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  1. #21
    MembersZone Subscriber voyager9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by neiowa View Post

    If hydrant man completes hydrant hookup and then hoofs it to the scene (either afer opening hydrant and water is flowing or or before opening an R/C valve is opened): .
    One advantage to the RC valve is that the line is uncharged while the hydrant man is hoofing it up to the scene. This means he could move the line to the side of the road before it weighs 32,000 lbs.
    So you call this your free country
    Tell me why it costs so much to live
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  2. #22
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    Everyones' comments here are very helpful. We are just trying to find some simple solutions to do what the military terms, create a "force multiplier". The remote controlled hydrant valve seemed like a simple way to get one more person into our initial attack crew. I know the comments about holding the rig for 60-90 seconds at the plug while it is being set up are very valid. That is critical time. We have continued to do research into this new valve and are willing to give it a try. Some of the old dudes on the department had some serious heartburn about the electronics, but they got in their trucks, started them and turned on the radios, scanners, and gps. I know the harsh fireground can be much more unpredictable, and the manual override, even if we ignore the low battery warnings, still lets it function manually. Right now, we think it will be a good tool to use. I have a new question though, who is using a hydrant assist valve either on the hydrant to boost flow or in-line in long lays??

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by BenFireFan View Post
    I have a new question though, who is using a hydrant assist valve either on the hydrant to boost flow or in-line in long lays??
    We have hydrant assist valves attached to the LDH coming off the back of all our apparatus. The only time it isn't used is when the piece is close enough to the hydrant for a pony length (aka, no hose off the back), or when mutual aid gets assigned to the hydrant and goes "WTF" and takes it off when they get there.
    So you call this your free country
    Tell me why it costs so much to live
    -3dd

  4. #24
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    Ben-

    I see that you're trying to do the best thing for your department's situation, and that is respectable. While you certainly shouldn't ignore any potential options, I would strongly recommend these simple procedures:

    1. Offensive fire (moderate water is required): Firefighter jumps out, wraps the hydrant, and jumps back on the piece. You arrive with a full crew and a supply line in the road. Begin your attack off of tank water and now anybody can charge the hydrant line. This could be another incoming company, a FD ambulance crew, a chief officer or a firefighter in a POV. Worst case scenario, the engineer can run back and make the hook-up, if necessary (not ideal, but far better than letting the fire grow for an extra 90 seconds before you put water on it).

    2. Defensive fire (high flows immediately required): Firefighter jumps out, wraps the hydrant, and stays while the engine drives off. The engineer throws a hose clamp on as soon as they arrive on scene, allowing the hydrant FF to charge the line as soon as he is able. The engineer stretches the necessary attack line(s) and charges them while the hydrant FF hoofs it up to the scene.

    For scenario 2, if you know that another company happens to be shortly behind you, you can operate as in scenario 1.

    Both guarantee your water supply while ensuring that you do not have to delay fire attack.

  5. #25
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    i like the idea and approach of the device. but on the other hand im not a fan of replacing man with machine to cut costs and avoid staffing issues. this gives the penny counters one more thing in there arsenal to "downsize" your platoons.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by shott8283 View Post
    i like the idea and approach of the device. but on the other hand im not a fan of replacing man with machine to cut costs and avoid staffing issues. this gives the penny counters one more thing in there arsenal to "downsize" your platoons.
    But that's just it - it doesn't! There is very little, if any, practical application for it on the fireground.

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