Thread: Chain Question

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    Default Chain Question

    Does anyone know if there is an NFPA standard for the minimum size and grade of chain that is to be used during extrication? The chain will be utilized mostly for stabilization and load support (for example a vehicle down an embankment). No lifting or pulling. I've tried looking at NFPA 1670 and got a headache. Thanks for any responses.

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    The last time that was tossed around here - the answer was No.

    No standard (NFPA or otherwise) could be found on "Rescue Chain"

    However there was some very good discussion on the topic which you may find interesting.

    http://www.firehouse.com/forums/showthread.php?t=114953 (Grade 80 rescue Chain)
    Take Care - Stay Safe - God Bless
    Stephen
    FF/Paramedic
    Instructor

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    Unlikely to find an NFPA refrence to "rescue chain". You should consider complying with applicalble OSHA/ASME regulations regarding chain however.

    You should consider investing in nothing less than Grade 80 chain for rescue, regardless of it's intended use. Even better, invest in Grade 10 chains and attachments.

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    This is a no brainer..

    OSHA requires grade 80 as the minimum requirement for overhead lifting

    Does everyone know the definition of a overhead lift??

    and if you know the definition, does anyone disagree with the notion that there are or could be a situation when overhead lifts are performed in the rescue field?


    Assuming you know all of the above, the simple solution would be to have all your rigging the same grade... just different sizing.

    My rig has all grade 80 chain. Its tagged and certified. I also run premium block and tackle in accordance to my wire rope size.

    Its important to also know that your hooks and associated accesories also be be the same grade as the chain. A example would be if you ran a grade 80 chain using grade 70 grab hooks. the assembly would be rated as grade 70.

    I also frequently see in training sessions across the country, that the fire departments winch on their rescue truck, has a grade 40 or grade 70 hook on the wire rope..... Not a good gig.

    Just a few months back I was hanging with Mike doing a rescue jack demo when I seen the rescue trucks winch with this termination (GRADE 40 HOOK)on the wire rope. I was even more impressed when the chief called me at 9am the next morning asking me the place again to take the rope and have it replaced. He had the hook replaced and swaged socket (machine pressed) back on his wire rope.. thus giving him a 100% efficiency. A wedge socket can reduce the ropes efficiency to 85%

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    Quote Originally Posted by scooby0066 View Post
    This is a no brainer..

    OSHA requires grade 80 as the minimum requirement for overhead lifting

    Does everyone know the definition of a overhead lift??

    and if you know the definition, does anyone disagree with the notion that there are or could be a situation when overhead lifts are performed in the rescue field?


    Assuming you know all of the above, the simple solution would be to have all your rigging the same grade... just different sizing.

    My rig has all grade 80 chain. Its tagged and certified. I also run premium block and tackle in accordance to my wire rope size.

    Its important to also know that your hooks and associated accesories also be be the same grade as the chain. A example would be if you ran a grade 80 chain using grade 70 grab hooks. the assembly would be rated as grade 70.

    I also frequently see in training sessions across the country, that the fire departments winch on their rescue truck, has a grade 40 or grade 70 hook on the wire rope..... Not a good gig.

    Just a few months back I was hanging with Mike doing a rescue jack demo when I seen the rescue trucks winch with this termination (GRADE 40 HOOK)on the wire rope. I was even more impressed when the chief called me at 9am the next morning asking me the place again to take the rope and have it replaced. He had the hook replaced and swaged socket (machine pressed) back on his wire rope.. thus giving him a 100% efficiency. A wedge socket can reduce the ropes efficiency to 85%
    Which is a little weird when you think about it. Swaged= FIXED constant tension termination. Wedge=IN THEORY tightens as you pull on it. And YES, they are a 85% max termination. But in pure physics, it doesn't appear to make much sense. T.C.

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