1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Whocares View Post
    The phrase "The thin red line" absolutely came from the military - Battle of Balaclava...
    Didn't I just say the terms sounded the same. I'm talking about the Thin Red Line itself, on the license plates, flags, etc. Re-read my post and you might notice that. Geez, a little grasp of the English language around here would go a looooong way, .

    Edit: In case some didn't get that the last part was sarcasm, I added a wink and a smiley.
    Last edited by firefightinirish217; 04-05-2011 at 06:29 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DeputyMarshal View Post
    Agreed. Ranks right up there with "I fight what you fear" stickers...
    Yeah, I can totally see how a tag meant to honor LODD ranks right up there with a moto sticker......... You don't even know what it is.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DeputyMarshal View Post
    Agreed. Ranks right up there with "I fight what you fear" stickers...
    He fights girl scouts?

    brave man...I wish him well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by firefightinirish217 View Post
    Second, it is not intended to "junk" up your ride or signify you as a firefighter. It is displayed as a means of showing respect for those who have gone before us. Try the North Carolina Fallen Firefighters Foundation for more information on the Thin Red Line and it's origins. http://www.ncfff.org/memorial/red-line-of-courage/
    I'll show my support in other more ways.
    I am now a past chief and the views, opinions, and comments are mine and mine alone. I do not speak for any department or in any official capacity. Although, they would be smart to listen to me.

    "The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on the list."

    "When tempted to fight fire with fire, remember that the Fire Department usually uses water."

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    Quote Originally Posted by firefightinirish217 View Post
    Yeah, I can totally see how a tag meant to honor LODD ranks right up there with a moto sticker......... You don't even know what it is.
    Wow... being awfully critical of guys who didn't know it had some other meaning.

    It sure looked like it was for sale comercially, like a t-shirt. Or was that link to something else?

    http://www.emergencystuff.com/300102.html

    Gosh, no mention here.... wonder if they are even giving a piece to the charity?
    I am now a past chief and the views, opinions, and comments are mine and mine alone. I do not speak for any department or in any official capacity. Although, they would be smart to listen to me.

    "The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on the list."

    "When tempted to fight fire with fire, remember that the Fire Department usually uses water."

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChiefKN View Post
    Wow... being awfully critical of guys who didn't know it had some other meaning.

    It sure looked like it was for sale comercially, like a t-shirt. Or was that link to something else?

    http://www.emergencystuff.com/300102.html

    Gosh, no mention here.... wonder if they are even giving a piece to the charity?
    For one I gave the link to exactly what it meant before his post. Again, I gave the link to where to buy it from someone that does use it for good purposes, the North Carolina Fallen Firefighters Foundation. The link you just copied is someone elses. Regardelss as to whether someone buys one from some retailer that gives to charity or not is none of mine or your business. If they're displaying it out of respect and memory, then that's between them and their conscience, as for me, I will not buy one that does not come from the NCFFF as they are the ones that were entrusted with the original from Apex VOl. F.D.

    I wasn't being critical to anyone, except the self acclaimed all knowing deputy "criticism" that always has his negative take on, well, pretty much everything on here.

    As for being critical of guys who had no idea it had any other meaning, perhaps a little research should be made before comments are made out of ignorance. If someone made a comment out of ignorance about any other subject on here they get blasted, so what's the difference? At least I didn't resort to belittling anyone by calling names or chewing anyone out, I just set the record straight, minus the comment to deputy "what's his name", only because, well, he tends to make crude comments about a lot of things he doesn't know the first thing about.

    As for your previous quote of mine, don't take that so personally, was just explaining that it wasn't junking up your car if you put one on it. If you prefer to remember a different way brother then by all means do so. But don't talk down to someone that would want to do it their way.

    In fact, I have no problem with someone displaying their pride in being a firefighter on their car, just as long as it's done tastefully. I mean a sticker or a tag, no big deal. When your whole car is a rolling advertisement for fire dept. stuff, well, that's pushing it. I'm not even going to get started on the vehicles that look like a miniature ambulance rolling around with every light that Galls Inc. sells. But alas, that is a totally different topic for a totally different thread.

