1. #1
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    N.W. Iowa
    Posts
    196

    Default Rural ISO Ratings

    I am looking for some ideas of how or where to start to see if we can lower our rural ISO rating. We are currently looking at replacing our 30 plus year old 750/750 pumper with a tanker/pumper. I am wondering if this is the right way to go in order to accomplish this. I know it is based on how much water you can continously flow but I do not know what the formual is or where to look for more information.

  2. #2
    MembersZone Subscriber
    LVFD301's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    3,967

  3. #3
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Golden City 1 hour south of fort smith
    Posts
    544

    Default

    One of the biggest things you need to know is to have all the yearly tests completed and records for them, such as pump test, hose test etc. Then figure out if you are able to pump 250 gpm for 2 hours 5 minutes after you get to a scene. Now this can be done with hydrants or water shuttle. My district is 34 sq miles of rural area with only 5 hydrant but we have many pond with dry hydrant in them.
    A great way to make sure you have enough woman is to have several other departments that surround you sign automatic aid agreements and start practicing working together. This has been a huge benefit for us. When we have a structure fire with automatic aid we have 12,000 gallons of water coming to the scene. We have a 1,000 gallons on the pumper and a 2,000 gallon tanker so we could last for 6 minutes before we have to start using water from some one else. then after we start shuttling water the 12,000 gallon gives us 48 minutes.
    We are also working on lowering our ISO but we have to few firefighters right now so were in a big recruiting phase right now. The web sites above are a great source. I just gave you a few ideas for thought. It's really now as hard as most departments think. But it is alot of papper work and training.

  4. #4
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    N.W. Iowa
    Posts
    196

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by volfireman034 View Post
    One of the biggest things you need to know is to have all the yearly tests completed and records for them, such as pump test, hose test etc. Then figure out if you are able to pump 250 gpm for 2 hours 5 minutes after you get to a scene. Now this can be done with hydrants or water shuttle. My district is 34 sq miles of rural area with only 5 hydrant but we have many pond with dry hydrant in them.
    A great way to make sure you have enough woman is to have several other departments that surround you sign automatic aid agreements and start practicing working together. This has been a huge benefit for us. When we have a structure fire with automatic aid we have 12,000 gallons of water coming to the scene. We have a 1,000 gallons on the pumper and a 2,000 gallon tanker so we could last for 6 minutes before we have to start using water from some one else. then after we start shuttling water the 12,000 gallon gives us 48 minutes.
    We are also working on lowering our ISO but we have to few firefighters right now so were in a big recruiting phase right now. The web sites above are a great source. I just gave you a few ideas for thought. It's really now as hard as most departments think. But it is alot of papper work and training.
    We have been doing our annual hose testing and pump testing. I am mostly concerned with what we need to look at for rural ratings, we are at a ten right now. We cover 94 sq. miles and we can respond with our pumper with 1000 gal., tanker with 1800 gal.. We have three 5000 gal. tanker's all within ten miles of our station for mutual aid. I did the math for your numbers above, 250 gpm for 2 hrs. 5 minutes. 250 gpm for 125 minutes if my math is right is 31,250 gal. of water needed?? Am I thinking right on this?

  5. #5
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Bossier Parrish, Louisiana
    Posts
    10,610

    Default

    You sound like a department with limited resources.

    My advice would be to talk to your ISO representative and ask him what you could do that would give you the greatest improvement for the amount of money and member's time you have available.

  6. #6
    Forum Member
    FyredUp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 1999
    Location
    Rural Wisconsin, Retired from the burbs of Milwaukee
    Posts
    10,108

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LaFireEducator View Post
    You sound like a department with limited resources.

    My advice would be to talk to your ISO representative and ask him what you could do that would give you the greatest improvement for the amount of money and member's time you have available.
    They could set up a drill with their mutual aid companies and see how much water they can actuall flow. Maybe the 250 gpm for 125 minutes would be a piece of cake for them.

    Or they could wallow in self pity and do the absolute minimum as you suggest.
    Crazy, but that's how it goes
    Millions of people living as foes
    Maybe it's not too late
    To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

  7. #7
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Bossier Parrish, Louisiana
    Posts
    10,610

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FyredUp View Post
    They could set up a drill with their mutual aid companies and see how much water they can actuall flow. Maybe the 250 gpm for 125 minutes would be a piece of cake for them.

    Or they could wallow in self pity and do the absolute minimum as you suggest.
    And where exactly did I say that they wallow?

    I guess to me it makes sense to consult the folks that actually do the rating when it comes to finding out ways they can improve their rating in the most cost effective ways possible.

    I'm silly like that.

    It's very possible that what you suggest may bean effective use of time. Likely there are other ways that the ISO rep will to suggest based on their specific situation.

  8. #8
    MembersZone Subscriber
    LVFD301's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    3,967

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JSMV72 View Post
    We have been doing our annual hose testing and pump testing. I am mostly concerned with what we need to look at for rural ratings, we are at a ten right now. We cover 94 sq. miles and we can respond with our pumper with 1000 gal., tanker with 1800 gal.. We have three 5000 gal. tanker's all within ten miles of our station for mutual aid. I did the math for your numbers above, 250 gpm for 2 hrs. 5 minutes. 250 gpm for 125 minutes if my math is right is 31,250 gal. of water needed?? Am I thinking right on this?
    While 250 GPM is a figure used in rural areas a lot, it can be different, depending on your needed fire flow NFF.

    Your best route, go to the web pages I mentioned, get an inspection scheduled NOW for a 9, it sounds like you will have no problem at all with that. Very very minimum requirements. While the inspector is there (if he even shows up and does not do the inspection by telephone) talk to him about your specific situation and what can be done to drop it even lower.

    It sounds like you have a 9 already done as long as you have some sort of truck, some sort of dispatch method, a few hand tools, and a training program.

    But go ahead and do a service to your patrons, get the 9 inspection scheduled.

  9. #9
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Golden City 1 hour south of fort smith
    Posts
    544

    Default

    LVFD301 is totally right. You are proabbly a class 9 now and don't know it. Look on the ISO web site and double check the requirements. Then work your way to a lower rating. This will show the people in your fire district that you are trying to lower your rating and they may be willing to help you decrease it even more.

    Minimum Requirements for
    Class 9 Protection
    In order to be considered for Class 9 protection, the following minimum facilities must be available:

    A. Organization
    The fire department shall be organized on a permanent basis under applicable state or local laws. The organization shall include one person responsible for operation of the department, usually with the title of chief. The fire department must serve an area with definite boundaries. If a city is not served by a fire department solely operated by or for the governing body of that city, the fire department providing such service shall do so under a legal contract or resolution. When a fire department's service area involves one or more cities, a contract should be executed with each city served.

    B. Membership
    The fire department shall have sufficient membership to assure the response of at least four members to alarms. The "alarms" considered are first alarms for fires in structures. The chief may be one of the responding members.

    C. Training
    Training for active members shall be conducted at least two hours every two months.

    D. Alarm Notification
    Alarm facilities and arrangement shall be such that there is no delay in the receipt of alarms and the dispatch of firefighters and apparatus.

    E. Apparatus
    The fire department shall have at least one piece of apparatus meeting the general criteria of NFPA 1901, Automotive Fire Apparatus. The apparatus shall have a permanently mounted pump capable of delivering 50 G.P.M. or more at 150 P.S.I. and a water tank with at least 300 gallon capacity.


    F. Records
    Records should indicate date, time and location of fires, the number of responding members, meetings, training sessions, and maintenance of apparatus and equipment. A roster of fire department members should be kept up-to-date.

    G. Equipment
    The following equipment shall be provided:
    1. At least two 150' lengths of 3/4" or 1" fire department booster hose, 1-1/2" pre-connected hose, or the equivalent, each with a nozzle capable of discharging either a spray or a straight stream.
    2. Two portable fire extinguishers suitable for use on Class A, B, and C fires. The minimum size should be 20BC rating in dry chemical, 10BC rating in C02, and 2A rating in water-type extinguishers.
    3. One 12' ladder with folding hooks.
    4. One 24' extension ladder.
    5. One pick-head ax.
    6. Two electric hand lights.
    7. One pike pole.
    8. One bolt cutter.
    9. One claw tool.
    10. One crowbar.
    H. Housing
    Apparatus shall be so housed as to provide protection from the weather.

  10. #10
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    N.W. Iowa
    Posts
    196

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by volfireman034 View Post
    LVFD301 is totally right. You are proabbly a class 9 now and don't know it. Look on the ISO web site and double check the requirements. Then work your way to a lower rating. This will show the people in your fire district that you are trying to lower your rating and they may be willing to help you decrease it even more.

    Minimum Requirements for
    Class 9 Protection
    In order to be considered for Class 9 protection, the following minimum facilities must be available:

    A. Organization
    The fire department shall be organized on a permanent basis under applicable state or local laws. The organization shall include one person responsible for operation of the department, usually with the title of chief. The fire department must serve an area with definite boundaries. If a city is not served by a fire department solely operated by or for the governing body of that city, the fire department providing such service shall do so under a legal contract or resolution. When a fire department's service area involves one or more cities, a contract should be executed with each city served.

    B. Membership
    The fire department shall have sufficient membership to assure the response of at least four members to alarms. The "alarms" considered are first alarms for fires in structures. The chief may be one of the responding members.

    C. Training
    Training for active members shall be conducted at least two hours every two months.

    D. Alarm Notification
    Alarm facilities and arrangement shall be such that there is no delay in the receipt of alarms and the dispatch of firefighters and apparatus.

    E. Apparatus
    The fire department shall have at least one piece of apparatus meeting the general criteria of NFPA 1901, Automotive Fire Apparatus. The apparatus shall have a permanently mounted pump capable of delivering 50 G.P.M. or more at 150 P.S.I. and a water tank with at least 300 gallon capacity.


    F. Records
    Records should indicate date, time and location of fires, the number of responding members, meetings, training sessions, and maintenance of apparatus and equipment. A roster of fire department members should be kept up-to-date.

    G. Equipment
    The following equipment shall be provided:
    1. At least two 150' lengths of 3/4" or 1" fire department booster hose, 1-1/2" pre-connected hose, or the equivalent, each with a nozzle capable of discharging either a spray or a straight stream.
    2. Two portable fire extinguishers suitable for use on Class A, B, and C fires. The minimum size should be 20BC rating in dry chemical, 10BC rating in C02, and 2A rating in water-type extinguishers.
    3. One 12' ladder with folding hooks.
    4. One 24' extension ladder.
    5. One pick-head ax.
    6. Two electric hand lights.
    7. One pike pole.
    8. One bolt cutter.
    9. One claw tool.
    10. One crowbar.
    H. Housing
    Apparatus shall be so housed as to provide protection from the weather.
    I guess if that is what it takes I don't know why we are at a ten for rural. We currently at a 7.5 in town with only a few points needed to go to a six. We currently have a very well equiped and trained dept. We have 19 active members with 14 FF1 and 5 FF2. We have new turnout gear, SCBA, all new LDH, nozzles, ground monitor, attack hose etc. thanks to four AFG grants. I think it has been some time since our last inspection, I really believe our current chief is just not willing to put in the time. One reason I am trying to find our what we need is because we are currently looking at replace our 30 year old 750/750 pumper. We are looking at a new tanker pumper. And the guys are thinking about a unit that would only carry 1500 gal. but with a 1250 pump. I think we could show the public that we are looking at reducing their insurance cost maybe if we look at something that would carry more water, since we already have one fully equiped 1250 pump, the only thing it does lack is foam and its 1998 unit.

  11. #11
    MembersZone Subscriber
    LVFD301's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    3,967

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JSMV72 View Post
    I guess if that is what it takes I don't know why we are at a ten for rural. We currently at a 7.5 in town with only a few points needed to go to a six. We currently have a very well equiped and trained dept. We have 19 active members with 14 FF1 and 5 FF2. We have new turnout gear, SCBA, all new LDH, nozzles, ground monitor, attack hose etc. thanks to four AFG grants. I think it has been some time since our last inspection, I really believe our current chief is just not willing to put in the time. One reason I am trying to find our what we need is because we are currently looking at replace our 30 year old 750/750 pumper. We are looking at a new tanker pumper. And the guys are thinking about a unit that would only carry 1500 gal. but with a 1250 pump. I think we could show the public that we are looking at reducing their insurance cost maybe if we look at something that would carry more water, since we already have one fully equiped 1250 pump, the only thing it does lack is foam and its 1998 unit.
    Is it a mileage thing? Are your rural areas over 5 miles from your fire station?

    It is nice to have a backup pumper, if you went with a pumper/tanker like the 1500/1250. My department has two engines, so on our tankers I use small or no pumps.

  12. #12
    MembersZone Subscriber
    tree68's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Jefferson County, NY USA
    Posts
    2,292

    Default

    Make sure you can actually use a big truck. If you've got all good roads and have room to maneuver, that tandem axle 1250/3000 makes sense. But if it's narrow, winding roads and tight driveways, it may be more of a hindrence.

    That's not to say that you can't alter your SOPs to fit the capabilities of the new truck. Just that you need to consider all the angles.

    While lots of pump capacity is always a good thing (and can affect your ISO), consider how often you'll actually need to flow more than 1250 GPM, or even 1000.
    Opinions my own. Standard disclaimers apply.

    Everyone goes home. Safety begins with you.

  13. #13
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Bossier Parrish, Louisiana
    Posts
    10,610

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tree68 View Post
    Make sure you can actually use a big truck. If you've got all good roads and have room to maneuver, that tandem axle 1250/3000 makes sense. But if it's narrow, winding roads and tight driveways, it may be more of a hindrence.

    That's not to say that you can't alter your SOPs to fit the capabilities of the new truck. Just that you need to consider all the angles.

    While lots of pump capacity is always a good thing (and can affect your ISO), consider how often you'll actually need to flow more than 1250 GPM, or even 1000.
    Going abit farther, what is the required flow of your largest non-sprinklered structure?

    Does ISO still not utilize flow data for sprinklered structures with documented testing within the past year? It's been awhile since I worked in an ISO state.

  14. #14
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    441

    Default

    Your city equipment allowed to leave city limits. If not then need to start with appropiate "rural" pumper. Then tanker capacity, yours and/mutual aid. "Standard" pumper in any mfg program line is a 1250 or 1500gpm and 1000gal.

    Might consider the 1500gpm as minimal upcharge and likely to help with in city fire flow. Going over 1000gal booster tank may sound simple/no brainer but what is 500gal going to do for you and it is going to cost a lot of $. 1000gal will give you a fast hit while you get your portatank/tankers dumping (and 4min@250gm/ISO). 2nd can stay under $175k.

  15. #15
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    N.W. Iowa
    Posts
    196

    Default

    Thanks for all of the input. Looks like we have some thinking to do in order to decide what would be the most beneficial.


    Here are answers to some of the questions asked above.

    Our new pumper city truck is allowed to leave the city limits for rural and mutual aid calls. The farthest distance from our station that is located in the west central part of our district would be about ten miles. We cover about 94 sq miles. N.W. Iowa is rural farming area. The rural roads are gravel, but mostly straight in one mile increments, a bit hilly with some narrow drives. But most of the farmers today have huge equipment and have increased the size of their drive ways. Yes it would be nice to keep the cost of a second unit down. The way we have it spec right now it came in around 270K. That was a 1250/1500 with class A foam, 10 inch rear dump, two door commercial chassis, two cross lays, one 2.5 inch pre-connect.

  16. #16
    MembersZone Subscriber
    tree68's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Jefferson County, NY USA
    Posts
    2,292

    Default

    If you can pull it off, go with four door chassis. Four people arriving on scene can do so much more than two.
    Opinions my own. Standard disclaimers apply.

    Everyone goes home. Safety begins with you.

  17. #17
    MembersZone Subscriber
    LVFD301's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    3,967

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JSMV72 View Post
    Thanks for all of the input. Looks like we have some thinking to do in order to decide what would be the most beneficial.


    Here are answers to some of the questions asked above.

    Our new pumper city truck is allowed to leave the city limits for rural and mutual aid calls. The farthest distance from our station that is located in the west central part of our district would be about ten miles
    Your ISO rating will be for 5 road miles from a station. Beyond that will stay a 10.

  18. #18
    Forum Member
    Rescue101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Bridgton,Me USA
    Posts
    8,162

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LVFD301 View Post
    Your ISO rating will be for 5 road miles from a station. Beyond that will stay a 10.
    Not here. 9 at 7 miles and that is without trying to improve it. T.C.

  19. #19
    MembersZone Subscriber
    LVFD301's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    3,967

    Default

    I should have mentioned, some states have mandated changes in ISO rating, such as Texas, some western states, and possibly Maine?

    Normally it is a 5 mile thing however.

    Dang woodchucks.

  20. #20
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    72

    Default ISO Slayer

    I commend you on trying to improve your ISO rating... You can go to our web site and download our free book on ISO.... We have numerous departments that have used our services and several that have lowered their rating on their own with the use of our book... We also provide free quotes....
    David
    ISO Slayer

    www.isoslayer.com

  21. #21
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    441

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JSMV72 View Post
    Thanks for all of the input. Looks like we have some thinking to do in order to decide what would be the most beneficial.


