headache" doesn't mean it's not serious. I've seen "Gun Shot Wounds" turn into nosebleeds and "Medical Emergencies" turn into to confirmed chokings.

    4. I expect my team to buckle up. Every ride. Every time.

    5. I expect ALL our EMS bags to go in on EVERY EMS call. I expect our airway kit, AED, and general EMS bag to go in on EVERY call.

    6. Anytime we have an overtime firefighter or new rookie, I expect to sit down with them and have the infamous "BST" (as my team calls it). It's the Big Safety Talk. I explain to them that safety is EVERYONE'S responsibility. I expect ANY team member to speak up if they think something is dangerous. I explain that there is ABSOLUTELY nothing wrong with speaking up when you think something is dangerous. Whether it's a rook telling me that he thinks what I'm doing is dangerous...or me telling a driver that he's driving dangerously. There is NO barrier when it comes to safety.



    Is that really THAT much to ask for? I'm not laid back. I don't mess around. I've got a job to do with 100% of my effort! I've had people get upset with what I expect and even one firefighter leave the house for a reassignment because he didn't like my "rules".




    Son, let me lay this on you.
    I was on the job for 40 years plus.
    I relieved as my relief man wanted to be.

    Normally when I was an firefighter and officer, I was in the fire house about 6 AM. Why? Because that is when my relief man wasted to be relieved.

    When I rode the Battalion Car, I was at the Battatlion Office no later than 5:45 AM to sit down with the off going chief and go over the past days work. I was also relieved the next morning by this same chief or another, on a different shirt and we went over my past day.

    I never ordered any of my members to be in 1 to 1-1/2 hours prior to normal shift change and in no way would I have ordered anyone to report for duty in the fire house at 5:30 AM. or 0530 which ever you know the best!

    You are a dictator my friend and I am surprised someone hasn't preferred charges on you!
    Stay Safe and Well Out There....

    Always remembering 9-11-2001 and 343+ Brothers

  7. #57
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    57

    Default

    ...............
    Last edited by shmarleybarlow; 11-05-2010 at 02:32 PM.

  8. #58
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    57

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BW21 View Post
    From one Lt to another,

    I'd chill the f*** out. I think you lack something called Brotherhood.

    Instead of influencing the further loss of brotherhood in the fire service start building it back up with your crew.
    quote......

  9. #59
    Forum Member
    FyredUp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 1999
    Location
    Rural Wisconsin, Retired from the burbs of Milwaukee
    Posts
    10,169

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael232 View Post
    A quick intro about me: I joined a major metropolitan fire department when I was 30. After 6 years, I promoted to Lieutenant. A long time friend and ex-Deputy Fire Chief met up with me after I promoted to Lieutenant and wanted to share some of his advice he gathered throughout the years. To make a long, long story short...I learned so much through our conversation and took it to my team at the firehouse. I've since moved on to a different station and my new team seems to be slightly upset about the way I "run" things.

    Do you think this is too much to ask for out of my team?

    1. I expect my team to arrive at the Firehouse no later than 0530 (we run "traditional" 0700-0700 shifts). I, personally, believe it takes at least an hour and a half to do a THOROUGH and COMPLETE check of EVERY SINGLE piece of equipment on our engine. When my team and I go in service at 0700, I expect to be able to respond to ANY call with COMPLETE assurance that our engine is 100% ready to rock-and-roll. There are a couple of firefighters that say it's "unreasonable" and "crazy" to show up at 0530.

    Not a snowball's chance in Hell am I showing up an hour and a half before my shift starts and frankly good luck if you try to push the issue. I will show up roughly a half hour before my shift starts and I most often do that as a favor for the guy going off duty because he has to get home for his kids.

    If it takes an hour and a half for a crew to check over a rig I would first of all question their familiarization with the rig and their skills with the equipment they are checking.

    It is absolutely unreasonable and crazy to expect people to show up to work 90 minutes early and go to work unpaid for those 90 minutes. You can choose to start whenever you want. I am sure the off going LT loves going home that early. Unless the guy I relieve is coming in for me at 0530 tomorrow morning it simply isn't going to happen.


