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Thread: Gantry Crane

  1. #1
    Moderator ProgressiveRescue's Avatar
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    Default Gantry Crane

    Hello All,
    I recently did some training that involved building a gantry crane. We do it at least once a year as part on the FEMA "O" Course or the stone-age Olympics as I like to refer to it.
    I'd like to get some different takes on construction of the crane and or little things found through trial and error that worked well for you. This like anything else is a skill that the more times you do it you always find ways to improve upon it.
    The pic below shows the crane constructed from 6x6x16' lumber lashed and frapped together. The legs are dug into the ground aprox 1'. We have used webbing and pinned the legs in place before to control any possible movement. The raise is being done by a 25:1 MAS (2900 lb. Load) The lowering operation is a 2:1 MAS running through a rack. The load was lifted initially off the ground by means of a come-along.
    Any Thoughts...
    Stay Safe,
    Mike Donahue

    [IMG]
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    "Training Prepares You...For Moments That Define You


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    I have never used this technique in the field in 20+ years of USAR. Done it many times in training, but never needed to pull it out of the tool box. I just don't see much practicality to it in the field; maybe somone has a heroic story to tell where they put this together. I see it more as a team building skill and nothing more. In most USAR environments there are too many other options to move large debris that don't require the manpower and equipment to make a gantry.

    In the "old days" you used a rigging sling to lift the block. That is as the gantry sat up the static sling lifted the block. I was introduced to the cum-a-long a few years ago...All I can say is be careful...I have more confidence in a static sling (crane rigging sling) than a cum-a-long. To operate the cum-a-long you have to be in fairly close proximity to the load. If the cum-a-long or carabiner fail, that could be the end to your toes!!! During an evolution at an SCT class where I was a student that exact thing happened. The kid running the cum-a-long crapped himself! Yes the failure most likely would have occured using the sling, but the no one would have been inches from loosing a foot.

  3. #3
    Forum Member jdcalamia's Avatar
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    Default

    Mike,

    Anymore pictures, other angles, etc...
    John D. Calamia, BS, NREMTP, FP-C
    Firefighter/Flight Paramedic
    Broomall, PA

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    Moderator ProgressiveRescue's Avatar
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    Sorry John... No other shots I took that pic quickly during the operation.
    "Training Prepares You...For Moments That Define You

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    Quote Originally Posted by jmatthe2 View Post
    I have never used this technique in the field in 20+ years of USAR. Done it many times in training, but never needed to pull it out of the tool box. I just don't see much practicality to it in the field; maybe somone has a heroic story to tell where they put this together. I see it more as a team building skill and nothing more. In most USAR environments there are too many other options to move large debris that don't require the manpower and equipment to make a gantry.

    In the "old days" you used a rigging sling to lift the block. That is as the gantry sat up the static sling lifted the block. I was introduced to the cum-a-long a few years ago...All I can say is be careful...I have more confidence in a static sling (crane rigging sling) than a cum-a-long. To operate the cum-a-long you have to be in fairly close proximity to the load. If the cum-a-long or carabiner fail, that could be the end to your toes!!! During an evolution at an SCT class where I was a student that exact thing happened. The kid running the cum-a-long crapped himself! Yes the failure most likely would have occured using the sling, but the no one would have been inches from loosing a foot.
    This is one of those tools that is rarely used but does a good job at teaching the fundamentals and let's face it its fun too do. One day I hope to be in a situation where I need it just so I can say Yea...I've used that before in a rescue.
    Mike Donahue
    "Training Prepares You...For Moments That Define You

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