    Here are answers to some of the questions asked above.

    Our new pumper city truck is allowed to leave the city limits for rural and mutual aid calls. The farthest distance from our station that is located in the west central part of our district would be about ten miles. We cover about 94 sq miles. N.W. Iowa is rural farming area. The rural roads are gravel, but mostly straight in one mile increments, a bit hilly with some narrow drives. But most of the farmers today have huge equipment and have increased the size of their drive ways. Yes it would be nice to keep the cost of a second unit down. The way we have it spec right now it came in around 270K. That was a 1250/1500 with class A foam, 10 inch rear dump, two door commercial chassis, two cross lays, one 2.5 inch pre-connect.
    As above - your city rating will apply up to 5mi from the station. IF you show up with sufficient water.

    You have a capable pumper available to respond so what you need is additional water. Spend the $ on tanker capacity. 50% of IOS is water. Very few areas in NW Iowa would present a problem getting a big taker around give then equipment farmers run down the road. Might look at a Water Master vac tanker. Good value tanker capability. Can utilize all those streams and ponds. 4000gal IH7400 twinscrew no pump will run you around $215k. That will have an impact on your rural ISO rating. If you REALLY feel you need a discharge pump can add a 500gpm PTO for $23k or a 1250gpm midship for $35k. A few add ons and still will be under $270k.

    If you need a 2nd pumper on scene get if from mutual aid.

  22. #22
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    SW MO
    Posts
    4,249

    Default

    I keep seeing it, and though it's minor, I wanted to clarify. For the rural water flow test it's 250 gpm for 2 hours (120 minutes). You have to start flowing within 5 minutes of arriving and sustain that flow, uninterupted, for 120 minutes. If you can bump up the flow (I believe withing 15 minutes) and sustain a higher flow (in 250 gpm increments), you can get rated for that flow.

    Auto-aid is a savior for this. If a department is auto-aid, they get counted as arriving at the same time you arrive for the test. If they're mutual aid, you must calculate travel time for them.

    There are some tricks to improving this, but the most important thing is to have a grasp of what everyone around you is capable of. While a 5,000 gallon tanker is nice, how long does it take to fill and dump? Those numbers can make you or break you.

    You can get the information from ISO to help calcuate the travel, fill, and dump times and what they're looking for. It's just a form that you fill out for each apparatus. As you do it, you might make sure everyone has a copy. If there's a group of you that can lower your rating, you can probably do the same with your neighbors.

    There's also a class 8B out there. As I remember, all it takes is an engine, 4,000 gallons of water on wheels, and four personnel responding to each fire.

  23. #23
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    N.W. Iowa
    Posts
    196

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Catch22 View Post
    I keep seeing it, and though it's minor, I wanted to clarify. For the rural water flow test it's 250 gpm for 2 hours (120 minutes). You have to start flowing within 5 minutes of arriving and sustain that flow, uninterupted, for 120 minutes. If you can bump up the flow (I believe withing 15 minutes) and sustain a higher flow (in 250 gpm increments), you can get rated for that flow.

    Auto-aid is a savior for this. If a department is auto-aid, they get counted as arriving at the same time you arrive for the test. If they're mutual aid, you must calculate travel time for them.

    There are some tricks to improving this, but the most important thing is to have a grasp of what everyone around you is capable of. While a 5,000 gallon tanker is nice, how long does it take to fill and dump? Those numbers can make you or break you.



    You can get the information from ISO to help calcuate the travel, fill, and dump times and what they're looking for. It's just a form that you fill out for each apparatus. As you do it, you might make sure everyone has a copy. If there's a group of you that can lower your rating, you can probably do the same with your neighbors.

    There's also a class 8B out there. As I remember, all it takes is an engine, 4,000 gallons of water on wheels, and four personnel responding to each fire.
    thanks catch,

    Great information. Looks like we have some thinking to do. I understand the auto aid, I have tried at our County meetings to get this across to everyone, but them seem hesitant. I also know it would all of us in this area with the AFG Grant. As far as doing water shuttle our dept. and others in this area are pretty efficient at it. We all carry jet siphons we can use to set up mulitple drop tanks to aid in reducing dump times. Maybe this spring we need to do a trial run and see what we can do.