    2. Our station answers a lot of Automatic Alarms. I expect my team to gear up COMPLETELY (bunkers, SCBA, Irons, thermal cams, etc) on EVERY AFA call. I've seen other companies who just respond in regular station wear. I think it's 100% unacceptable. There have been times where crews respond to a "routine" AFA and find a working fire...only to gear up on-scene. Jesus Christ...this is our JOB to RESPOND and be PREPARED to rock-and-roll. That "routine" AFA could be THE time. It could be THAT fire where that little kid is trapped. It's our job to respond and be prepared to act.

    Perfectly logical. Full PPE and SCBA on the back, facepiece in the ready position but not donned. When the rig I respond on gets an automatic alarm I carry my pickhead axe, 6 foot FDNY roof hook, and a 2 1/2 gallon water extinguisher, my officer carries the irons, tick and search rope. We are ready to go to work in the event we find something.

    3. I've noticed some crews that will take 1-2 minutes to turn-out on one of those "routine" MVAs or EMS runs. I expect my team to be (from the second of the tones) ON THE ROAD in 45 seconds day or night. Some say it's crazy to be in such a hurry. I've heard..."Mike, it's just a medical emergency. Why do you want us to run to the engine?". Again, it's our JOB and DUTY to respond in a FAST manner. Just because Locution says "Fall" or "Headache" doesn't mean it's not serious. I've seen "Gun Shot Wounds" turn into nosebleeds and "Medical Emergencies" turn into to confirmed chokings.

    45 seconds in the middle of the night seems a little unrealistic to me. One minute seems more realistic to me.

    4. I expect my team to buckle up. Every ride. Every time.

    Agreed. IF, you allow them to pack up before you roll or give them time to pack up once on scene.

    5. I expect ALL our EMS bags to go in on EVERY EMS call. I expect our airway kit, AED, and general EMS bag to go in on EVERY call.

    If you are lone dogging it, or the Barf Box is far out, then of course. Otherwise all it is is additional clutter.

    6. Anytime we have an overtime firefighter or new rookie, I expect to sit down with them and have the infamous "BST" (as my team calls it). It's the Big Safety Talk. I explain to them that safety is EVERYONE'S responsibility. I expect ANY team member to speak up if they think something is dangerous. I explain that there is ABSOLUTELY nothing wrong with speaking up when you think something is dangerous. Whether it's a rook telling me that he thinks what I'm doing is dangerous...or me telling a driver that he's driving dangerously. There is NO barrier when it comes to safety.

    It sounds like you want to establish policy that goes above and beyond that of the fire department. Having that talk with a 10 year veteran on overtime versus a brand new rookie may earn you the reutation of a micromanager, not a good leader.


    Is that really THAT much to ask for? I'm not laid back. I don't mess around. I've got a job to do with 100% of my effort! I've had people get upset with what I expect and even one firefighter leave the house for a reassignment because he didn't like my "rules".

    I am surprised honestly that someone hasn't brought you up on charges for demanding they be in by 0530. What would you do if a member of your crew looked at you and said "NO WAY am I coming in 90 minutes early simply because you say you want me to."

    You sound like a micromanaging, dictatorial, perfectionist. I am very much into my job, I check my rig over thoroughly, I maintain the tools on the rig, I am involved in the apparatus and Health and Safety Committees, I enjoy training and I am always looking for more opportunities to learn. My refusing to come in ridiculously early has nothing to do with my dedication to the job it has to do with what is right and your demands are not right.
    A long time ago I heard a firefighter tell a story of what he said to his new officer when he made unrealistic demands on his crew and followed it up with the "There is no I in team speech." He looked across the table and said "You are right sir, there is no I in team, but there is a U in Nut."

    My advice lighten up a bit. Don't expect people to be as consumed by the job as you are. AND... if you seriously believe it takes an hour and a half to check out a rig in the morning then schedule the time to do it during regular working hours.

    Good luck.
    Crazy, but that's how it goes
    Millions of people living as foes
    Maybe it's not too late
    To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

  10. #60
    Forum Member
    nyckftbl's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    On a Hill, overlooking George's Kingdom
    Posts
    2,579

    Default

    Guys read the f*ckin thread....it was resolved already.
    Proud East Coast Traditionalist.

  11. #61
    Forum Member
    FyredUp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 1999
    Location
    Rural Wisconsin, Retired from the burbs of Milwaukee
    Posts
    10,169

    Default

    Nice follow up to your first post. I still see some issues, but improvement if you follow through.


    Quote Originally Posted by Michael232 View Post
    Don't get me wrong...I have been reading the responses so far. I do appreciate the constructive advice I've gotten from here.

    I see that for the most part, people agree with some of the expectations I layed out except for the turnout-times and reporting times.

    After thinking through the turnout expectations and talking with some fellow LTs, I've realized that 45 seconds in unreasonable. Our station is not large, nor is it a 2-story...however, even with that, 45 seconds is pushing it. I will say this, however, our station has a different mindset on turnout times for boxes vs EMS calls.

    So does almost everywhere. Let's face it, it may not be right but the adrenaline surges more for a fire than an EMS call.

    About the reporting times, I've also talked with the guys and apologized about setting an unreasonable time to show up. Our Locution dispatch system automatically plays the tones at 0600 as an alarm to wake up. Most of the guys show up at 0600 anyways to chat with the previous crew or have a cup of coffee together.

    And that is cool IF that is what your guys want to do.

    Addressing the question of why it takes an hour and a half (for me, at least) to check the engine: I personally believe in checking equipment like our lives depend on it (because it does). It sounds depressing (I know)...but I pretty much check every piece of equipment out 100% and make sure it's in the correct place. As it is...our station runs a lot of EMS and by the end of the day, it's uncommon for the bag to be messy from things being thrown in there. It takes me at least half an hour just to organize the EMS bag and make sure that all the supplies are stocked and in the right position. We are a paramedic engine so there is a little bit more equipment then say...in a BLS bag.

    Okay, this is still an issue for me. I think you are a micromanager that doesn't trust your guys. You don't need to check everything on the rig, if you do then why have your crew do it? I would take you following behind me and checking everything as an insult because clearly you don't trust me. My previous Captain trusted my knowledge of the rig and its equipment so thoroughly that he would ask me when I came back from vacation what my replacement or the other crews had lost or put back wrong and believe it or not I would invariably find 2 or 3 things out of place. THAT is how you build trust, byt trusting your troops, not micromanaging them.

    I thoroughly check the rig on the first day of the cycle. I check all the saws, power equipment, gas meter, hose beds and so forth. If I talk with the off going crew over the rest of the cycle and they didn't use anything I am not going to run every piece of power equipment every day. My 2nd and 3rd days checks, also completed on day 1, are the med bags, the O2 kits, the defib, the suction, my SCBA, spare cylinders and all the compartments to see if everything is in place and/or it needs service.


    From the responses I've got here, I think portrayed myself as a d***. If so, please accept my sincere apologies. I do realize that some of my expectations were indeed, unreasonable. In addition, taking on the suggestion of one post, I'm planning on buying dinner for OUR (not "my") crew.

    Make sure you buy ice cream or pie or both to go with that dinner.

    On a final note, after talking with some other Officers and reading what Deputy Chief Gonzo put, I'm going to do some of the "lowly" jobs around the house. I realize that being an officer is not a pass to not to any work. Before now, it was my expectation that a FF would carry our ALS EMS bag or AED. I'm helping to carry the EMS equipment now to show my crew that I'm still with them.

    That has never been a question with my boss, the house Captain. If we are washing trucks he is there helping, if we are washing hose, reloading hose, taking care of equipment he is right there with us. To be sure when he needs us to step up for him we are far more willing because he is still one of us when there is dirty work to do.

    I made a mistake when I moved to this new house by laying out the expectations the way I did. I made a mistake. Luckily for me, however, I do work with a great, great group of guys that are still willing to give me a shot.

    Well, you are darn lucky there. Don't screw it up again because they won't be so forgiving the second time around.

    Thanks for the replies.
    Good luck and I seriously hope you did take what people said to heart. If you didn't your career is going to be long and very painful emotionally.
    Crazy, but that's how it goes
    Millions of people living as foes
    Maybe it's not too late
    To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

  12. #62
    Forum Member
    nyckftbl's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    On a Hill, overlooking George's Kingdom
    Posts
    2,579

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FyredUp View Post
    Nice follow up to your first post. I still see some issues, but improvement if you follow through.




    Good luck and I seriously hope you did take what people said to heart. If you didn't your career is going to be long and very painful emotionally.
    BTW Fyred my comment wasnt towards you...
    Proud East Coast Traditionalist.

  13. #63
    Forum Member
    FyredUp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 1999
    Location
    Rural Wisconsin, Retired from the burbs of Milwaukee
    Posts
    10,169

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nyckftbl View Post
    BTW Fyred my comment wasnt towards you...
    We're good Brother
    Crazy, but that's how it goes
    Millions of people living as foes
    Maybe it's not too late
    To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

  14. #64
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    165

    Default

    unfortunately the "Niedermier" syndrome is common in 5 year wonders. He'll either "get it" the easy way, or his troops will "get it" for him.

    I worked for a capt once who made up for his incompetence on the street by showing some of those very same behaviors in the fire house.

  15. #65
    Forum Member
    FyredUp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 1999
    Location
    Rural Wisconsin, Retired from the burbs of Milwaukee
    Posts
    10,169

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ffp20 View Post
    unfortunately the "Niedermier" syndrome is common in 5 year wonders. He'll either "get it" the easy way, or his troops will "get it" for him.

    I worked for a capt once who made up for his incompetence on the street by showing some of those very same behaviors in the fire house.

    Damn straight biscuit!

    I have experienced that on both the career and volly side of this business.
    Crazy, but that's how it goes
    Millions of people living as foes
    Maybe it's not too late
    To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

  16. #66
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    1

    Default

    Calm down Captain America.

  17. #67
    MembersZone Subscriber
    ffbam24's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,482

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HRFRD_7 View Post
    Calm down Captain America.
    Nice first post to resurrect a 2 month old thread.

  18. #68
    Forum Member
    FiremanLyman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    948

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ffbam24 View Post
    Nice first post to resurrect a 2 month old thread.
    Quick boys, get the bat, this horse twitched, just a little more to ensure it has sufficiently been beat to death.
    ~Drew
    Firefighter/EMT/Technical Rescue
    USAR TF Rescue Specialist

  19. #69
    MembersZone Subscriber
    ffbam24's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,482

    Default

    Muahahahaha! Liiiiiive!

    Funny too. I don't recall what the thread was about.

  20. #70
    Forum Member
    dfwfirefighter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    The Lone Star State
    Posts
    350

    Default

    I've enjoyed reading the posts in this thread. Although most of how I handle business has already been said in many of these posts, I've made a short list, in no particular order, of how to be a productive member of your department:

    1. Know and do your job.

    2. Arrive at work on time.

    3. Inspect and maintain your equipment as though your life depends on it - because it does.

    4. Respect and take care of each other.

    5. If someone in your company/station/crew needs help (i.e. a nudge in the right direction, a "pep talk", and/or etc.), take him/her under your wing and help them. How they perform is a direct reflection of your crew or station's personnel.

    6. Everyone (on some level) wants to be led by capable leadership. If you are an officer, LEAD. Your people are expecting you to!

    7. No one should work alone. If the driver is washing his/her apparatus, everyone should be out there helping. This goes for cleaning the station, inspecting fire hydrants, and etc. Put down the iphone and build relationships with those you work with.

    8. Eat meals together (regardless of whether you rotate cooking or bring your own food).

    9. Safety is non-negotiable. (Side-note to officers - It is hard "sell" to promote the "do as I say; not as I do" mentality while expecting compliance with your FFs. Wear your PPE as you'd expect your people to).

    10. Train every shift on something. This could be as simple as reviewing an incident during a meal (see #8), going out to the fire academy training tower, or setting the aerial in a parking lot somewhere on the weekends.

    11. As an add-on on to item #1: Know not only your job, but also the job below you and the one above you, i.e. a company officer should be able to operate a pump and/or aerial device AND ride up as the BC. It is hard to mentor your folks if you do not know how to do your job (and theirs).
    DFW



    "There's no such thing as a free lunch."

  21. #71
    Forum Member
    backsteprescue123's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    4,318

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael232 View Post
    A quick intro about me: I joined a major metropolitan fire department when I was 30. After 6 years, I promoted to Lieutenant. A long time friend and ex-Deputy Fire Chief met up with me after I promoted to Lieutenant and wanted to share some of his advice he gathered throughout the years. To make a long, long story short...I learned so much through our conversation and took it to my team at the firehouse. I've since moved on to a different station and my new team seems to be slightly upset about the way I "run" things.

    Do you think this is too much to ask for out of my team?

    1. I expect my team to arrive at the Firehouse no later than 0530 (we run "traditional" 0700-0700 shifts). I, personally, believe it takes at least an hour and a half to do a THOROUGH and COMPLETE check of EVERY SINGLE piece of equipment on our engine. When my team and I go in service at 0700, I expect to be able to respond to ANY call with COMPLETE assurance that our engine is 100% ready to rock-and-roll. There are a couple of firefighters that say it's "unreasonable" and "crazy" to show up at 0530.

    I try to make it to the station between 0615 and 0630... any later and I feel bad for being late. Not only do I not want anyone to get the shaft by getting stuck on a late run but I like getting in, throwing my gear on the rig and letting someone take off if they need to go to another job and sitting down with the offgoing crew for breakfast. Once dispatch comes over the air and says "0700 hours", we get up and go check out the rigs. Being there at 0530 seems pretty ridiculous to me too. And like others said, if the rig isn't ready to roll regardless of whether you check it or not, there's a problem. Now everyone mumbles and grumbles about how "(insert letter or number here) shift never does their station duties or checks their trucks out" but that truck should be good to go and thats why we check it out right at 0700.

    2. Our station answers a lot of Automatic Alarms. I expect my team to gear up COMPLETELY (bunkers, SCBA, Irons, thermal cams, etc) on EVERY AFA call. I've seen other companies who just respond in regular station wear. I think it's 100% unacceptable. There have been times where crews respond to a "routine" AFA and find a working fire...only to gear up on-scene. Jesus Christ...this is our JOB to RESPOND and be PREPARED to rock-and-roll. That "routine" AFA could be THE time. It could be THAT fire where that little kid is trapped. It's our job to respond and be prepared to act.

    Not too much to ask at all. At our vollie house we have be struggling with convincing people its a good idea to get off the truck COMBAT READY

    3. I've noticed some crews that will take 1-2 minutes to turn-out on one of those "routine" MVAs or EMS runs. I expect my team to be (from the second of the tones) ON THE ROAD in 45 seconds day or night. Some say it's crazy to be in such a hurry. I've heard..."Mike, it's just a medical emergency. Why do you want us to run to the engine?". Again, it's our JOB and DUTY to respond in a FAST manner. Just because Locution says "Fall" or "Headache" doesn't mean it's not serious. I've seen "Gun Shot Wounds" turn into nosebleeds and "Medical Emergencies" turn into to confirmed chokings.

    I'm all for quick turnouts but like others have said, I don't know how your station is laid out. Our new station at the vollie house is enormous and they put the living quarters at the furthest possible point from the staffed rigs, so if you're in your bedroom, it could literally take you 30-40 seconds just to get to the truck.

    4. I expect my team to buckle up. Every ride. Every time.

    Should go without saying

    5. I expect ALL our EMS bags to go in on EVERY EMS call. I expect our airway kit, AED, and general EMS bag to go in on EVERY call.

    Yes and no. We always take in our airway bag and monitor. If it comes out as an ALS call such as an unconscious we will grab the drug box and suction.

    6. Anytime we have an overtime firefighter or new rookie, I expect to sit down with them and have the infamous "BST" (as my team calls it). It's the Big Safety Talk. I explain to them that safety is EVERYONE'S responsibility. I expect ANY team member to speak up if they think something is dangerous. I explain that there is ABSOLUTELY nothing wrong with speaking up when you think something is dangerous. Whether it's a rook telling me that he thinks what I'm doing is dangerous...or me telling a driver that he's driving dangerously. There is NO barrier when it comes to safety.

    I don't think it needs to be a sit down talk, but just mention it to the guys in the morning who are new there. I know some of our salty guys would laugh right in your face and tell you to shut the f*Ck up. We have a Lt. who sounds somewhat similar to you and as soon as he walks in the door, one of our senior members tells him right away to shut his mouth. Everyday, like clockwork.

    Is that really THAT much to ask for? I'm not laid back. I don't mess around. I've got a job to do with 100% of my effort! I've had people get upset with what I expect and even one firefighter leave the house for a reassignment because he didn't like my "rules".

