Thread: Engaging Pump

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    Default Engaging Pump

    Good evening everyone,

    This is most likely a really easy question for everyone, but for me im just learning , anyways I was wondering if you were operating a masterstream, is it possibleto engage pump while you are already hooked into a hydrant, intake open to allow water into pump, masterstream device valve open and flowing off of hydrant pressure?

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    Sitting here trying to think how you are operating a master stream without being in pump....
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

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    The problem of having water moving through the pump before trying to engage the transfer case and transmission frequently occurs when multiple engine relays are run, so this is not all that unusual. Problem occurs when the flow through the impellers causes the impeller to turn. Expect to grind slightly when the transfer case is shifted into gear. The shaft coming from the transmission will be stopped, because the transfer case is in the ROAD position and the wheels are not turning, therefore the shaft is not turning. If you continue to have difficulty in engaging the transfer case, try closing the intake valve for the time it takes you to return to the cab and place the pump in gear. The shift from neutral to direct (4th) will not cause any problems and in fact will be slightly easier on the transmission than doing it with the pump stopped.

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    Default Pump engagement

    I am thinking he is in neutral and flowing from hydrant pressure.whatever kind of stream he can get from that.
    You can then shift the pump into gear and select the pump drive gear just as normal and then get out and set the pressure. Once you do put her in pump dont hit throttle pedal and try and goose it or it may raise the pressure too high and cause bad things to happen to whatever the stream is aiming at....................

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    Put your pump in gear after you put the air brakes on - that way once you exit the cab, your pump is already in gear. It doesn't make sense to park your rig, exit the cab, hook up a master stream and then get back in the cab and put your pump in gear.

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    Chief S: I do not advocate having a pump turn while you are hooking-up. It would be OK to throw the transfer case to pump but leave the transmission in neutral. Turning a pump shaft in the absence of water tends to heat the shaft under the packing causing un-necessary wear. Should the pump have the newer style ceramic/graphite seal, this is a recipe for destruction of the ceramic ring. Heat caused by the seal friction can create extreme stress when the water finally reaches the pump. The water side of the seal chills rapidly, while the dry side is cooled by heat conduction through the seal material. Ceramics and radial stresses do not play well together.

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    Default Pump Engage

    Huh......I always had my tank to pump open and always had water when pump was engaged. Chief Squirrel had it right....set brakes, engage pump and shift into gear. Easy peesey.....
    Respectfully,
    Jay Dudley
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    IF we are going to be pumping, we put the pump in gear and as soon as we get to the pump panel we recirculate water until we start flowing from the tank to initially feed the handlines. Then as the hook up to a water supply is made we refill the tank.
    Crazy, but that's how it goes
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    Jay, in your example there will not be a problem, because there is water in the pump allowing for normal packing gland cooling or water on the pump side of the ceramic seal. However in the original example, we have no way of knowing how the hook-up is being made or if there was a wet pump. I am merely making a comment about turning shafts on a dry pump, and the possible result of this practice. Most of the fireservice runs wet pumps most of the year, but there are places where it is absolutely necessary to have pumps completely dry for some part of the year.

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    Default Pump Engage

    I see your point....but I've never had a dry pump where I worked as it was always wet from the tank to pump valve being open. If you do run your pump without water for a long period there will be heat buildup and damage. I'm sure there are those department who run with a dry pump......but if you engage your pump from the cab and get out and open your tank to pump it will decrease the damage. I'm at a loss as to why you would do it that way????
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    I'm at a loss as to why you would be flowing a master stream without having the pump engaged. I understand the idea that you get enough pressure out of the hydrant that your'e just passing thorugh the pump, but I'm in the habit of always engaging the pump and at least recirculating water.

    Like most others, I set brake, engage pump, shift into gear and then go back and pull the tank to pump and tank fill. I try to do that every time so that I get in the habit and can do it in my sleep.

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    Quote Originally Posted by KuhShise View Post
    Chief S: I do not advocate having a pump turn while you are hooking-up. It would be OK to throw the transfer case to pump but leave the transmission in neutral. Turning a pump shaft in the absence of water tends to heat the shaft under the packing causing un-necessary wear. Should the pump have the newer style ceramic/graphite seal, this is a recipe for destruction of the ceramic ring. Heat caused by the seal friction can create extreme stress when the water finally reaches the pump. The water side of the seal chills rapidly, while the dry side is cooled by heat conduction through the seal material. Ceramics and radial stresses do not play well together.
    I took it for granted that people would understand that you have to recirculate your water to keep your pump cool. I leave water on the pump and the tank fill / recirculating valve partially open so that as soon as the pump is in gear, water is recirculating.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChiefSquirrel View Post
    Put your pump in gear after you put the air brakes on - that way once you exit the cab, your pump is already in gear. It doesn't make sense to park your rig, exit the cab, hook up a master stream and then get back in the cab and put your pump in gear.
    That is the way it taught and done. Why do otherwise??

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    Quote Originally Posted by JayDudley View Post
    I see your point....but I've never had a dry pump where I worked as it was always wet from the tank to pump valve being open. If you do run your pump without water for a long period there will be heat buildup and damage. I'm sure there are those department who run with a dry pump......but if you engage your pump from the cab and get out and open your tank to pump it will decrease the damage. I'm at a loss as to why you would do it that way????
    And as a case in point,where I work they are DRY from November thru April. Water goes In BEFORE the pump spins as Kuhshise correctly states. T.C.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rescue101 View Post
    And as a case in point,where I work they are DRY from November thru April. Water goes In BEFORE the pump spins as Kuhshise correctly states. T.C.
    Leave it wet, and the issue is gone. haha

    FM1
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    Quote Originally Posted by FIREMECH1 View Post
    Leave it wet, and the issue is gone. haha

    FM1
    Ah..........NO! Leave it WET and you have a FROZEN dysfunctional pump and ****ed off FF's. Not all of our runs are cushy 3-3 mile drives.Our neighbors USED to run wet pumps 'til they couldn't get water out of their Engine one night at a structure. Now they ANTIFREEZE their pumps just like us. No more problems,T.C.

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