1. #1
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    Default Just reminiscing

    I was just sitting here this morning thinking about how much has changed in just the time I have been a firefighter. The list is quite long and here are a few:

    1) Rubber turn-out coats
    2) MSA melt away helmets (You know like Johnny and Roy wore)
    3) Fireball orange plastic gloves
    4) 3/4 boots replaced by bunker pants
    5) 1800 psi steel tank demand SCBA (well if you wore one)
    6) Booster hose to 1 1/2 inch to 1 3/4 inch hose lines, and if you are radical
    enough 2 inch hose (I guess booster lines are coming back with high
    pressure)
    7) Automatic and low pressure fixed gallonage nozzles
    8) LDH becoming commonplace
    9) No more riding the tailboard
    10) ICS and NIMS
    11) EMS
    12) Haz Mat

    Just to name a few...
    Crazy, but that's how it goes
    Millions of people living as foes
    Maybe it's not too late
    To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

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    Trying to make me feel old?

    EMS in a caddy.
    Lung buster 02 valves.
    Black AMBU bags.
    Wheat foam
    58 watt federal sirens. (interceptor)

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    Caddy ambulances? how about the sheriff's department showing up with one deputy in a station wagon with a cot and O2. Loading a patient in the back, putting O2 on them, and then drive like a bat out of hell to the hospital and hope you were alive when you got there.
    Crazy, but that's how it goes
    Millions of people living as foes
    Maybe it's not too late
    To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

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    haha Nothing wrong with the "old times". That's how you guys knew the job back then and that's what helped form the fire service into what it is today. You guys are veterans that's all. Congrats and thanks for making the fire service what it is today for the younger crowd.
    "If it was easy, someone else would of done it already." - Lt. Ray McCormack FDNY

    - Firefighter 1 / HAZMAT Ops / EMT-B

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    Quote Originally Posted by FyredUp View Post
    I was just sitting here this morning thinking about how much has changed in just the time I have been a firefighter. The list is quite long and here are a few:

    1) Rubber turn-out coats
    2) MSA melt away helmets (You know like Johnny and Roy wore)
    3) Fireball orange plastic gloves
    4) 3/4 boots replaced by bunker pants
    5) 1800 psi steel tank demand SCBA (well if you wore one)
    6) Booster hose to 1 1/2 inch to 1 3/4 inch hose lines, and if you are radical
    enough 2 inch hose (I guess booster lines are coming back with high
    pressure)
    7) Automatic and low pressure fixed gallonage nozzles
    8) LDH becoming commonplace
    9) No more riding the tailboard
    10) ICS and NIMS
    11) EMS
    12) Haz Mat

    Just to name a few...
    Isn't Boston going back to these since they were less heat stressed?
    Didn't you guys wear leather?
    I thought back in da day the 3/4" boots were interchangeable with the bunker pants during the night?
    Bet everyone feels like a wuss now huh?
    Wouldn't it be more efficient to use a 2" attack line due to the output of water?
    LDH sucks, get it
    Unit 71 - Probationary Firefighter / First Responder
    Bossier Parish Fire District #1

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    better than a horse and bucket of water

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    Man I remember riding the tailboard. Sure it was dangerous as hell, but fun too. People would wave and sometimes cheer as you sped by on the way to a fire.

    And then there was riding the tailbaord in the winter...not so much fun. IF you had a hose bed cover sometimes you ducked under that to keep the biting wind off of your face on the way to a call. On the way back from a call when you were soaked with either sweat or water from fighting the fire you would again try to duck under that cover to stop from becoming a human popsicle.

    As much as I miss that thrill ride sometimes, call me a wuss if you must, but I like the 4 door cab, especially when it is air conditioned!
    Crazy, but that's how it goes
    Millions of people living as foes
    Maybe it's not too late
    To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

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    Don't forget ...

    Plectrons
    Jet Axes
    Open Cabs
    Motorola "Bricks"
    Navy Fog Nozzles
    Train to fight the fires you fight.

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    Will there ever be a more classic pumper for rural America than those mid-1970s rigs? Two-door commercial, gas engine, 5-speed, 750 pump/750 tank, low side compartments, two booster reels... Man, I miss 'em. Nothing sounded better when you engaged the pump.
    "Be polite, be professional, but have a plan to kill everybody you meet.
    --General James Mattis, USMC


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    How about the local funeral home putting a red light on the hearse, which made it into an ambulance....

