1. #1
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    4

    Post Rescue Tool Maintenance

    I come from a full volunteer dept. with a major 4 lane highway through our district. We have a set of Genesis Rescue tools with a H-1 mini pump that are about 15 yrs old. We were told that we should have an annual service on these tools. We have a variety of members on our dept. ranging from tractor mechanics to car mechanics to aircraft mechanics. We are running short on funding, so we would like to service this equipment ourselves. Can anyone help me with manuals for our pump. We already have the manuals for the tools, but Genesis keeps sending us users manuals for newer pumps that are of no help to us. We respond to over 50 car accidents per year, so we really need to make out stuff last.

  2. #2
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    306

    Default

    Who has been servicing and maintaining your tools for the past 15 years ? Have you attempted to contact the local dealer that you initially purchased the tools from ? If this dealer has changed I would try locating the closest dealer from you in regards to this issue.

    http://www.genesisrescue.com/html/Co...NthAmerica.asp

    As far as in house service other than routine preventative maintenance I would refrain from that unless you have folks that are properly certified by the tool manufacturer to do such. Lots of issues to address there including the liability that you are assuming.

    Are you currently billing for your MVA responses ? At 50 per year you should be able to fund your regular PM and required annual maintenance for your tools.

  3. #3
    Forum Member
    firemanpat29's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    florida
    Posts
    427

    Default

    where are you located? our local dealer gave us a great price on servicing our genesis tools. they even had a complete loaner set with them so if any tool was out of spec, or needed major repairs they could take it back to their repair shop and we would still have a full set of tools.

  4. #4
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    4

    Default

    We have no problem with finding someone else to do the maintenance. We would just like to be able to do it in house on a regular basis. We do not want to do major repairs, but would like to at least check the pump output pressure and adjust if necessary. There is nothing complicated about this other than getting a definite answer on what pressure is correct for our unit. The salesman said he could get the info, but has yet to come up with any kind of info for our model of pump. Everything is for newer pumps. The company that would do PM for us is not giving this info up.

  5. #5
    Forum Member
    Rescue101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Bridgton,Me USA
    Posts
    8,162

    Default

    Probably a reason for that. Unless you are CERTIFIED by the Tool mfg to do service on them and have had the appropriate classes my SHORT answer is don't mess with them.Not that you may not have people capable of doing the work,it's more a liability thing if something goes wrong. If you don't have money enough to have your tools serviced,you DAMN sure don't have money enough to defend yourself in litigation. Which,you may have noticed,is pretty POPULAR today. T.C.
    Last edited by Rescue101; 01-20-2011 at 08:35 PM.

  6. #6
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    4

    Default

    So, what you telling me is that because society has become "sue-happy" I should just forget it. I guess I'll quit my job as an aircraft mechanic as well. I fully understand the liabilty of things. I pour over more regulations in the first hour of my day than most people see in their life. I sign my life away on airplanes eveyday. One little pressure setting on a pump that never leaves the ground does not scare me. I make the same adjustments on pumps that provide power to major control systems and landing gear. I have in my hands the same information that I am looking for, but for newer pumps, so the information is out there somewhere.

  7. #7
    Forum Member
    Rescue101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Bridgton,Me USA
    Posts
    8,162

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by planefixxer View Post
    So, what you telling me is that because society has become "sue-happy" I should just forget it. I guess I'll quit my job as an aircraft mechanic as well. I fully understand the liabilty of things. I pour over more regulations in the first hour of my day than most people see in their life. I sign my life away on airplanes eveyday. One little pressure setting on a pump that never leaves the ground does not scare me. I make the same adjustments on pumps that provide power to major control systems and landing gear. I have in my hands the same information that I am looking for, but for newer pumps, so the information is out there somewhere.
    Couldn't PAY me enough to work on a plane. And do as you wish,but the reasons MOST mfgs don't release that info is for the reasons I outlined. Our tools are serviced by a FACTORY rep annually. It's CHEAP insurance and one less thing I have to worry about.Good luck on your quest. T.C.

  8. #8
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    199

    Default

    If it's OK for an airplane mechanic to dabble in rescue tools, I guess it's OK for a rescue tool mechanic mess with airplanes

  9. #9
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MEAN15 View Post
    If it's OK for an airplane mechanic to dabble in rescue tools, I guess it's OK for a rescue tool mechanic mess with airplanes
    Just the same as with doctors. I would let a surgeon also be my general practitioner, but I would be a little cautious letting my general practitioner be my surgeon.

  10. #10
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    90

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by planefixxer View Post
    Just the same as with doctors. I would let a surgeon also be my general practitioner, but I would be a little cautious letting my general practitioner be my surgeon.
    I've worked on airplanes...everything from single engine prop, to commercial airlines, to Air Force I & II. It's not that glamorous, you simply follow the maintenance manual...step-by-step from step one until you're done. FAA won't let Airframe & Powerplant mechanics deviate from manual, not even one step. If it tells you remove the screw...guess what? Remove the screw. If it tells you to torque the nut to 100 ft. lbs...guess what? Torque the nut to 100 ft. lbs. Nothing more, nothing less. As long as you follow everything step-by-step, the planes going to fly.

    On the other hand...if you're smart enough to earn your A&P certificate...you're smart enough to work on hydraulic tools...it's only 7,000 psi.

  11. #11
    Forum Member
    Rescue101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Bridgton,Me USA
    Posts
    8,162

    Default

    Another reason to have annuals done by AUTHORIZED service centers is the WARRANTY. Our new tools have a LIFETIME warranty, PROVIDED: That they are serviced ANNUALLY by and AUTHORIZED Service tech AND that they are not abused or used in a manner not prescribed by the Mfg. T.C.
    Last edited by Rescue101; 01-20-2011 at 08:36 PM.

  12. #12
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    39

    Default Good lord help the American fire service

    Quote Originally Posted by GFD615 View Post
    I've worked on airplanes...everything from single engine prop, to commercial airlines, to Air Force I & II. It's not that glamorous, you simply follow the maintenance manual...step-by-step from step one until you're done. FAA won't let Airframe & Powerplant mechanics deviate from manual, not even one step. If it tells you remove the screw...guess what? Remove the screw. If it tells you to torque the nut to 100 ft. lbs...guess what? Torque the nut to 100 ft. lbs. Nothing more, nothing less. As long as you follow everything step-by-step, the planes going to fly.

    On the other hand...if you're smart enough to earn your A&P certificate...you're smart enough to work on hydraulic tools...it's only 7,000 psi.
    I work on refridgerators. Kenmore, LG, Whirlpool- It is very easy to do. The freon we put in them is set at 4psi. I know it has NOTHING to do with this post, but I thought everyone in the fire service might be interested. It seems to be the direction this post is going in...what the hell.

    PlaneFix guy: your power unit is 15 years old- it's time to buy a new one.

    By the way GFD- rescue tools operate at 10,500psi, not 7,000...probably best you stick to something simple, like airplanes.

  13. #13
    Forum Member
    backsteprescue123's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    4,318

    Default

    Wouldn't you rather have your tools serviced by someone authorized and certified in such a thing? If not for the safety of your firefighters but also the victims? And to protect your department from any liability?
    ------------------------------------
    These opinions are mine and do not reflect the opinions of any organizations I am affiliated with.
    ------------------------------------

  14. #14
    Forum Member
    Rescue101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Bridgton,Me USA
    Posts
    8,162

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by laddercompany20 View Post
    I work on refridgerators. Kenmore, LG, Whirlpool- It is very easy to do. The freon we put in them is set at 4psi. I know it has NOTHING to do with this post, but I thought everyone in the fire service might be interested. It seems to be the direction this post is going in...what the hell.

    PlaneFix guy: your power unit is 15 years old- it's time to buy a new one.

    By the way GFD- rescue tools operate at 10,500psi, not 7,000...probably best you stick to something simple, like airplanes.
    Not necessarily. Some are 5000 Psi some 10,500. Genesis happens to be 10,500. So a blanket pressure statement doesn't work. I STILL have mine factory serviced,thank you. T.C.

  15. #15
    Forum Member
    Bones42's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    Pt. Beach, NJ
    Posts
    10,686

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by laddercompany20 View Post
    ...By the way GFD- rescue tools operate at 10,500psi, not 7,000...probably best you stick to something simple, like airplanes.
    My Hurst unit runs at 5000. My Holmatro runs at 10,500.


    Maybe you should stick to something simple too.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

  16. #16
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    90

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by laddercompany20 View Post
    I work on refridgerators. Kenmore, LG, Whirlpool- It is very easy to do. The freon we put in them is set at 4psi. I know it has NOTHING to do with this post, but I thought everyone in the fire service might be interested. It seems to be the direction this post is going in...what the hell.

    PlaneFix guy: your power unit is 15 years old- it's time to buy a new one.

    By the way GFD- rescue tools operate at 10,500psi, not 7,000...probably best you stick to something simple, like airplanes.
    Just to let you know...all commercial airline hydraulic systems operate at only 3000 psi (which planefixxer knows) 7000 psi is the difference between a hydraulic system between an aircraft and fire rescue.

  17. #17
    Forum Member
    Rescue101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Bridgton,Me USA
    Posts
    8,162

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GFD615 View Post
    Just to let you know...all commercial airline hydraulic systems operate at only 3000 psi (which planefixxer knows) 7000 psi is the difference between a hydraulic system between an aircraft and fire rescue.
    AGAIN,Not necessarily. With Genesis it would be 7500 Psi difference. ResQtec and Hurst,only 2000psi difference. T.C.

  18. #18
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    90

    Default

    Who cares about pressure? Early Hurst started at 4200psi, now they're 5000psi. Everyone else is in the 10,000 range...either way, a pin-hole leak at 3000 psi will cut your arm in half.

  19. #19
    Forum Member
    Rescue101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Bridgton,Me USA
    Posts
    8,162

    Default

    Dunno. As long as the pressure is CORRECT and goes where it's needed,I guess NOBODY. If it DOESN'T you MAY be UNHAPPY. All the more reason for annual service. T.C.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Firefighters turned away at Wva Mine.CNN reports
    By coldfront in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 50
    Last Post: 07-14-2007, 09:26 AM
  2. First Rescue Tools Designed for Improved Safety in Hybrid Vehicle Rescues
    By HeavyRescueTech in forum University of Extrication
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 12-03-2005, 10:16 AM
  3. World Of Fire Report: 02-19-05
    By PaulBrown in forum World of Fire Daily Report
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 02-22-2005, 10:23 PM
  4. Civilian Fire Fatalities
    By DCFF in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 38
    Last Post: 02-08-2002, 08:18 AM
  5. We have to look into our darkest day
    By harlemBrother in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 02-02-2002, 06:41 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Log in

Click here to log in or register