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  1. #1
    Forum Member rescuedylan's Avatar
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    Default Utilizing the arborist line for rescue

    Most rescuers that have never done tree work or seen an arborist setup might find their self taking un needed extra steps when in a rescue. Understanding and utilizing when possible the arborist climbing setup can save time and energy. The majority of arborist utilize a 1:1 system, having one end of the climbing line tied into the harness and the other end running over a branch and back down to a hitch attached to them. The rest of the line running freely to the ground not anchored in order for the climber to move freely ascending and descending.

    By simply locking off the running end of the climbers line at ground level will stop the climber from mistakenly lowering his/her self possibly causing further problems for the rescuer. Also now the ground crew will be able to take control of raising the arborist 's weight off of the hitch or out of a V where branches come together causing a pinch point. At this point the rescue crew will have a few options to look at for bringing the arborist down.
    1. Attaching a pickoff strap to the arborist and keeping his/her hitch on the line using that as the control for them.
    2. Locking off the arborist's line at the ground, pulling down on thier hitch, removing it and having the ground crew lower.
    3. Bringing up another line to be attached to the arborist setting up a new overhead, and removing the arborist from his/her line.

    All this does depend on the arborist rope and its condition, but dont discount using what is already there in place allowing the rescuer to save time by having less steps to take. Also keep in mind large hanging branches (widow maker)that are set to fall, the arborist is in the tree for a reason and that may be the reason.


  2. #2
    Forum Member jdcalamia's Avatar
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    Default

    Any pictures or video of this setup in use?
    John D. Calamia, BS, NREMTP, FP-C
    Firefighter/Flight Paramedic
    Broomall, PA

  3. #3
    Forum Member rescuedylan's Avatar
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    Default

    I will get some pics for you. I dont have any vid, but can make some up.

  4. #4
    Moderator ProgressiveRescue's Avatar
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    Default

    Here's one of many videos I found on youtube. Looks like an overhead was used to perform a line transfer. It's a little tough to see what's going on but it gave me a clue or two. This is a new monster to me so any footage you can provide Dylan would be great.
    Mike Donahue


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M_PQ9...eature=related
    "Training Prepares You...For Moments That Define You

  5. #5
    Forum Member rescuedylan's Avatar
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    Default

    That was good example of keeping the arborist on his/her own hitch while the rescuer connect to them using a pick off strap. That was video of a tree climbing compatition.
    The first pic attached is of a Distel hitched minded by a hitch climber pulley. what happens is as the climber pulles down on the end going to the hitch he/sh will pull them self up. They can tend the line as they go, have someone on the ground do it for them or climb a few feet hold them self with one hand and tend with the other. pulley keeping the hitch in place as they would pull down on the tail going to the ground. Picture that tail going to the ground being locked of by the rescue crew on the ground. The victim would be unable to move downward then. Now think, if you are to place a MA at the ground level on the tail it would then give you control to pull the victim up while still giving the rescue crew a double safety factor. The first safety is the one the crew makes on the ground the second is the hitch originaly holding the victim ( that is to say it has not be compramised in any way). The fastest and I would think most contraversal method of getting a arborist with this setup down, is to have a rescuer go to the vicitim place a micro pulley above there hitch, attach a line that goes to the ground to that and someone on the ground " gently " pulls down. This will release the hitch slowly bring the victim to the ground controlled. It only works when there is nothing under them to get in the way and there alot of people that say there is just too much lack of control in this method. Personaly I like being right with the victim and having some kind of control as to when they move and dont.

    Not to throw anyone off with this but here is another method of climbing that arborist including myself will use when they dont trust an overhead or need more balance while in working in a tree. It is called a M rig. Works great and allows for a climber to be able to have more balance and get further out into a canopy.
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