    LDH in the 70's - canvas hose with threaded couplings... (and I'm not talking about the short "soft suction," either...

    Open cabs.

    Closed cabs with the jumpseats open to the weather (the driver and officer got to keep dry).

    Hanging off the side of the truck, never mind the back step.

    Vacuum primers (on apparatus, not portable pumps)
    Opinions my own. Standard disclaimers apply.

    Everyone goes home. Safety begins with you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 6Duron1 View Post
    Isn't Boston going back to these since they were less heat stressed? If that is what they choose to do, good for them. I bought my own first pair of bunker pants and I won't step backwards to 3/4 length boots ever again.
    Didn't you guys wear leather? Not to begin with. The first POC FD I was on had MSA meltaways. Then Cairns 660's. I never had a leather helmet until I bought mine own.
    I thought back in da day the 3/4" boots were interchangeable with the bunker pants during the night? Not on any FD I was on. It was one or the other.
    Bet everyone feels like a wuss now huh? LOL! Perhaps, but I'll take today over then.
    Wouldn't it be more efficient to use a 2" attack line due to the output of water? Of course, and that is why one of my POC FDs only uses 2 inch hose for attack lines. More water than 1 3/4 inch hose and, in our case anyways, more than most FDs flow from their 2 1/2 inch lines. Still too radical for most.
    LDH sucks, get it Oh HELL NO! LDH is freaking awesome. It surely beats the hell out of laying 2-5 2 1/2 inch lines or 2 or 3 three inch lines, or 2 four inch lines. Being rubber and being able to immediately reload it is even better. No chance of me ever supporting going back.
    Like everything else about the good old days, they weren't always as good as we want to remember them.
    Crazy, but that's how it goes
    Millions of people living as foes
    Maybe it's not too late
    To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

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    Plectrons with the 'antenna wire' taped to the wall for better reception.
    An actual red knob on the pump panel with a real wire to the throttle - no computers!
    A John Bean high pressure 2 stage pump with reels (great for pressure washing the bay floors!)
    A tanker with a gasoline engine and 5 speed transmission with every gear split.
    Re-usable AMBU bags that had to be taken apart and de-conned after calls.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EastKyFF View Post
    Will there ever be a more classic pumper for rural America than those mid-1970s rigs? Two-door commercial, gas engine, 5-speed, 750 pump/750 tank, low side compartments, two booster reels... Man, I miss 'em. Nothing sounded better when you engaged the pump.
    Take a look at my avatar. Mack CFs, ALF 900 Series, or the ALF Century, Maxim, Pirsch, some Seagraves, all classic fire trucks easily identifiable as such.

    I do agree that the trucks you speak of were the workhorses of the fire service. Nothing fancy, not much if any chrome, no electronics, very utilitarian, no nonsense, get the job done trucks that worked day after day after day. MAN! I miss those too! We had a few of those and 3 of them were front mounted pumps. Ah, now I AM missing the good aold days.
    Crazy, but that's how it goes
    Millions of people living as foes
    Maybe it's not too late
    To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

  14. #14
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    Default

    MSA Oxygen Pneolater

    Chemox Mask

    All Service Mask

    All open cabs

    Hose wagons with booster pumps

    All solid tips nozzles

    Navy All Purpose Nozzles

    Elkhart Mystery Nozzles
    Stay Safe and Well Out There....

    Always remembering 9-11-2001 and 343+ Brothers

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    Talking

    Quote Originally Posted by LVFD301 View Post
    Trying to make me feel old?

    EMS in a caddy.
    Lung buster 02 valves.
    Black AMBU bags.
    Wheat foam
    58 watt federal sirens. (interceptor)
    Wow : you worked for a rich department.
    My first ambulance was a 1967 Pontiac / meteor. huge motor , small bias tires, & even smaller brakes. Direct correlation between the speedometer and the gas gauge. The higher the speed the faster the gas level dropped. Probably got around 8 MPG on premium with the big four barrel roaring. :-}

    I remember them painting oxygen equipped and radio dispatched on the sides in 71. We were cutting edge for the time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FyredUp View Post
    Take a look at my avatar. Mack CFs, ALF 900 Series, or the ALF Century, Maxim, Pirsch, some Seagraves, all classic fire trucks easily identifiable as such.
    Yeah, I started a thread a while back about how modern apparatus all look the same. But you could tell a CF from an ALF from a Ward from a Pirsch...
    "Be polite, be professional, but have a plan to kill everybody you meet.
    --General James Mattis, USMC


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    Quote Originally Posted by EastKyFF View Post
    Yeah, I started a thread a while back about how modern apparatus all look the same. But you could tell a CF from an ALF from a Ward from a Pirsch...
    Not all of them brother, you can definitely still tell a Sutphen from all of the rest. They're the beautiful ones that still have a lot of chrome on them.

