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    Default Selective Dispatch

    I asked about if any depts have to hear every call over there speakers all night long a couple years ago and very few did. We still with around 10,000 calls coming over the radio have to listen to radio traffic all night long. Now they will say which company goes but you still are not sleeping very well with radio traffic. With the studies out about sleep and how important it is, are there NFPA standards addressing selective dispatch? My dept only likes to follow NFPA when it is convienent for them though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Squad1LT View Post
    I asked about if any depts have to hear every call over there speakers all night long a couple years ago and very few did. We still with around 10,000 calls coming over the radio have to listen to radio traffic all night long. Now they will say which company goes but you still are not sleeping very well with radio traffic. With the studies out about sleep and how important it is, are there NFPA standards addressing selective dispatch? My dept only likes to follow NFPA when it is convienent for them though.
    In my small dept we have two stations and 11 on duty, no ems we average around 900 runs per year. The shift commander (myself) and the LT at the 2nd station are the only ones that have to listen to the radio all night.
    Am I being effective in my efforts or am I merely showing up in my fireman costume to watch a house burn down? (Joe Brown, www.justlookingbusy.wordpress.com)

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    From the way you described it, I get the impression that everybody in the station hears the radio traffic all night long.

    My department is fairly small, but we share a dispatch channel with a lot of other FDs in our "County Zone". We don't have to listen to all of the dispatches if we don't want to. We are dispatched by tone and when we went onto the common channel, we had an alert channel programmed into our station radios specifically so we wouldn't be disturbed by calls that we didn't need to worry about.

    The large metro department nearby utilizes a "night watch" system. They are dispatched strictly by voice, no station alerting tone. As I understand the system, one firefighter from the on-duty staffing stays up overnight to monitor the radio. If a unit from that station is dispatched on a call, then they wake up the crew. Not sure if they have in-house "alerting" or if the wake up is by direct contact. The "night watch" detail rotates each shift, but the company officers are not in the rotation. Also, not 100% sure if someone from each unit in the Engine & Truck houses does the watch each night or if it's just one person from either unit in those double houses.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Squad1LT View Post
    I asked about if any depts have to hear every call over there speakers all night long a couple years ago and very few did. We still with around 10,000 calls coming over the radio have to listen to radio traffic all night long. Now they will say which company goes but you still are not sleeping very well with radio traffic. With the studies out about sleep and how important it is, are there NFPA standards addressing selective dispatch? My dept only likes to follow NFPA when it is convienent for them though.
    Although it will not encourage you, I believe this is a fairly simple and relativel inexpensive fix. All you need are two tone sequential decoders that identify station radios or pagers. The radio or pager can remain in a charger and be hooked to an amplified station alerting system.

    Your tones drop, your speakers open until someone goes and hits the reset button on the pager. Not rocket science.

    Is all of your dispatching now strictly by voice or is there any kind of alert or tone prior to a broadcast?
    RK
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    Comments made are my own. They do not represent the official position or opinion of the Fire Department or the City for which I am employed. In fact, they are normally exactly the opposite.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MemphisE34a View Post
    Although it will not encourage you, I believe this is a fairly simple and relativel inexpensive fix. All you need are two tone sequential decoders that identify station radios or pagers. The radio or pager can remain in a charger and be hooked to an amplified station alerting system.

    Your tones drop, your speakers open until someone goes and hits the reset button on the pager. Not rocket science.

    Is all of your dispatching now strictly by voice or is there any kind of alert or tone prior to a broadcast?
    Ours are in a system that opens a station alert signal, speakers through out and lights in the bunk room. All are on timers and completly reset in 2 minutes. You are right very simple, we have had it since the late 1980's
    Am I being effective in my efforts or am I merely showing up in my fireman costume to watch a house burn down? (Joe Brown, www.justlookingbusy.wordpress.com)

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    if it aint broke dont fix it

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    there is a tone that goes off first then the dispatcher gets on and dispatches. Although for first alarms (fires) they say first alarm then tone then give the dispatch. I need to look up or call Motorola but our radio in the station is a Motorola XTL 1500. There is probably a big button down at dispatch that say selective dispatch you just flip it, but that would be asking too much and plus weve been doing it this way. I don't mind getting hurt doing the job etc.. kind of comes with doing the job right, but something like this that is an easy fix ****es me off.

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