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    Default cribbing what are the pro and cons

    my dept needs cribbing and looking into wood and plastic cribbing. The ? came up wich is better. What are the pros and cons of both so we can decide wich is better for our area we are a rual farm area. With 3 state route going throu it

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    Quote Originally Posted by wrfdcap View Post
    What are the pros and cons of both so we can decide wich is better for our area we are a rual farm area. With 3 state route going throu it

    I have both. we looked at the turtle plastics and purchased it 8 years ago. not bad for performance but some say that thit is slick when wet. that is likely the diamond cut and the lincoln log design on alot of them. i went back to wood last year when outfitting the 2 new rescue engines. below are my reasons.

    cost: wood, much less expensive

    storage: wood, you can do multiple lengths that will exactly fit the compartments you have on the rig

    customization: wood, i can cut a 8 footer to what i need

    function: wood, you will get the box crib to sink into adjoing wood members under loads and making it more secure than a non compressing plastic. also we have 28" wood versus 24" plastic seeing that i then can make the box crib up to 72" not just 60".

    http://www.res-q-jack.com/Res-Q-Jack...bbing-Use.html a good read for you. this is only the tip of the 'berg.
    Originally Posted by madden01
    "and everyone is encouraged to use Plain, Spelled Out English. I thought this was covered in NIMS training."

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    with cribbing whats better finish cut or ruff cut and am i right no treated lumber

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    You will want rough cut hardwood. Finished lumber can slip. Soft wood is just that, soft. It will break and deform.

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    Don't get hung up on hard wood or soft wood! There is a wide range of density in all species. In general hard woods loose their leaves and soft woods don't (evergreens). An example of a hard wood that is very soft is balsa wood, probably not a good choice for cribbing!

    That being said the FEMA guide recommends southern pine or douglas fir. When using cribbing if it is heavily loaded they will compress and lock together some and they also have a built in warning because you can hear crushing when they near failure. These are also a couple of reasons IMO to NOT use plastic cribbing. Not to mention you can replace your wood cribbing 10 times for the same cost as plastic.

    Get yourself a FEMA FOG or SOG and it will have alot of information on the strenghts and configurations of cribbing.

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    Hardwoods and soft woods are a completely different designation than deciduous (lose leaves yearly) versus evergreen (maintain greenery throughout the year). There are hard and soft varieties within each species. For example, there are hardwood maple trees, and there are softwood maple trees.

    Douglas Fir, and pine are softwoods. There is discussion on whether it is better to have the "warning" from softwoods, or the capacity of hardwood. Your capacity of something like a white oak (hardwood) compared to a douglas fir will be something on the order of 2.5 to 3 times as much capacity before deflection. I prefer the capacity.

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    We use whatever scraps we get when someone is building a deck.

    Yes, it's pressure treated. No, never had any type of problem with it.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

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    Quote Originally Posted by HuntPA View Post
    Hardwoods and soft woods are a completely different designation than deciduous (lose leaves yearly) versus evergreen (maintain greenery throughout the year). There are hard and soft varieties within each species. For example, there are hardwood maple trees, and there are softwood maple trees.

    Douglas Fir, and pine are softwoods. There is discussion on whether it is better to have the "warning" from softwoods, or the capacity of hardwood. Your capacity of something like a white oak (hardwood) compared to a douglas fir will be something on the order of 2.5 to 3 times as much capacity before deflection. I prefer the capacity.
    I'm aware of deciduous vs. evergreen thats why i said "in general". My point being that even a so called "hard wood" like balsa, may not have the capacity of a "soft wood" like douglas fir.

    Just use the FEMA guide, it has all been tested so you know the capacity, the douglas fir or pine will compress and lock together, you have a built in warning, and if it is good enough to shore a building the capacity is plenty for whatever a typical rescue company is going to see on the road. There just isn't any reason for oak, but i'd take anything over plastic!

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    Dont be too hard on plastic cribbing till you at least see the ResQTec CribLoc series... similar to Legos (and all you guys like Legos).... work very well and are extremely strong!

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    Both. you want both plastic cribbing and wood. you also want hardwood and some softwood depending on your application.

    I find some great benefits with the plastic cribbing. I thru a pic in of using turtle plastic cribbing along with a special made wood "crib box".

    the cold hard truth... you probably are not going to have a sufficient amount of cribbing that you need on your truck for some big lifts.

    If it counts, i have a resume of over a thousand lifts.. and I'm not talking cars and training classes only....lol. I'm talking lifts of some substance and in the real world.

    the pic below is that of a crane with counterweights and boom attached. appox 200,000 pounds

    [IMG][/IMG]

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    Quote Originally Posted by scooby0066 View Post
    ...I find some great benefits with the plastic cribbing...
    Such as? Honest question.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

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    they interlock. that has some tremendous benefits. Also if you see the large 6X6 cribbing standing on end at the front of the pic...one can observe the plastic "teeth". these are great for interlocking with the air bag also when used to build a base..... in addition to locking together with each other

    I have seen many pics of rescue where the cribbing stack is manipulated to angle. when the cribbing itself can lock together, in this particular application, the likelihood of the cribbing stack "kicking out" is reduced. Even when one stays withing the 3 to 1 height/base ratio factor.

    grease/oil is easily wiped away. It soaks into wood.

    Like I said, I like wood also, but I actually use my cribbing on a weekly basis, so the plastic cribbing allows me a greater shelf life also. I find myself replacing the wood step ups more often ( i haven't replaced the plastic step ups yet). Replacing my wood step-ups require time in my garage making them. I would rather spend my time doing something else.

    There is big downfall to the plastics that, in all fairness, I should list... to be fair and partial.
    I find them getting "mistakingly" placed in someone else's rig from time to time...lol. I now have all my cribbing identified.

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