1. #1
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    Default The ridiculous training scenario

    At one point in all of our lives we will here someone say to another " this training is ridiculous, we will never have to do this in real life". This all most always coming from the one crew member that has something to say about everything. I will always have looked forward to that training, it gives me a chance to think outside the box more, and pushes the crew to think more then two steps ahead.

    One training idea I have come up with is a adding gear as you go drill. Give your crew a chain of objectives to complete. Start them with the least amount of gear to start with and as they complete each objective add one piece of equipment for them to use. As each objective is met the next will get harder. This is not to be a timed event due to it is a thinking skill. Of course prior to sending the crew to do this you will have to think out each point along the way to make sure that they will be able to complete them with what they have.

    Does your teams train only on the obvious or do your team leaders throw in curve balls every once in awhile?

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    Default Curve Balls

    We all know that when you train it's in a perfect world. When actually use the training on a response it is usually performed unlike you trained. It is great to have the trainer throw a few curve balls at you to see how you would react in a testing mode.
    There are no stupid or ridiculous drills as just when you think it is...BAMM you have the scenario in front of you.
    Respectfully,
    Jay Dudley
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    Dylan,

    Can you give us an example of a typical drill like this that you would run?
    John D. Calamia, BS, NREMTP, FP-C
    Firefighter/Flight Paramedic
    Broomall, PA

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    Dylan,
    That's a great idea! I often throw curveballs into my training programs, I think it feeds the students think outside the box mentality we as instructors try so hard to help them develop or refine.
    Something I like to do when training on MAS, anchor systems, belays and knots is have the students perform the skill once then perform it again under black out conditions. This forces them to use the mental picture in their head, their sense of touch and utilize communication skills within their team. Students are always amazed when they perform these skills under these conditions and I believe it only sharpens their skills overall.
    Thanks,
    Mike Donahue
    "Training Prepares You...For Moments That Define You

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    Start out with something basic and with very little gear. This will all depend on what you have to work with. Start with a basic ascent station. Crew will have their harness, two lines (main & belay), three prussic cords and two bieners. Each member will ascend then send down the gear for the next crew member. If the crew desides to raise crew members that is fine but they get no extra gear till the second station. Safety will be up to the officers running the drill, they (officers) get what ever they need to provide good safety. After this is done with all members on top, give them an added piece of equipment and have them lower a load down to the bottom but have to raise it back up. Durring the same station have all members descend back down. After done add one piece of equipment. Have them move onto a confind space below grade station. Have this be a non entry station. so on and so on...

    You can make it as hard as you want. My personal favorite is at the end giving them an object that is too heavy to be moved by hand. Have them find a way to move the objects around a course where they will have to build a bridge, a lifting system and lowering system. If at all possable have the course go thru a body of water. Give them an asortment of lumber and plywood to help move the object. Key to this station is the team finding out that they can beat the friction by wetting down the lumber they use as tracks. They can go from moving in 4ft pulls to 16ft pulls. Use a weight of 1000 lbs to 2000lbs, this will guaranty the team will have to work together to move the object and build a system to do so. If you have a beach area to do this it is even better!

    Again the pre plan is key and allowing the team to make their mistakes and solve them own their own will build inner team confidence.

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    Default

    Mike, I couldnt agree more. Blackout conditions no matter what always adds that extra insentive to pay attention to detail.

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    I like it, especially the black out conditions. Anyone can do this stuff when you can see!
    John D. Calamia, BS, NREMTP, FP-C
    Firefighter/Flight Paramedic
    Broomall, PA

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    Quote Originally Posted by jdcalamia View Post
    I like it, especially the black out conditions. Anyone can do this stuff when you can see!
    You hit that nail on the head!
    "Training Prepares You...For Moments That Define You

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    I'm typically a lurker on the forum but wanted to throw this out for consideration....

    Many teams have highly skilled members that they "go to" for all the challenging problems.

    I "remove" that person from the problem, "Oh, no! Joe just got hit with a rock and is unconscious!", to see how they adapt.

    Now they have another patient AND have to solve the problem without Joe.

    Strong teams handle this kind of issue without missing a beat. Weaker teams can have real problems.

    Stuff happens on real calls. No one has ever said that it isn't realistic.

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    I have had that person removed before as an on looker, I will have to make them the patient of an accident.... I like it, great add!!

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    The other fun thing twist is to run the same problem but require alternative solutions each time.

    If you did it with a 3:1 do it with a 4:1 this time.

    You can also eliminate the obvious bomber anchor that everyone gravitates toward. Force people out of their comfort zone. Ultimately you get more skilled rescuers with larger comfort zones.

    My one caveat is that the above is best with skilled folks. People that are really green and just getting the basics down can easily get overwhelmed and confused. This can be managed effectively but you need to be aware of it.

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    Dylan, I went to a great course up in Canada a few years back. They work in the snow and mud quite a bit and tend to loose gear if it's dropped onto the ground. The little twist they put into the training was if you put gear on the ground it was gone/taken by the instructor. Each person started the day with a set amount of gear and we each rigged off of one another. You would be surprised on how much stuff people would set down instead of stowing it. Things would get very interesting with about 50% less gear by the end of the day. I still find myself trying not to place gear on the ground to this day. Also, it's amazing how much life sucks if your working lines are wet. Since most of us don't train in the rain, we don't have much experience with increase in friction due to wet rope. You don't hear the motto "if it ain't raining we ain't training" very much.

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    Great point, " If it aint raining, we aint training!" words that was drilled into my head when I was in the Army. That is something I will have to throw into the mix, one big tub of water with all the ropes and cords in it! Great thought!!

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