1. #1
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    94

    Default Department Training Requirements?

    Instead of helping derail another thread, I figured I would start a new one. What are your department's standard training requirements for your personnel?


    My Department:
    District of 250 sq. miles with population of about 4,000
    All volunteer, 25 members

    -Just started mandating FF2/Basic Ops Firefighter (equivilent to FF1 in Illinois) within 2 years of being offered the class

    -IL licensed EMT-First Responder within 2 years of being offered the class

    - Vehicle/Machinery Operations and Hazardous Materials Operations within 5 years of hire

    - Minimum 30 hours of EMS training and 30 hours Fire/Rescue training a year

    - All training is paid for by the Fire District


    Also, what are your state's FF1 requirements hours-wise? In Illinois, it's 160-180 hours minimum.

  2. #2
    Forum Member
    Bones42's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    Pt. Beach, NJ
    Posts
    10,684

    Default

    State of NJ....FF1. ~140 hours.

    No difference between paid, volunteer, anything between.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

  3. #3
    Forum Member
    RyanEMVFD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 1999
    Location
    Why? It's not like you're going to visit me! But I'm near Waco, Texas
    Posts
    2,386

    Default

    We try to follow the SFFMA (Texas volunteers) rules for training.
    NREMT-P\ Reserve Volunteer Firefighter\Reserve Police Officer
    IACOJ Attack

    Experts built the Titanic, amateurs built the Ark.

  4. #4
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Schenectady, NY
    Posts
    460

    Default

    So your saying in the 1st 2 years a new member has to spend 300-400 hrs in training and not have stepped a foot in the fire house for dept. training? And I take it being an EMT is not optional?
    Stephen J Bourassa
    Latham FD (NY)
    member since 1969
    challenge competitor since 1993

  5. #5
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Bossier Parrish, Louisiana
    Posts
    10,598

    Default

    Combo Department
    To complete your probation as a volunteer:

    1. Complete department-developed skills checklist containing district applicable elements of FFI & FFII.

    2. Complete computer based FFI program.

    3. Complete NIMS 700, 800,100 & 200.

    4. Pass department develop 100 question test containing elements of FFI, FFII and department SOPs.

    5. Complete CPR

    Any additional EMS training is optional but most members do take either First responder or EMT due to our call volume being heaviliy EMS.

    Volunteer Department:

    No specific requirements in terms of getting off probation, however Firefighters are expected to attend 70% of all drills and get one LSU certification per year.

    NIMS 700-200

    FFI is preferred by the two-year mark.

    There are no training requirements for career or volunteers in LA.
    Last edited by LaFireEducator; 07-07-2011 at 08:27 AM.
    Train to fight the fires you fight.

  6. #6
    55 Years & Still Rolling
    hwoods's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Glenn Dale Md, Heart of the P.G. County Fire Belt....
    Posts
    10,739

    Thumbs up And..............

    Here, Training is mandated by the County, it is not a State function. The Counties in the Baltimore/Washington DC area are pretty much on the same track:
    Starting with your join date, you have 30 months to acquire the following certifications.........
    1. Vol. FF Recruit School. This is a 40 hour class with very basic information for the "Right in off the Street" Rookies. Includes CPR/AED, and NIMS 100/200
    2. Haz Mat Operations
    3. FF I
    4. EMT-B. ALL EMS is Fire Based, and Private providers do not run Emergency calls. Virtually every Fire Station has an Ambulance, so folks need to be competent in EMS........
    Never use Force! Get a Bigger Hammer.
    In memory of
    Chief Earle W. Woods, 1912 - 1997
    Asst. Chief John R. Woods Sr. 1937 - 2006

    IACOJ Budget Analyst

    I Refuse to be a Spectator. If I come to the Game, I'm Playing.

    www.gdvfd18.com

  7. #7
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    88

    Default

    Career Department 5 sq miles population 12,000 (1 year to get PA FF1, PA EMT and Hazmat Ops.)

    Volunteer Department 1 2sq miles population 7,000 (18 months to get PA FF1, Hazmat Ops, CPR, First Aid and NIMS 100,200,700,800.)

    Volunteer Department 2 0.5 sq miles population 300 (NO TRAINING REQUIREMENTS)

  8. #8
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Bossier Parrish, Louisiana
    Posts
    10,598

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hwoods View Post
    Here, Training is mandated by the County, it is not a State function. The Counties in the Baltimore/Washington DC area are pretty much on the same track:
    Starting with your join date, you have 30 months to acquire the following certifications.........
    1. Vol. FF Recruit School. This is a 40 hour class with very basic information for the "Right in off the Street" Rookies. