Why register? ...To Enhance Your Experience
+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 24
  1. #1
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    5

    Default Good Training Drills you know!?

    My station has become somewhat complacent with drilling. I am trying to bring up new drills and new things to do but I'm still newer so I only know so much. What are some good drills and ways to train you have done or heard of?

    stay safe


  2. #2
    Forum Member RyanK63's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Fleetville, Pennsylvania
    Posts
    240

    Default

    My department is rural so we are always training on water supply and filling tankers. Search and rescue is something simple that can be done right in your fire house. We have also done RIT training at our house.

  3. #3
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Bossier Parrish, Louisiana
    Posts
    10,527

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RobinsonG View Post
    My station has become somewhat complacent with drilling. I am trying to bring up new drills and new things to do but I'm still newer so I only know so much. What are some good drills and ways to train you have done or heard of?

    stay safe
    Depends on the water supply, type of structures, volunteer/career, etc.

    A little more in the way of specifics may help.
    Train to fight the fires you fight.

  4. #4
    MembersZone Subscriber tree68's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Jefferson County, NY USA
    Posts
    2,264

    Default

    IFSTA has a book of company drills that can be adapted to your needs. Inside drills, outside drills, all sorts of tasks.

    The description says there are 75 drills - more than enough to keep you busy, and by the time you get to #75, it'll be time to go back to #1.

    Firehouse.com, Firefighterclosecalls.com, and other sites have plenty of training ideas, too.

    Even allowing for duplication between sites (and the book), you shouldn't run out of drills for a while.

    The IFSTA book is about $64. Firehouse and FFCC are both free.

    Searching for "firefighter training" on the web sure brings up a lot of "pay to play" training sites...
    Opinions my own. Standard disclaimers apply.

    Everyone goes home. Safety begins with you.

  5. #5
    Back In Black ChiefKN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    The Nice Part of New Jersey
    Posts
    6,981

    Default

    This is going to sound stupid... but it was fun and opened some eyes.

    Have a radio/maps/streets/water source/size up drill.

    Split your guys up and assign them to the apparatus.

    Go to an ops radio channel or if you have a dedicated frequency use that.

    Each crew will rotate into the officer riding position. All responses are cold (no lights, no sirens, regular driving).

    They will be "dispatched" by the OIC of the drill to a location in your district, the firefighter in the officer seat will have to guide the operator by using the map, street index, whatever to the location, position the apparatus, give a complete sizeup (including nearest water source) over the radio. All of this should be compliant with good radio procedures.

    Switch "officers" and repeat.

    Bring them all back and critique. Be even better if you have it on tape and then you critique.

    We found that our guys had a better respect for knowing the response area, water supplies, and how they talked on the radio.

    You'd be shocked at what you see and hear. We had a guy who should have said, "Engine 53 responding" and said "Engine 53 in pursuit". I kid you not. He was serious (and clueless).
    I am now a past chief and the views, opinions, and comments are mine and mine alone. I do not speak for any department or in any official capacity. Although, they would be smart to listen to me.

    "The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on the list."

    "When tempted to fight fire with fire, remember that the Fire Department usually uses water."

  6. #6
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    3,720

    Default

    Do walk thru of different types of buildings

    Id problems, hazards, chemicals, fire protection systems, etc...........

  7. #7
    Forum Member GTRider245's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Augusta,GA
    Posts
    3,056

    Default

    The best thing I have found that keeps my volunteers motivated is to keep showing them things that make the job easier. Try some different hose loads. Show them how to correctly handle and control a line. Just keep things interesting and don't waste thier time.
    Career Firefighter
    Volunteer Captain

    -Professional in Either Role-

    Quote Originally Posted by Rescue101 View Post
    I don't mind fire rolling over my head. I just don't like it rolling UNDER my a**.

  8. #8
    Forum Member FyredUp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 1999
    Location
    Rural Wisconsin, Retired from the burbs of Milwaukee
    Posts
    9,847

    Default

    We did a fun drill at one of my POC FDs the other night. We hooked to the hydrant in the station with 1 3/4 inch hose and had to advance up and down the apparatus bays in between the fire apparatus. It surely did teach about spacing the crew out on the line, stockpiling hose at the corners, and most of all working together.
    Crazy, but that's how it goes
    Millions of people living as foes
    Maybe it's not too late
    To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

  9. #9
    MembersZone Subscriber tree68's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Jefferson County, NY USA
    Posts
    2,264

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FyredUp View Post
    We did a fun drill at one of my POC FDs the other night. We hooked to the hydrant in the station with 1 3/4 inch hose and had to advance up and down the apparatus bays in between the fire apparatus. It surely did teach about spacing the crew out on the line, stockpiling hose at the corners, and most of all working together.
    The current FF1 class here ran a similar hose drill that simply used cones. Pull the hose from a dummy "hose bed," (you could use the real deal, too - this was just faster than reloading the bed on the truck), out 50' or so to a cone, make a hard right, go another 50-75' to another cone, then a hard left and on to two more cones (another 50') where the nozzle was opened and another cone 50' out was knocked down.

    Try not to knock down the intermediate cones, or drag them from their spot.

    It was run outside on the grass, with a charged line of course, and 3 or 4 member teams. I was running our engine to charge the lines, and once or twice I almost had to shut the line down after they knocked down the cone because they were nearly too tired to shut the nozzle off.

    After the target cone is knocked over, break, drain, and load the hose and do it again, with a different team.

    The faux hose bed has two sides, so while one team was advancing hose, others were reloading the hose for the next group out.

    The teams learned the same lessons as FyredUp mentions, some better than others.
    Opinions my own. Standard disclaimers apply.

    Everyone goes home. Safety begins with you.

  10. #10
    Forum Member GTRider245's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Augusta,GA
    Posts
    3,056

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FyredUp View Post
    We did a fun drill at one of my POC FDs the other night. We hooked to the hydrant in the station with 1 3/4 inch hose and had to advance up and down the apparatus bays in between the fire apparatus. It surely did teach about spacing the crew out on the line, stockpiling hose at the corners, and most of all working together.
    I do this with my guys at least annually right before thier yearly live burn, just to make sure they remember how to advance hose and to keep it from becoming an issue in the burn building.
    Career Firefighter
    Volunteer Captain

    -Professional in Either Role-

    Quote Originally Posted by Rescue101 View Post
    I don't mind fire rolling over my head. I just don't like it rolling UNDER my a**.

  11. #11
    Forum Member FyredUp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 1999
    Location
    Rural Wisconsin, Retired from the burbs of Milwaukee
    Posts
    9,847

    Default

    The best part about running that drill was the fact that everyone found it wothwhile, I actually had people thank me for running the drill, and not one person complained about it. If half the drills I run go that smooth I will be a happy camper.
    Crazy, but that's how it goes
    Millions of people living as foes
    Maybe it's not too late
    To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

  12. #12
    Forum Member CaptOldTimer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 1999
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    7,201

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RobinsonG View Post
    My station has become somewhat complacent with drilling. I am trying to bring up new drills and new things to do but I'm still newer so I only know so much. What are some good drills and ways to train you have done or heard of?

    stay safe

    Back to the Basics.

    Big Box Training.

    Mayday - Firefighter Down.

    Hose layouts - Forward and Reverse.

    Ladder Placement.

    VES.


    Just to name a few.
    Stay Safe and Well Out There....

    Always remembering 9-11-2001 and 343+ Brothers

  13. #13
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    5

    Default

    My department is Volunteer, we are in a 100% hydranted area, commercial/residential buildings with mostly type III houses but an increasing number of type 5

  14. #14
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    virginia
    Posts
    537

    Default

    Go to a local playground at a nonbusy time. Advance hose lines through the various parts of the playground. Plenty of corners, tight spots, etc. Great for teaching members to work multiple corners when advancing lines.

  15. #15
    iverson
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Default

    practice make perfect.

  16. #16
    Forum Member backsteprescue123's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    4,318

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ChiefKN View Post
    This is going to sound stupid... but it was fun and opened some eyes.

    Have a radio/maps/streets/water source/size up drill.

    Split your guys up and assign them to the apparatus.

    Go to an ops radio channel or if you have a dedicated frequency use that.

    Each crew will rotate into the officer riding position. All responses are cold (no lights, no sirens, regular driving).

    They will be "dispatched" by the OIC of the drill to a location in your district, the firefighter in the officer seat will have to guide the operator by using the map, street index, whatever to the location, position the apparatus, give a complete sizeup (including nearest water source) over the radio. All of this should be compliant with good radio procedures.

    Switch "officers" and repeat.

    Bring them all back and critique. Be even better if you have it on tape and then you critique.

    We found that our guys had a better respect for knowing the response area, water supplies, and how they talked on the radio.

    You'd be shocked at what you see and hear. We had a guy who should have said, "Engine 53 responding" and said "Engine 53 in pursuit". I kid you not. He was serious (and clueless).
    We do drills similar to this also and its amazing at how some people who have been on for 20 years don't know 90% of the streets in our first due or even how to use a map book. Thank the lord that these people rarely show up and when they do they are most certainly in the back.

    Some other ideas (will include some that have been already mentioned)

    - Ground Ladders (you can never drill too hard on this) and there are always new tricks you can use to make throwing them easier. Throwing a 24 footer should be a one man task but I know plenty of places who consider this a company task and you will see 3 or 4 guys doing it. Unacceptable.

    - VES

    - Standpipe Ops (if thats something you deal with)

    - Different types of search- our go-to search tactic is the oriented man search and we drill on it pretty hard. Some of the guys with 20 years on can't seem to shake the boot/wall search method so we try to get them used to doing the oriented search.

    - Pulling hoselines- Another thing you can never practice enough. Something I tell our guys all the time "Amateurs practice until they get it right, professionals practice until they can't get it wrong"

    - MVA Ops - this can include actual extrication but we have found that though people may know the extrication skills they are lacking in some of the other areas needed on an accident scene. We have recently started drilling pretty hard on the size up and stabilization phases of accidents. Size up doesn't only mean evaluating what resources you will need and how many injuries there are. Size up includes talking to your EMS personnel and evaluating the damage to the car and the Pt's complaints.

    ** For example- Side impact collision. Pt is the restrained driver in a vehicle that was struck on the drivers side. Moderate damage to his door but the other car is not in the way. Pt is c/o some pretty moderate to severe neck/back pain. Sure you could open the passenger door and try to take them out that way, but unless there is a bench seat, the center console is probably going to be very detrimental to your patient. Even though you have access from the other side of the vehicle, it is in the patients best interest to take the drivers door or maybe do a sidewall removal depending on seat positioning.

    - Relay Pumping and Drafting- Always a good one. Our first due is approx. 60% hydranted and 40% non, but a good majority of our fires occur in hydranted areas so it does not hurt to practice setting up tanker shuttles and relay pumping operations. We had one guy with quite a few years on who didn't know what a relief valve was, how to operate it, or what it was for.

    - Power Tools- You might be amazed at how many people on your department know how to check a saw for fuel but have no idea how to turn it on or troubleshoot it. (If you don't have this problem I am jealous! ) Go over how to check the chain and tighten or loosen it if required. How to disassemble it for cleaning, etc. Also go over any other power tools such as the hydraulic rescue tool pump, fans, etc.

    - Ventilation- Usually the drill after the power tool drill, so people have had a little refresher on how to operate the saws then we get them up on the roof simulator cutting vent holes. (And after the cutting is done we have them put their recently learned cleaning skills to the test). We also push pretty hard on horizontal ventilation. Whenever the topic of ventilation is brought up, most people immediately think "we gotta get to the roof and cut a hole". Which is good but with minimum manpower it might be just a beneficial to take a few windows as the attack team is making its push. Then once more companies arrive on scene, you can get someone to the roof.
    ------------------------------------
    These opinions are mine and do not reflect the opinions of any organizations I am affiliated with.
    ------------------------------------

  17. #17
    MembersZone Subscriber JohnVBFD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Norfolk, Va
    Posts
    1,471

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GTRider245 View Post
    I do this with my guys at least annually right before thier yearly live burn, just to make sure they remember how to advance hose and to keep it from becoming an issue in the burn building.
    I see what you're saying, but just can't help but wonder if maybe this shouldn't be the type of drill that we do more often than once a year?

    Not sure of your fire load or run volume so don't take it as criticism.

    We pull lines, throw ladders, find a spot for forcible entry, set up supply to the master stream on the ladder all montly in house, plus the added required monthly training that the Fire Training Center sends out.
    Co 11
    Virginia Beach FD

    Amateurs practice until they get it right; professionals practice until they cannot get it wrong. Which one are you?

    'The fire went out and nobody got hurt' is a poor excuse for a fireground critique.

  18. #18
    Forum Member NFD-Firefighter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    300

    Default

    We sometimes do "dead" fires. We "tone out" for a structure fire at one of our local businesses. We head over there and set everything up as if we were responding to a real fire... stretch attack lines, flow water, throw ladders... everything you would do if there was a a real fire... just no chopping holes...

  19. #19
    Forum Member GTRider245's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Augusta,GA
    Posts
    3,056

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnVBFD View Post
    I see what you're saying, but just can't help but wonder if maybe this shouldn't be the type of drill that we do more often than once a year?

    Not sure of your fire load or run volume so don't take it as criticism.

    We pull lines, throw ladders, find a spot for forcible entry, set up supply to the master stream on the ladder all montly in house, plus the added required monthly training that the Fire Training Center sends out.
    I should have rephrased. I was referring to my volunteer department, which meets weekly for about 2-3 hours on average. We do the particular drill in question at a MINIMUM of once a year, but that is not to say that that is the only time the hose comes off the truck. They get thier hands on the vital equipment a good amount for the time we have to work with (in my opinion anyway).

    No criticism taken- I can see how that could have been taken the wrong way.
    Career Firefighter
    Volunteer Captain

    -Professional in Either Role-

    Quote Originally Posted by Rescue101 View Post
    I don't mind fire rolling over my head. I just don't like it rolling UNDER my a**.

  20. #20
    MembersZone Subscriber Dickey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2000
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    5,111

    Default

    Here are the two most beneficial trainings I have done. Both were easy to teach and set up yet taught the biggest fundamental lessons a firefighter should know.

    SCBA Basketball - Divide your department into even teams. Make sure they dress for playing basketball such as shorts or loose fitting clothes. Make sure everyone is wearing SCBA but not on air until right at the jump ball. Play basketball with everyone on air including members of your team that are not playing on the sidelines. When people run out of air, they are out of the game. The team with the last person standing on air wins. This teaches them how much air they can really go through in a short amount of time when they are working. Motivates people to get into shape. It also teaches air conservation and exactly how much air you actually have when the bell goes off. We have guys that suck the bottle dry, literally. It's cheap, fun and just be careful not have fingers between SCBA bottles that bang together!!!

    Mayday/Self Rescue Training- Find a large open area with not so many obstructions such as an auditorium, gym, or we use the ice rink when it doesn't have ice in it. Put a single firefighter with a blacked out mask, very low air in an SCBA just before the bell rings, and spin them around a few times. Disorient them enough that they don't remember the way they came in. Put them in the middle of the room and tell them they have just been separated from their crew and what is their next move.

    The goal is to have them call a MAYDAY right away per your own SOG's and then see what they do.

    The results are very interesting. Some will crawl to a wall then try to find an exit. Some will call for help on the radio and some won't even activate their PASS alarms!! What I did in that situation was call for a MAYDAY, activate my PASS and took things out of my pockets to throw. I threw one thing one way and listened to see how far it went before it hit a wall. I did this in all 4 directions until I determined where the closest wall was. I crawled to it and then searched for an exit. You would be amazed at how many guys would have died in that scenario. It really brings it home and makes you think.

    Do a department survey on what they would like to see and then incorporate the "have to do" trainings with the "like to do" trainings.
    Jason Knecht
    Assistant Chief
    Altoona Fire Dept.
    Altoona, WI

    IACOJ - Director of Cheese and Whine
    http://www.cheddarvision.tv/
    EAT CHEESE OR DIE!!

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Proposed NFPA 1001 changes for 2007
    By SWLAFireDawg in forum Volunteer Forum
    Replies: 83
    Last Post: 06-23-2007, 05:42 PM
  2. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-25-2005, 08:20 AM
  3. training drills
    By mic409 in forum Thermal Imaging Cameras
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 03-25-2005, 09:59 PM
  4. Any way you look at it, say no to Kerry
    By mohican in forum The Off Duty Forums
    Replies: 199
    Last Post: 10-04-2004, 06:52 PM
  5. More School Safety Issues
    By captstanm1 in forum Florida
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 08-16-2003, 03:54 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts