1. #1
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    Default Rescue Chain Inspection

    I am in the process of creating an inspection form for our chain for my department. My form includes: serial number of the chain, length, inner link wear, gouges, cuts/nicks, bent links, heat damage, and the conditions of the attached hooks. This is to be done annually in our department. If there is anything I should add to this form or if anyone has a link available to the forms they use, I would like to take a look at it. I am recommending the chain that we currently have be taken out of service because we have no records on it. We are also in the process of ordering new chain. Thank you in advance for your help.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NCfire View Post
    I am in the process of creating an inspection form for our chain for my department. My form includes: serial number of the chain, length, inner link wear, gouges, cuts/nicks, bent links, heat damage, and the conditions of the attached hooks. This is to be done annually in our department. If there is anything I should add to this form or if anyone has a link available to the forms they use, I would like to take a look at it. I am recommending the chain that we currently have be taken out of service because we have no records on it. We are also in the process of ordering new chain. Thank you in advance for your help.
    HOW are you going to "record" the Serial #'s of your chain UNLESS you are buying CERTIFIED ( Tagged)assemblies? And they are rather Pricey depending on size and GRADE (80,100,120). ANY chain used for Rescue should be a minimum of Grade 80(or 8 ).Outside of that you've covered the baselines. Keep the chain CLEAN and lubed so it doesn't rust/corrode. If you want CERTIFIED assemblies,that's fine but if you get a handle on date acquired.grade and maintain it as you've laid out you will have a working record. The CERTIFIED assemblies are NOT required for work BUT a MINIMUM of Grade 80 IS required for ANY overhead lifting. T.C.

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    I am in the overhead lifting business and we do industrial crane inspections for companies. If you want to take the guess work out of it you can take your chains, slings etc to you local sling company and for a small fee they will recertify them and affix an inspection tag showing the date and load information. Our local sling company charges around 20.00 per chain but that differs per size and whether it is overhead lifting or not. Every companies pricing is different and some will come onsite and do the inspection others you will have to deliver and pick up.

    For the most part the items you listed to check is what they will do as well as checking for chain stretch. They more than likely will not load test the chain unless you request it and then there would be another fee. The good thing about having a local sling company certify the chain is that it takes the guess work off of the guys using the chain. An outside company will not let you put in service a chain that is not able to perform safely.
    Also for your records when you purchase chain you should ask for a copy of the chain certificate. Every piece of chain made has a certificate for that run. Every few links the manufacturer stamps a serial number on the side of the link that will match the chain certificate. When your vendor orders the chain they get a copy of that certificate when requested.

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    Thank you both for you your replies. Rescue101 sorry for the confusion of my post, I was making card for each truck and you would be able to list all chain that is on each rig on one card.

    Yes we will be buying new certified chain, if we have the money in our budget I feel that is the way to go. The chain we currently have has no records of inspection ect.

    If we donít have the money and buy non certified chain and keep a record with this be enough to cover our tails in court (you never know when someone will file a lawsuit).

    Bbeck that is a great idea I never thought of that, I will have to look and see if there are any places near us that do that.

    Thanks again to the both of you for your great advice.

    Stay safe!

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    Quite alright. I use chains everyday and some have serial #'s,some are OLDER(but servicable)with NO serial #'s. Until recently,they were only GRADE stamped and even that gets hard to read after awhile. The CERTIFIED assemblies with the tags make it a LOT easier. In traveling around the country,I've found that there is a GREAT deal of confusion/misinformation about Chain,particularly Rescue rated chain. T.C.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bbeck View Post
    I am in the overhead lifting business and we do industrial crane inspections for companies. If you want to take the guess work out of it you can take your chains, slings etc to you local sling company and for a small fee they will recertify them and affix an inspection tag showing the date and load information. Our local sling company charges around 20.00 per chain but that differs per size and whether it is overhead lifting or not. Every companies pricing is different and some will come onsite and do the inspection others you will have to deliver and pick up.

    For the most part the items you listed to check is what they will do as well as checking for chain stretch. They more than likely will not load test the chain unless you request it and then there would be another fee. The good thing about having a local sling company certify the chain is that it takes the guess work off of the guys using the chain. An outside company will not let you put in service a chain that is not able to perform safely.
    Also for your records when you purchase chain you should ask for a copy of the chain certificate. Every piece of chain made has a certificate for that run. Every few links the manufacturer stamps a serial number on the side of the link that will match the chain certificate. When your vendor orders the chain they get a copy of that certificate when requested.
    I have a couple questions. Been a few years since I bought any chain that weren't made up assemblies so: When did they start stamping the serial on the links and is this true of ALL chain Mfgs? As best I can determine,I don't see it on any of my new ones and YES they are USA chain. Thanks,T.C.

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