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Thread: 5" Hose Repair

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    Default 5" Hose Repair

    Hey there all. We have some Angus 5" hose that is in need of repair. We are unable to find a place locally to repair it and are unable to repair the wholes ourselves. Know of any kit to get the job done?? Thanks!

    Jonathan


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    MembersZone Subscriber tree68's Avatar
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    Have you contacted Angus?
    Opinions my own. Standard disclaimers apply.

    Everyone goes home. Safety begins with you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jfinen View Post
    Hey there all. We have some Angus 5" hose that is in need of repair. We are unable to find a place locally to repair it and are unable to repair the wholes ourselves. Know of any kit to get the job done?? Thanks!

    Jonathan
    We simply cut the hose back past the holes if they were within 5' of the coupling. Anything beyond that, it got tossed. That was when we used Hi-Vol hose. Monthly hose change kept that practice to a minimum.
    IAFF

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    Tree68 - They used to be able to get repair kits out of the UK, but no longer can and do not have a repair strategy. Thank you!
    Last edited by jfinen; 01-03-2011 at 06:56 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by snowball View Post
    We simply cut the hose back past the holes if they were within 5' of the coupling. Anything beyond that, it got tossed. That was when we used Hi-Vol hose. Monthly hose change kept that practice to a minimum.
    That is the same hose we have, and some of the holes are in locations where cutting it back isn't a $$ prudent option. Thank, you!

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    Forum Member snowball's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jfinen View Post
    That is the same hose we have, and some of the holes are in locations where cutting it back isn't a $$ prudent option. Thank, you!
    I've never heard of a patch for that. We never paid any attention to pinholes as that particular hose wouldn't burst at or just above hydrant pressure.
    IAFF

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    RedHead makes bolt on couplings that are field replacable with a torque wrench and allen wrench. Up side is you can have same length of hose in two pieces. Down side, you have two pieces of hose to make same length as one did before. Still less costly than a new section of hose.
    Last edited by LFD2203; 01-03-2011 at 08:19 PM. Reason: clarification

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    Has anyone ever tried sleeving for a temporary fix?

    I got this idea from a local agricultural company that uses the same exact Angus hose that we did, except they used 6" instead of 5".

    Cut a 1' section from an old hose and slide it into place over the damaged area. When the hose is charged it seals tight to the outer sleeve. Of course the coupling must be removed.

    It works best if the hose is sleeved before it is put into service, just position a sleeve at each end. This keeps the hose from bending too tight at the coupling during storage. When a leak develops relieve the pressure from the hose ( no need to fully drain ) grab the edge of the nearest sleeve w/ a couple pair of vice grips and drag it into place over the leak. Easier and quicker than changing out a hose when you need it the most.

    The ag company used sleeves for a permanent fix. I think I'd rather repair or replace the hose as soon as possible.
    We do not rise to the occasion. We fall back to our level of training.

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    You may have a couple of options. If they're bolt-on couplings on the non-jacketed hose, they're pretty easy to get on and off, as was mentioned above. Even if they aren't, you can get them from other manufacturers that should fit the hose.

    A bit part of what you may have to do likely depends on where the leak is. If it's near an end, you can cut it out and recouple it. If it's in the middle, you may be left with making two short sections and use them as shorties or as fill hoses.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Catch22 View Post
    If it's in the middle, you may be left with making two short sections and use them as shorties or as fill hoses.
    There's something to be said for having a short section or two available. We've got a 25 footer- comes in handy when you need 20 or so feet and don't want to have an extra 75' to deal with.
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    Years back when we went to SnapTite LDH and received all the new hose line, we also received some blow out type patches.

    This is similar to what was once used in garages. It is about 3 inches in diameter and has a piece, tab, about two inches long. You rub a string in the hose in the hose to the coupling. Then you tie that string to the patch and apply some adhesive. You pull the strip back to the hold in which you inserted it and the tab end of the blow out patch is pulled through the hold. Then you hold this for a few minutes until the patch adheres to the inside of the hose.

    A clamp can be applied to help bind the patch to the inside.
    We have actually used this several times. Of course if the hold is larger and the hose is old, then it may be more prudent to cut the hose where the hold is and make a couple of short utility or make up lines.
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