    Didn't realize this was an old thread...... oh well
    Last edited by backsteprescue; 01-17-2011 at 10:57 AM.
    ------------------------------------
    These opinions are mine and do not reflect the opinions of any organizations I am affiliated with.
    ------------------------------------

  22. #72
    Forum Member
    truckedup133's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    131

    Default

    sorry to start this up, but curiousity got me. he is talkin about litterally running to the truck on call, of any nature. I feel just the opposite. our crew and our lt. like to take our time to reach the truck. on our way we hear the address, the call, the locational grid numbers and who we are working with. we also hear the fireground radio channel. ill tell you there is nothing more annoying than getting a new guy full of **** and vinegar who asks us 15 or 16 times a day what radio channe we are on. i suppose an outside might think we dont care or are lacadaisical but if it is an emergency for a firefighter too, then who else do you call? we meet every run, fire, mva or diff. breathing by walking quickly, being deliberate and staying calm. it would seem this lt. has lost his calm within 45 seconds of the bell dropping.

  23. #73
    Forum Member
    backsteprescue123's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    4,318

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by truckedup133 View Post
    sorry to start this up, but curiousity got me. he is talkin about litterally running to the truck on call, of any nature. I feel just the opposite. our crew and our lt. like to take our time to reach the truck. on our way we hear the address, the call, the locational grid numbers and who we are working with. we also hear the fireground radio channel. ill tell you there is nothing more annoying than getting a new guy full of **** and vinegar who asks us 15 or 16 times a day what radio channe we are on. i suppose an outside might think we dont care or are lacadaisical but if it is an emergency for a firefighter too, then who else do you call? we meet every run, fire, mva or diff. breathing by walking quickly, being deliberate and staying calm. it would seem this lt. has lost his calm within 45 seconds of the bell dropping.
    Just a thought. If you were to use capital letters, spaces, proper spelling, etc, your response may be easier to understand.

    I think that getting to the rig quickly is an issue of company pride. And I completely disagree with you as far as taking your time jsut so you can listen to the call. If you know your piece has been dispatched you can always find out in the truck whether from the MDT or just checking on the air and asking dispatch to repeat themselves.

    God knows dispatchers need to be kept on their toes from time to time. Hell half the time our dispatchers (PD/FD) will just turn down the fire frequencies on their console and ignore us.
    ------------------------------------
    These opinions are mine and do not reflect the opinions of any organizations I am affiliated with.
    ------------------------------------

  24. #74
    Forum Member
    truckedup133's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    131

    Default

    Please forgive my indifference with grammatical errors. I have consistently looked at this board, and most forums online, as being a safe haven from my elementary teachers. I was wrong and I assure you; No longer will you slave with confusion over my postings.
    Now, back to the topic at hand. Please do not feel like I am bickering, as I am curious to how fire companies operate in different areas. I work at an all career urban department. So I do suppose that we do not have to mess with a PD/FD dispatch that treats the FD with indifference. But, that being said, keep this in mind: Would you rather have
    1)3 Engines, 2 Ladders, 1 Squad , 1 Ambulance and 1 Chief all on the truck in 45 seconds but immediately hitting in to control asking for the pertinent information regarding the run...

    Or

    2)3 Engines, 2 Ladders, 1 Squad , 1 Ambulance and 1 Chief all on the truck in 1 minute and 10 seconds. But in this time, instead of running and hurrying to the apparatus, they walked briskly and LISTENED so as to be prepared as they rolled out? Now in each respective unit, instead of re-hashing information that was already dispatched, you have a company of men re-hashing assignments and listening to what the company officer needs upon arrival.

    Just food for thought and heres to a decent debate. Something that has been sorely lacking in recent weeks among this board.

    Rebuttal?

  25. #75
    Let's talk fire trucks!
    BoxAlarm187's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    3,324

    Default

    We're expected to be on the road within 45-60 seconds of dispatch during the day, 1 minute 30 seconds at night. Like RFD said, all of our info is on the MDT screen, so we'll listen to the dispatch, but we don't have to stay glued to the overhead speakers.
    Career Fire Captain
    Volunteer Chief Officer


    Never taking for granted that I'm privileged enough to have the greatest job in the world!

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Log in

Click here to log in or register