    But hey, I've known plenty of good firefighters that if someone saw their car they would "assume" that person was just a whacker, when infact that guy is a damn good firefighter, he just has a lot of pride. I figure to each his own, I might not like it or agree with it, but it's what they like, it's a free country, and if they're not breaking the law, then let htem be to themselves.
    Last edited by firefightinirish217; 04-05-2011 at 09:20 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChiefKN View Post
    It sure looked like it was for sale comercially, like a t-shirt. Or was that link to something else?
    Given that Apex admittedly ripped the idea off from the PD's "Thin Blue Line" it's not surprising that lot's of others got the same idea...

    (BTW, it's a common theory that the "Thin Blue Line" traces its origins back to the "Thin Red Line" from the Crimean War which brings the lineage full circle. Oddly enough, the movie, "The Thin Red Line" about Guadalcanal came out the year before Apex started using the "Thin Red Line" design "borrowed" from the cops...)
    Last edited by DeputyMarshal; 04-08-2011 at 10:20 PM. Reason: fixed broken link
    "Nemo Plus Voluptatis Quam Nos Habant"

    The Code is more what you'd call "guidelines" than actual rules.

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    Ahh, the typical Deputy Dipshhitt response, get called on something and then try to discredit it by calling it a rip off blah blah blah. Even if they used the existing idea to come up with the red line logo what's the difference in them doing that and the police getting theirs from the military term? Deal with it man, you were disrespecting someting that you had no idea that it meant respect and you figured you needed to come back on here and try to discredit it. Nice try though. No one ever said they didn't have inspiration for their design, just that Apex is where the THIN RED LINE originated and that LODD's is what it is meant to represent.

    Also, please provide for me a date for the blue line, can't quite seem to find one. The red line came out in 1999. Mine's from 2000 and they were out a year before I got mine.

    For your enjoyment and enlightenment:

    Post 2270

    The Thin Red Line flag originated with the Apex, NC Fire Department. The design of the flag was given to the North Carolina Fallen Firefighters Foundation to use to honor and remember our fallen brothers and sisters who paid the ultimate sacrifice. Many companies have counterfeited the design and are selling and using the logo in many different products and designs.
    Many departments are displaying the flag under the US Flag at half staff when there is a NC line of duty death.
    Keep in mind that if someone is buying the Red Line merchandise from anyone other than the NCFFF there are no proceeds from the sale of the merchandise going to support the NCFFF.
    The foundation board has addressed the customization of the thin red line items, such as the tags. While we would like the symbol of honoring our fallen to stay pristine, we understand that if someone purchases an item they can do just about anything with it. In the past the board has granted permission for a department to incorporate the thin red line into their department patch.
    That is a brief history of the origins and position of the NCFFF.
    If you have specific questions, please contact me at 919-605-0115.
    Thank you
    Edward Brinson, President
    North Carolina Fallen Firefighters Foundation

    http://firenews.net/index.php/editor/blog_article/785/

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    Thin Red line, Thin Blue line and even thin Green line (Federal officer) plates and stickers are sold all over the place. And because of this, they are all over the cars i see as well. While the original intent and meaning was in the in right place, sadly, it has become completley abused by whackers and worse yet, people who think it will somehow keep them from getting parking and speeding tickets. Their are two cars on my block with Thin Blue Line stickers and neither one is in Law Enforcement.

    How many people do you know with PBA cards who have never given a dime to the PBA? I know TONS. People simply abuse these things.

    A post on the first page sums it up quite well,

    "Those who can, do. Those who can't, brag.

    Almost without fail, people I've seen who are the the loudest about being firefighters are the ones who do the absolute damned least as a firefighter. And this applies to pretty much any other profession as well...."

    In the past when i was in the military i met many Navy SEALs. And the one thing i noticed about them was they NEVER wore any of the goofy SEAL hats, T-shirts, bracelets, watches and none of the goffy car stickers and plates. SEALs don't need to advertise because they are the real deal. One once told me, "The easiest way to spot a fake SEAL is they are the ones talking about being a SEAL".


    Everyone has different taste. And i am not going to knock people who like these front plates or the stickers. But because of how often i see them abused, i do not want to be associated with them.

    Instead of asking about adding a plate advertising your profession, take the time and effort to instead learn about the job.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChiefKN View Post
    It amazes me how many people are willing to junk up their ride....
    I think the same thing every time I see a Red Sox, Bruins or Cowboys plate.
    Train to fight the fires you fight.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LaFireEducator View Post
    I think the same thing every time I see a Red Sox, Bruins or Cowboys plate.
    Them's Fightin Words, Son.
    Courage, Being Scared to Death and Saddling Up anyways.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LaFireEducator View Post
    I think the same thing every time I see a Red Sox, Bruins or Cowboys plate.
    Oh, I agree.... I dont even let the dealer put any stickers, plates or other garbage on my car.
    I am now a past chief and the views, opinions, and comments are mine and mine alone. I do not speak for any department or in any official capacity. Although, they would be smart to listen to me.

    "The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on the list."

    "When tempted to fight fire with fire, remember that the Fire Department usually uses water."

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    Quote Originally Posted by DeputyMarshal View Post
    Agreed. Ranks right up there with "I fight what you fear" stickers...
    Blue lighters... every stinkin' one of them!
    DFW



    "There's no such thing as a free lunch."

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    I see nothing wrong with personalizing your ride. I also understand the value of leaving it original. To each his own. Everyone is free to look as cool or stupid as they wish.

    My wife bought me these when I was promoted to Batt Chief.



    As I've said before, volunteers sacrifice alot to do what they do with little reward. If my personalized plates happen to solicit an atta boy from an otherwise uncaring stranger, I'll take it knowing that I've earned it.
    My wise and profound comments and opinions are mine alone and are in no way associated with any other individual or group.

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    Default The symbol, remember it first

    Having spent many years as a board member on the North Carolina Fallen Firefighters Foundation I want to talk about some things. The symbol was to honor those who died in the Line of Duty. There is nothing wrong with placing a tag on a car or truck if it is done in honor or memory. Individuals are open to their preference but it is up to the owner in the end. Where things are wrong is all the ripoff vendors that started selling them from coast to coast without giving its history and what they represented when they sold them. The one side benefit I found through the use of the Thin Red Line on display is the tighter bond it has created with all firefighters and family members who know what it stands for. I created NCFFF.org and have maintained it for for but all of but 6 months or so since the foundation has existed and the meaning has always been posted so all know its meaning. Lets not sweat the small stuff and honor the original intend of the symbol.

    C. Simon
    Former Executive Board Member NCFFF - 8+ years
    NCFFF Webmaster

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    Quote Originally Posted by foooee View Post
    Having spent many years as a board member on the North Carolina Fallen Firefighters Foundation I want to talk about some things. The symbol was to honor those who died in the Line of Duty. There is nothing wrong with placing a tag on a car or truck if it is done in honor or memory. Individuals are open to their preference but it is up to the owner in the end. Where things are wrong is all the ripoff vendors that started selling them from coast to coast without giving its history and what they represented when they sold them. The one side benefit I found through the use of the Thin Red Line on display is the tighter bond it has created with all firefighters and family members who know what it stands for. I created NCFFF.org and have maintained it for for but all of but 6 months or so since the foundation has existed and the meaning has always been posted so all know its meaning. Lets not sweat the small stuff and honor the original intend of the symbol.

    C. Simon
    Former Executive Board Member NCFFF - 8+ years
    NCFFF Webmaster
    THank you sir, that was my original point before a certain someone came in here and tried to smear it. Also, thank you for creating NCFFF.org. It is a site which I visit regularly to check things out to see what's going on with the foundation.

    Oh yeah, Deputy Marshall, still waiting on a link for all of that "marvelous" nit witted information you spewed out about the design being a rip off from the cops. Tic-toc, tic-toc.
    Last edited by firefightinirish217; 04-08-2011 at 06:23 PM.

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    Default The Thin Red Line Origin

    I'll give you guys the history on where this version of "the thin red line" came from as it relates to the fire service. I know, because I was there when the idea was brought up.

    I was a member of a volunteer department in NC from '95-'07. It used to be a sleepy little town, one where you roll the sidewalks up at night after 9pm. Now, it's one of the fastest growing areas in the nation (Apex, NC). So, in the good ol' days like '96-'97, the cops would pull up on the front ramp when we'd be hanging out during those warm summer nights. There was a group of us, like 8-10 that were all young in service, and eager to catch first out on every call possible.

    So, one night when a cop was sitting out front, one of the guys asked the cop "hey, what does that blue line license plate mean"? The cop just said "it's the thin blue line, stands for law enforcement and the line we walk between good and evil". It became an ongoing joke, asking all the cops what it stood for. Some had no idea, which made it hilarious. So, being the smart *****e$ we are, we said "let's make thin red line plates to stand for the fire department". So, we all grabbed the front tags off of our cars/trucks, and painted them black and placed a thin red line of electrical tape in the middle. We wore them with pride....

    Shortly after this, a gentleman by the name of Paul Dunwell created the N.C. Fallen Firemen's Foundation. He was the Chief of one of our neighboring departments, and some of our guys were close to him. He asked if he could use our idea of the "thin red line" tag to show respect to our fallen Brothers and Sisters. We said "of course you can, no big deal", especially since the funds go to a worthy cause. And now, who would have known that when I make trips to the NJ Firemen's Convention in Wildwood, NJ, that I'd be seeing thin red line stuff being sold by vendors.

    So to answer your question new guy, the main purpose of the plate is to show respect to the ones' that have gone before us and made the ultimate sacrifice. Those that add stuff to it, don't know the meaning or the intent. It has nothing to do with being paid or volunteer. If anyone tells you different, have them come on here and talk to me. I know, I was there and was a part of it.

    Stay safe Brothers....

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    Quote Originally Posted by RFDGloWorm View Post
    I'll give you guys the history on where this version of "the thin red line" came from as it relates to the fire service. I know, because I was there when the idea was brought up.

    I was a member of a volunteer department in NC from '95-'07. It used to be a sleepy little town, one where you roll the sidewalks up at night after 9pm. Now, it's one of the fastest growing areas in the nation (Apex, NC). So, in the good ol' days like '96-'97, the cops would pull up on the front ramp when we'd be hanging out during those warm summer nights. There was a group of us, like 8-10 that were all young in service, and eager to catch first out on every call possible.

    So, one night when a cop was sitting out front, one of the guys asked the cop "hey, what does that blue line license plate mean"? The cop just said "it's the thin blue line, stands for law enforcement and the line we walk between good and evil". It became an ongoing joke, asking all the cops what it stood for. Some had no idea, which made it hilarious. So, being the smart *****e$ we are, we said "let's make thin red line plates to stand for the fire department". So, we all grabbed the front tags off of our cars/trucks, and painted them black and placed a thin red line of electrical tape in the middle. We wore them with pride....

    Shortly after this, a gentleman by the name of Paul Dunwell created the N.C. Fallen Firemen's Foundation. He was the Chief of one of our neighboring departments, and some of our guys were close to him. He asked if he could use our idea of the "thin red line" tag to show respect to our fallen Brothers and Sisters. We said "of course you can, no big deal", especially since the funds go to a worthy cause. And now, who would have known that when I make trips to the NJ Firemen's Convention in Wildwood, NJ, that I'd be seeing thin red line stuff being sold by vendors.

    So to answer your question new guy, the main purpose of the plate is to show respect to the ones' that have gone before us and made the ultimate sacrifice. Those that add stuff to it, don't know the meaning or the intent. It has nothing to do with being paid or volunteer. If anyone tells you different, have them come on here and talk to me. I know, I was there and was a part of it.

    Stay safe Brothers....
    Thank you sir, hopefully that clears the air about things.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChiefKN View Post
    Wow... being awfully critical of guys who didn't know it had some other meaning.

    It sure looked like it was for sale comercially, like a t-shirt. Or was that link to something else?

    http://www.emergencystuff.com/300102.html

    Gosh, no mention here.... wonder if they are even giving a piece to the charity?
    Chief, it used to mean something, then the vendors got a hold of it and saw $$$$$. All proceeds in our area go to the NCFFF, but up there I'm sure it goes right into the cash drawer.

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    Thank You Sir for this History Lesson and reminder of how we can remember those who gave all in the service.

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