Why register? ...To Enhance Your Experience
+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 44
  1. #21
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Northeast Coast
    Posts
    3,821

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RoaddoggAK View Post
    Has anybody run into any problems having the pump panel on the same side of the truck as the exhaust? On the surface, it would concern me slightly that with a mid mount setup, your pump operator is standing right next to the exhaust.
    As was noted the exhaust discharges on the opposite side, but the concern in not without note as ours is very close to the wheel chock holders which has resulted in at least one arm hair clearing when one of our operator went to put back a chock and the new high exhaust temp singed him, luckily no burn. I guess that could be a benefit of the driver's side exhaust: no melting Prius's.


  2. #22
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    31

    Default

    Most all the controls now are electronic. If you did all electric valves you should be able to put the controls easily anywhere on the truck. I'm for a touch panel on the doghouse for cold weather.

  3. #23
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Northeast Coast
    Posts
    3,821

    Default

    I forgot to add that our right side rear mount panel is about as mechanical is you can get today. All valves are short push-pull (1.75" discharges) or handwheels (2.5" or greater discharges). The only electronics are the throttle, the water and foam level gauges and the foam proportioner/meters. We found that with Toyne we could have it our way and have it work well. Not all builders were as willing to work with us on this.

  4. #24
    Back In Black ChiefKN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    The Nice Part of New Jersey
    Posts
    6,981

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RKSmith163 View Post
    Most all the controls now are electronic.
    That may be true where money grows on trees....
    I am now a past chief and the views, opinions, and comments are mine and mine alone. I do not speak for any department or in any official capacity. Although, they would be smart to listen to me.

    "The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on the list."

    "When tempted to fight fire with fire, remember that the Fire Department usually uses water."

  5. #25
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    224

    Default

    One issue I haven't seen mentioned: LDH supply lines. Either OSHA or NFPA was requiring no big lines going into the operator's pump panel last I heard. Going with an officer's side panel means your supply lines are always hanging out in the street, where they block access for other rigs and invite slack jawed retreads to run over them. It removes the option of plugging them in curbside, where they're out of the way. Assuming, of course, that the fire is on the right side of the street...

    As far as the exhaust issue goes, why not just get vertical stacks?

  6. #26
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Colmar, PA
    Posts
    32

    Default

    The only RH pump panel we had was on a '49 ALF 700 series. It functioned as well as the drivers side, just had to remember to run to the other side. Had some members feel this took extra time but not a real issue. After being used to getting out of the cab and walking back to teh panel with the other units, you would occasionally see an engineer walk to the RH panel and have a weird look on his face then take off to the other side. Back then life was simple - only the 2 steamers intakes + 2 Auxilary intakes + 4 - 2.5" discharges. No plumbing nightmares.

    As noted earlier, the 2.5" max on the operators side places LDH either in the street or out the back (Front most likely will have significant FL issues). Another issue for Hale pumps is the 4" discharge opening on the casting is the RH forward opening of the casting. To get maximum flow for a 5" you may need a manifold with multiple valves to feed the LDH.

  7. #27
    Forum Member Rescue101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Bridgton,Me USA
    Posts
    8,162

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RFDACM02 View Post
    I will comment on our Toyne right/officer side pump panel. This could have be the single largest mistake we made on this truck. It's not a huge issue, but does lead to a few operational problems.

    We couldn't decide which side to go with, as it was suggested that the officers' side was further from the travel lane. Our normal would be to shut down the road all together if the truck was being pumped or equipment is being used out of the compartments (no multi-lane highways). We decided that since we'd set the truck up with the "fire side" on the officer's side and the rescue side being on the driver's side (rescue pumper) the panel would naturally be on the fire side, which also happened to have the most space available.

    The issues:
    1. We had not considered that NFPA requires the exhaust to exit on the opposite side of as the pump panel. This required a move to the driver's side which changes the in station exhaust venting. We now have only one bay this engine can sit in connected to the system, and no ability to connect while in other houses for coverage.

    2. The bigger issue is that we run a lot of EMS back-up runs, assisting the crew with lifting and extra hands on codes, unconscious, serious trauma, etc. This ends up with the engine not blocking the lane most of the time and putting the pump panel close to the snow banks (real issue this winter!) and the curb. The curb problem is that the operator has that pesky 6" trip just behind them all the time. It's real easy to back up and trip or roll your ankle when you're parked within 24" of the curb.

    3. Lastly, is the minor slowing of the operator having to pass to the opposite side of the apparatus to engage the pump when working assists. During winter months the operator engages the pump and throttles up every time he/she exits the engine, but their assigned tools are nearest the cab on their side, forcing them to double back after doing any pump work.

    In the end we'll definitely go to the driver's side on all future panels (we'll never do another top mount) just for the exhaust and curb issues.
    Hehe,SEE? We've had it RIGHT for over half a century(left MM panels). T.C.

  8. #28
    Forum Member Rescue101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Bridgton,Me USA
    Posts
    8,162

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by islandfire03 View Post
    There are many out there.
    Adam has one on their recent Crimson. It's a rear mount with panel on rt rear compartment.
    NOT Crimson..........TOYNE. Sheesh,T.C.

  9. #29
    Forum Member islandfire03's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    2,577

    Talking

    Quote Originally Posted by Rescue101 View Post
    NOT Crimson..........TOYNE. Sheesh,T.C.
    Ya ! My bad.
    I was talking to you know who and had crimson on my brain.
    We'll stay with our top mounts here >Helps to keep the engineer up out of the frozen slop and away from all the hoses.