  24. #24
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Golden City 1 hour south of fort smith
    Posts
    544

    Default

    One thing you might try with the automatic aid, with other fire districts, is to set up a trial period. Most of the fire departments in our area came up with every excuse possible not to commit to automatic aid. The excuses included 1) we're too rural and we rarely get to the house in time to put the fire out anyway. 2) we don't want to put the extra miles on our tankers. 3) We don't have the man power to send tankers, and the list went on and on. What I did was come up with a detail report on the answers to all the excuses. ( yes i was even kinda rude on the #1 excuse and said " then why are you a fire department if you not putting out house fires") Then I suggest that the county have a 1 yr "trial" period and if after one year of honestly trying to make it work they still didn't see a need for it then we would get rid of it for good. About 6 months into the trial year every department began to love auto aid and had a hard time figuring out how they ever did with out it. The fire chief really liked that fact that with in minutes of arriving at a house fire they had water just a couple minutes out. Plus the firefighters loved it because they could run more calls.

    The hardest part for us was the dispatch center. They didn't want any part of it and weren't going to change their 911 computer system. However,I fixed that problem. I came up with a laminated sheet which listed every fire department. Then next to each name I listed all the other fire departments they wanted to use for automatic aid. So... problem solved as follows: a house fire call comes into dispatch, dispatcher looks on the sheet and pages out all the fire departments listed for that area.

    Also remember that even if the tanker takes 30 to 45 minutes to get to scene, it will still count as credit for ISO. In the real world if you get to the scene and realize you don't need those tanker just cancel them. They still get credit for ISO.
    Last edited by volfireman034; 01-18-2011 at 09:20 PM. Reason: spelling

  25. #25
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    SW MO
    Posts
    4,249

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JSMV72 View Post
    thanks catch,

    Great information. Looks like we have some thinking to do. I understand the auto aid, I have tried at our County meetings to get this across to everyone, but them seem hesitant. I also know it would all of us in this area with the AFG Grant. As far as doing water shuttle our dept. and others in this area are pretty efficient at it. We all carry jet siphons we can use to set up mulitple drop tanks to aid in reducing dump times. Maybe this spring we need to do a trial run and see what we can do.
    If you're really serious, do some research. There's several articles and books out there about rural water supply, and the "Your Next ISO Rating" book on the ISO Slayer website someone posted earlier is a great resource. USFA also has a free online course that has some good material.

    Also, don't count out grants and other alternatives. While it'd be great to be able to work the grants to get a fleet of CAFS engines and vacuum tankers, you can also get other things that'll help you. We had a water supply project that got awarded a couple of years ago that included 3000' of LDH for our two engines (about 1,000 on one and 2,000 on the other), the light-weight suction hose, barrel and low-level strainers, and TurboDrafts. While we may not be able to haul as much water as some departments, we can utilize some water sources we couldn't prior to getting the grant. If you don't think you can use LDH in the rural environment, drop me an email and I'll prove you wrong.

    Up your direction, Stanley, IA has done some wonderous things with FEPP/FPP. One of their guys posts on here (NEIOWA) in the grants forum and is very knowledgable about the programs. Just a look at their website will give you an idea. At one time he was looking at using a slurry tank for a cistern, but I never heard whether he got it done or not.

    If necessary, think outside of the box. See Stanley as a fine example. Seriously, who would have ever thought of getting surplus water bladders that'll hold thousands of gallons of water to use as water supply for a rural department?

    I don't know where exactly you are in NW Iowa, but I'm sure there's some creeks, ponds, and maybe even some lakes. My dad's side of the family hails from Fonda, so I know there's a little more than hogs, corn, and beans. Maybe no much more, but a little. My wife still hates the "smell of money" from the last trip we made that way.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Greensboro Fire Department (NC)
    By MHVFD33 in forum Hiring & Employment Discussion
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 06-09-2010, 03:53 PM
  2. Improving ISO manning Rural Vol FD
    By neiowa in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 37
    Last Post: 08-28-2006, 09:02 PM
  3. Monett Rural at it again
    By 1oldfirefighter in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 06-13-2006, 04:11 PM
  4. Specifying the Location of rural hydrants
    By neiowa in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 04-23-2005, 04:01 AM
  5. Rural ISO Ratings
    By Mike C in forum Fire Politics
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 09-20-1999, 10:02 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Log in

Click here to log in or register