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    no SCBAs... and then SCBA with low pressure hose... when ya run out of air, stick it your coat...
    Firefighting - one of the few professions left that still makes house calls.

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    The old metal Indian packs... I sure don't miss lugging a billion pounds of water...
    Firefighting - one of the few professions left that still makes house calls.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NFD-Firefighter View Post
    no SCBAs... and then SCBA with low pressure hose... when ya run out of air, stick it your coat...
    HAHA, believe it or not I do remember those. I remember not being able to keep the hose in my jacket because my gear fit so ill.

    Wow, I look back at my first volunteer department and realize that it's a miracle nobody ever got hurt there. Well into the 2000's they were still using 60' and 70's commercial apparatus as frontline apparatus. Hell, the helmet I had, as a brand new FNG 18 year old had a nice crack on the top and no sweat band on the rough plastic head band on the front.

    I look at them now and see that they are finally trying to progress some. Perhaps things do change after all.

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    Some guy walking by in a pitch black smoky room and switching your regulator to "Doff" while your hands were full.

    Corduroy collars with wooly liners.

    Big Beam 166 box lights. (don't drop them)

    Wooden handled pike poles. (snapped a few)
    IAFF

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    Quote Originally Posted by firefightinirish217 View Post

    Wow, I look back at my first volunteer department and realize that it's a miracle nobody ever got hurt there. Well into the 2000's they were still using 60' and 70's commercial apparatus as frontline apparatus. Hell, the helmet I had, as a brand new FNG 18 year old had a nice crack on the top and no sweat band on the rough plastic head band on the front.

    I look at them now and see that they are finally trying to progress some. Perhaps things do change after all.
    I still have one of those old lids hanging on my wall (it's one of the first versions of the modern helmet). It's so crappy you can fricken bend the plastic with your bare hands!
    Firefighting - one of the few professions left that still makes house calls.

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    Scott Pak I with a steel 1800 psi bottle, an elephant trunk breathing tube, and a face piece that left a lot to be desired in the comfort and visibilty area.

    Scott Pak II with an aluminum 2216 psi bottle (we thought we died and went to heaven, a lighter bottle and a little more air), chest mounted regulator and still with the elephant trunk.

    Scott Pak IIA, same as above with that pain in the *** don/doff positive pressure switch.

    Scott 2.2, another dream come true, face piece mounted regulator, more comfortable back frame...the first ones had no don/doff switch and that sucked. Later ones had the addition of the don/doff switch and that allowed you to remove the regulator without having to shut off the bottle.

    Scott AP50, better back frame, better flow to the face piece, heads up display, SEMS integration, more info, more easily readable on the chest mounted gauge module.

    There it is folks the history of my POC FDs airpacks since I have joined.
    Crazy, but that's how it goes
    Millions of people living as foes
    Maybe it's not too late
    To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

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    Default LoL

    Indian back packs those things sucks azz
    Chem ox...yeah
    I do miss riding tailboard. I remember when the 2 1/2 and hydrant wrench popped off and slapped both knees and crawling up in the hose bed til we got there.
    Jet axe ..lol I didn't even know that anyone knew what that was.
    Lets not forget the steel hoods to protect the Brother's riding tailboard.
    The best part of riding tailboard was the view...lol
    Can't forget the pr of asbestos gloves to field test
    Pompier ladders rock..
    Last edited by Pipeman4; 06-08-2011 at 09:30 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FyredUp View Post
    Caddy ambulances? how about the sheriff's department showing up with one deputy in a station wagon with a cot and O2. Loading a patient in the back, putting O2 on them, and then drive like a bat out of hell to the hospital and hope you were alive when you got there.
    Station wagon? Luxury!



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