  10. #30
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Northeast Coast
    Posts
    3,821

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nozzle nut 22 View Post
    One issue I haven't seen mentioned: LDH supply lines. Either OSHA or NFPA was requiring no big lines going into the operator's pump panel last I heard. Going with an officer's side panel means your supply lines are always hanging out in the street, where they block access for other rigs and invite slack jawed retreads to run over them. It removes the option of plugging them in curbside, where they're out of the way. Assuming, of course, that the fire is on the right side of the street...

    As far as the exhaust issue goes, why not just get vertical stacks?
    Only one of our discharges (1.75") ports out to the side of the engine, the rest are out the back and there's a 2.5" reduced with a gated wye on the front bumper. So our supply lines are all straight in the rear In fact this way it's far easier to make a hydrant than aligning a side discharge port with a hydrant steamer facing the street.

    As for vertical stacks, we already had a Magnagrip system and none of our other apparatus have vertical exhaust, so it would have been even more problematic for us.

  11. #31
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Northeast Coast
    Posts
    3,821

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rescue101 View Post
    Hehe,SEE? We've had it RIGHT for over half a century(left MM panels). T.C.
    You have me there. I guess we had it right for awhile too, but needed to re-invent the wheel, though I'm sold on the rearmount! Hey am I gonna be able to get a Big Mac over there in the Mountains or are you guys too uppity for franchises too!

  12. #32
    Forum Member Rescue101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Bridgton,Me USA
    Posts
    8,162

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RFDACM02 View Post
    You have me there. I guess we had it right for awhile too, but needed to re-invent the wheel, though I'm sold on the rearmount! Hey am I gonna be able to get a Big Mac over there in the Mountains or are you guys too uppity for franchises too!
    Oh,it goes WAY past Big Mac. IF they enact it, we're SCREWED! NOHING can grow,nothing(of any size or formula) can come in. REALLY poorly thought out. we get more than our fair share of wingbats that think they have to come to Town and do it THEIR way. Even though OUR way has worked well for over two hundred years. T.c.

  13. #33
    Forum Member Rescue101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Bridgton,Me USA
    Posts
    8,162

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by islandfire03 View Post
    Ya ! My bad.
    I was talking to you know who and had crimson on my brain.
    We'll stay with our top mounts here >Helps to keep the engineer up out of the frozen slop and away from all the hoses.
    My "other" dept has top mounts. Not so excited over 'em that we're apt to buy one anytime soon. Our operators don't stand in slop,they have pull outs. You REALLY don't get out much do you? T.C.

  14. #34
    Forum Member islandfire03's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    2,577

    Talking

    Quote Originally Posted by Rescue101 View Post
    My "other" dept has top mounts. Not so excited over 'em that we're apt to buy one anytime soon. Our operators don't stand in slop,they have pull outs. You REALLY don't get out much do you? T.C.
    I do get around actually. I even made it over to your side of the county last week on a trip through to NH. Had to run up to Conway for a friends party Tuesday evening.

    The way this winters going , you need the top mount to see over the snowbanks!

  15. #35
    Forum Member Rescue101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Bridgton,Me USA
    Posts
    8,162

    Default

    We just melt 'em down.hehe T.C.

  16. #36
    Forum Member islandfire03's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    2,577

    Talking

    Quote Originally Posted by Rescue101 View Post
    We just melt 'em down.hehe T.C.
    The houses or the snowbanks. :-}

    You guy have certainly been busy lately. I keep seeing your face on TV.

  17. #37
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    710

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RKSmith163 View Post
    I'm for a touch panel on the doghouse for cold weather.
    I'm for the pump operator freezing his buttocks off out in the weather with the rest of us.

  18. #38
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    710

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rescue101 View Post
    We just melt 'em down.hehe T.C.
    If you figure out a way to use all that exhaust regen heat to melt snow, no more snowbanks!

    C6

  19. #39
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    710

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nozzle nut 22 View Post
    One issue I haven't seen mentioned: LDH supply lines. Either OSHA or NFPA was requiring no big lines going into the operator's pump panel last I heard.
    I haven't heard of this. I'm not trying pin you down, but do you have a reference source on this?

    It would make more sense to keep discharge lines away from the operator as opposed to intakes due to higher pressures. But when do OSHA and NFPA often make sense?

    C6

  20. #40
    Forum Member Rescue101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Bridgton,Me USA
    Posts
    8,162

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by islandfire03 View Post
    The houses or the snowbanks. :-}

    You guy have certainly been busy lately. I keep seeing your face on TV.
    When you are a popular problem solver these things happen. Lucky,I only had to do ONE up close and personal. I'd rather be with my crew and let 'em catch my GOOD side. T.C.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Pump panel question.....
    By KevinFFVFD in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 40
    Last Post: 01-12-2010, 02:44 PM
  2. SOP's for Volunteer FD
    By rumlfire in forum Volunteer Forum
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 08-01-2006, 10:35 PM
  3. World Of Fire Report: 01-10-06
    By PaulBrown in forum World of Fire Daily Report
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-18-2006, 06:54 AM
  4. Standard Side-mount pump or Command side mount
    By EngCo29 in forum Apparatus Innovation
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 06-17-2005, 10:39 AM
  5. Thermal Imaging SOG's
    By wtfd92 in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 06-27-2001, 08:41 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts