1. #1
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    So of Can. / N. of Mexico
    Posts
    869

    Default E-One Introduces 137' Aerial

    E-One has introduced a new aerial. A tall boy!

    http://www.emergencyone.com/products...l/new-~-cr-137

  2. #2
    Forum Member
    SFD_E73_RET's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    KC area
    Posts
    305

    Default

    "Send the new guy up"

  3. #3
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    2,802

    Default

    wouldn't that be reintroduce? didn't they used to sell a 135ish ladder?

  4. #4
    MembersZone Subscriber
    npfd801's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Somewhere in Illinois
    Posts
    2,220

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nameless View Post
    wouldn't that be reintroduce? didn't they used to sell a 135ish ladder?
    I'd bet this is pretty much a new stick. Weren't the tip loads of the old 135 considerably less than what they're touting on the 137?
    "Share your knowledge - it's a way to achieve immortality." - Stolen from Chase Sargent's Buddy to Boss program

  5. #5
    Forum Member
    CaptOldTimer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 1999
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    7,257

    Default

    They are claiming that it will reach 13 stories. Any fireman knows that this truck would have to be set up right next to the building and be raise almost at a 80 degree or so angle.

    They don't say and they won't either, about buildings that are set back from the street maybe 50 or so feet and no way to get up alongside those. Take the apartments building that are set back from the parking areas that at 0200 you have vehicles headed in to the curb that you have to try to position the truck to get the maximum reach for any operation.

    Tall ladders are nice guys. We ran 100 foot tractor drawn for years, no they didn't ever get above the 7th or 8th floor on even the best days we had.

    We have argued with sales people for years claiming this or that. As a side note a bullard hemet salesman came by the fd drill school one day claiming this and that about their new helmet. He said nothing can perpetrate the shell.

    I said "Oh nothing Huh"? He said yup. I took a number 2 phillips screw driver in my right hand and drove it all the way through the shell, impact cap. He said that it should not have done that. I asked him if he would like to put it on his head and I try it again? He picked up his helmet and walked out, got in his car and drove away. We never saw him again.


    Moral of that story, don't believe nothing they are saying and half of what they are showing, It isn't fireman proof!
    Stay Safe and Well Out There....

    Always remembering 9-11-2001 and 343+ Brothers

  6. #6
    ...
    ... is offline
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    420

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CaptOldTimer View Post
    As a side note a bullard hemet salesman came by the fd drill school one day claiming this and that about their new helmet. He said nothing can perpetrate the shell.

    I said "Oh nothing Huh"? He said yup. I took a number 2 phillips screw driver in my right hand and drove it all the way through the shell, impact cap. He said that it should not have done that. I asked him if he would like to put it on his head and I try it again? He picked up his helmet and walked out, got in his car and drove away. We never saw him again.


    Moral of that story, don't believe nothing they are saying and half of what they are showing, It isn't fireman proof!

  7. #7
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Rural Iowa
    Posts
    3,106

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CaptOldTimer View Post
    They are claiming that it will reach 13 stories. ...
    So is it 137' or not?

  8. #8
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Rural Iowa
    Posts
    3,106

    Default

    Says:

    CR 137 is its ability to reach a target that is 110 high AND 82 horizontally off the side while supporting a 750 personnel tip load.

  9. #9
    MembersZone Subscriber
    npfd801's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Somewhere in Illinois
    Posts
    2,220

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by neiowa View Post
    Says:

    CR 137 is its ability to reach a target that is 110 high AND 82 horizontally off the side while supporting a 750 personnel tip load.
    And that even holds up mathematically!!! I just flashbacked to geometry class and worked it out...
    "Share your knowledge - it's a way to achieve immortality." - Stolen from Chase Sargent's Buddy to Boss program

  10. #10
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Greensboro, NC USA
    Posts
    1,312

    Default

    One the hydraulic side... I notice the waterway is pinned on the 2nd to last fly section, so it's max elevation is 110'. I would have been surprised is it was located at the tip.

    Here's they're dilemma if they put it at 137':
    137' elevation, minus 4' where the pump impeller is above the ground, equals 133'. 133 x 0.434 = 58 psi head pressure.

    250 psi is max the pump is rated at.
    250 - 53 psi head pressure = 197
    197 - 100 psi nozzle pressure (NFPA requirement) = 97 psi.

    So the total friction loss from pump to nozzle, at 1,000 GPM cannot exceed 97 psi. And that's through the valve, collector assembly, and ladder piping.

    Anyone buying one of these would be well off to buy a 2-stage pump rated at no less than 2,000 GPM.


    Under-slung stabilizers? You can count me out.

    Don't be fooled by the "750 lb" marketing gimmicks guys. The rated tip load on this aerial is 250 pounds. NFPA requires an aerial ladder to hold it's rated tip load at any angle & any elevation. At full horizontal, this aerial holds 250 lbs. The 750 lb tip load is at higher elevations, and/or shorter extensions.

    This reminds me of the old ALF and Seagrave aerials with inclinometers showing their tip loads and extension capabilities.
    Last edited by txgp17; 08-26-2010 at 11:34 PM.
    The American people will never knowingly adopt Socialism. But under the name of 'liberalism' they will adopt every fragment of the Socialist program, until one day America will be a Socialist nation, without knowing how it happened. --Norman Mattoon Thomas, 6 time presidential candidate for the Socialist Party of America

  11. #11
    MembersZone Subscriber
    npfd801's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Somewhere in Illinois
    Posts
    2,220

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by npfd801 View Post
    I'd bet this is pretty much a new stick. Weren't the tip loads of the old 135 considerably less than what they're touting on the 137?
    I'm a moron. I'm sure its the same stick as of old.

    http://www.emergencyone.com/files/pr...ochures/96.pdf

    Look at the load chart and it looks to have similar ratings as that of the old 135.
    "Share your knowledge - it's a way to achieve immortality." - Stolen from Chase Sargent's Buddy to Boss program

  12. #12
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    So of Can. / N. of Mexico
    Posts
    869

    Default

    If you scroll up above the load chart, there is an impressive picture of a high access with the truck still away from the building.

  13. #13
    Forum Member
    CaptOldTimer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 1999
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    7,257

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by neiowa View Post
    So is it 137' or not?


    From their web site....



    http://www.e-one.com/products/main-l...l/new-~-cr-137


    Buildings aren’t getting shorter. Fires don’t have a maximum height limit. So why should your aerial ladder be any different? Reaching more than 13 stories high, the new CR 137 is North America’s tallest aerial ladder.
    The CR 137 features narrow criss-cross under-slung stabilizers and a speedy set up – less than 45 seconds. The welded extruded aluminum ladder combined with advanced engineering provides a 2.5 to 1 structural safety factor, exceeding NFPA requirements. As with most E-ONE aerials, the integral torque box frame offers a rock solid foundation for the chassis and aerial, while providing a lower center of gravity than a bolt-on torque box for improved vehicle handling. Perhaps the most impressive feature of the CR 137 is its ability to reach a target that is 110’ high AND 82’ horizontally off the side while supporting a 750 personnel tip load. For maximum reach, strength, stability and safety, make sure your crew is riding in the new E-ONE CR 137.


    I still would be shy of this thing.
    Stay Safe and Well Out There....

    Always remembering 9-11-2001 and 343+ Brothers

  14. #14
    Let's talk fire trucks!
    BoxAlarm187's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    3,325

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CaptOldTimer View Post
    I still would be shy of this thing.
    Yet many large (and small) departments across the US found success with the older 135' models?
    Career Fire Captain
    Volunteer Chief Officer


    Never taking for granted that I'm privileged enough to have the greatest job in the world!

  15. #15
    MembersZone Subscriber
    npfd801's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Somewhere in Illinois
    Posts
    2,220

    Default

    However, compare Smeal's 120 footer tip load at any angle as food for thought. Yes, I know its shorter...

    And yes, I know lots of rigs are still running around with a 250 pound tip load at various elevations and angles.
    "Share your knowledge - it's a way to achieve immortality." - Stolen from Chase Sargent's Buddy to Boss program

  16. #16
    Back In Black
    ChiefKN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    The Nice Part of New Jersey
    Posts
    6,981

    Default

    I didn't know they could stack old soda cans that high....
    I am now a past chief and the views, opinions, and comments are mine and mine alone. I do not speak for any department or in any official capacity. Although, they would be smart to listen to me.

    "The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on the list."

    "When tempted to fight fire with fire, remember that the Fire Department usually uses water."

  17. #17
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    228

    Default

    Something I haven't figured out, I used to run a commercial aerial truck for a sign company. The truck I worked most on was a 90ft (,http://www.elliottequip.com/modeldet...=1&model_id=99) with platform, ladder mounted on the boom, and cable winch for lifting. We had a several thousand pound tip load at full extension, and these trucks were not as large, complicated, or as expensive as fire aerials. Now I realize these trucks don't meet NFPA, they are not designed to be in high heat situations (which isn't good on any aerial), and are not designed with pumps, tanks, etc, but they still have a lot of the functionality. This particular manufacturer even has a 153 foot platform.

  18. #18
    Forum Member
    CaptOldTimer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 1999
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    7,257

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mcwops View Post
    Something I haven't figured out, I used to run a commercial aerial truck for a sign company. The truck I worked most on was a 90ft (,http://www.elliottequip.com/modeldet...=1&model_id=99) with platform, ladder mounted on the boom, and cable winch for lifting. We had a several thousand pound tip load at full extension, and these trucks were not as large, complicated, or as expensive as fire aerials. Now I realize these trucks don't meet NFPA, they are not designed to be in high heat situations (which isn't good on any aerial), and are not designed with pumps, tanks, etc, but they still have a lot of the functionality. This particular manufacturer even has a 153 foot platform.


    That truck you worked wasn't a piece of fire apparatus, which lives of firemen and civilians may have to depend on.

    It is something like apples and oranges, two complete diffrenet vehicles designed to do what it was made for.

    Stay Safe and Well Out There....

    Always remembering 9-11-2001 and 343+ Brothers

  19. #19
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Monroeville, PA USA
    Posts
    327

    Default

    Yes they had a 135' aerial, I have one for sale if anyones interested.

    The 135' truly was an awesome rig, at an over all length of 44' (tip to tailboard) it was very manuevarable, and with out a doubt the easiest thing to drive in the station. We recently replaced it with a 100' super tiller, only becasue 2 years ago when the process for replacement began, they didn't offerr the 135 anymore and there were no plans to do so, otherwise, it would have been another 135. You may think there is no need to have the extra reach, but I can tell you it more the horizontal reach that makes the difference. On the 135 its 124' of reach, and it makes a difference (especally when the idiots driving the wagons ignore the need for propper truck placement)
    Im not nor was I ever an employee of E-One, but i gotta say, if your considering a new 100' truck, you need to take a look at one of these. I don't think you'd be disapointed.
    It takes a little intelligence to enjoy humor,satire & wit, but none to be offended by it.

    It take more than a new Leather Helmet to make you a good officer

  20. #20
    Forum Member
    IronsMan53's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    656

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by txgp17 View Post
    Under-slung stabilizers? You can count me out.
    Why???????
    I can't believe they actually pay me to do this!!!

    One friend noted yesterday that a fire officer only carries a flashlight, sometimes prompting grumbling from firefighters who have to lug tools and hoses.
    "The old saying is you never know how heavy that flashlight can become," the friend said.
    -from a tragic story posted on firefighterclosecalls.com

  21. #21
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Northeast Coast
    Posts
    3,867

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by IronsMan53 View Post
    Why???????
    Good question, that's one of E-One's strongest features. A 13' 8" jack stance for a 137' aerial?! If the Big "P" built one it would have to span two parallel streets!

  22. #22
    Forum Member
    MemphisE34a's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Memphis, TN - USA
    Posts
    2,526

    Default

    We have a vast majority E-One fleet. It may just be me, but I have a problem with a company that keeps introducing latest and greatest when they cannot get the air conditioners to work on any of them.

    Fix the problems with the stuff your already putting out the door - then worry about expanding your production line.
    RK
    cell #901-494-9437

    Management is making sure things are done right. Leadership is doing the right thing. The fire service needs alot more leaders and a lot less managers.

    "Everyone goes home" is the mantra for the pussification of the modern, American fire service.


    Comments made are my own. They do not represent the official position or opinion of the Fire Department or the City for which I am employed. In fact, they are normally exactly the opposite.

  23. #23
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    228

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CaptOldTimer View Post
    That truck you worked wasn't a piece of fire apparatus, which lives of firemen and civilians may have to depend on.

    It is something like apples and oranges, two complete diffrenet vehicles designed to do what it was made for.

    And I realize that isn't what it was designed for. My idea is why don't they design fire apparatus with similar construction? Most fire aerials are being built lighter and lighter, with what I see as questionable tip loads. It would seem that the commercial manufacturers are able to reach the same heights, if not higher, with much higher tip loads.

    And honestly, what is the difference between the life of a firefighter, and a sign guy? The truck must still be designed to be safe for the operator, regardless of occupation. What makes a fire apparatus any better or safer? (Note, not trying to be a smartass, but asking an actual question)

  24. #24
    Back In Black
    ChiefKN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    The Nice Part of New Jersey
    Posts
    6,981

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mcwops View Post
    And honestly, what is the difference between the life of a firefighter, and a sign guy? The truck must still be designed to be safe for the operator, regardless of occupation. What makes a fire apparatus any better or safer? (Note, not trying to be a smartass, but asking an actual question)
    Couple of thoughts, and I'm no engineer...

    Firefighters weigh more when fully turned out. Considerably more.

    Add that to the dynamic weight of a victim jumping onto the ladder or multiple victims using the ladder as egress.

    It's just a different expectation of needed durability, I would imagine.
    I am now a past chief and the views, opinions, and comments are mine and mine alone. I do not speak for any department or in any official capacity. Although, they would be smart to listen to me.

    "The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on the list."

    "When tempted to fight fire with fire, remember that the Fire Department usually uses water."

  25. #25
    Forum Member
    Rescue101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Bridgton,Me USA
    Posts
    8,162

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mcwops View Post
    And I realize that isn't what it was designed for. My idea is why don't they design fire apparatus with similar construction? Most fire aerials are being built lighter and lighter, with what I see as questionable tip loads. It would seem that the commercial manufacturers are able to reach the same heights, if not higher, with much higher tip loads.

    And honestly, what is the difference between the life of a firefighter, and a sign guy? The truck must still be designed to be safe for the operator, regardless of occupation. What makes a fire apparatus any better or safer? (Note, not trying to be a smartass, but asking an actual question)
    NOTHING ( in sign trucks)is designed to take the shock/thermal loads that Fire apparatus do. That's PART of the difference.And also why tip loads have increased since Pirsch and the other early ladders. T.C.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. AERIAL Head to Head
    By SmealLadder1 in forum Apparatus Innovation
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 07-30-2007, 08:58 PM
  2. Aerial Ladder Priority in '06?
    By firemakeith in forum Federal FIRE ACT Grants & Funding
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 01-17-2006, 11:35 PM
  3. Electrifying Aerial Experience
    By STATION2 in forum Apparatus Innovation
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 02-11-2004, 09:43 PM
  4. Aerial Platform Questions ?
    By edorolin in forum Apparatus Innovation
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-16-2004, 09:17 PM
  5. Aerial rescue
    By resqtek in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 01-14-2004, 09:31 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Log in

Click here to log in or register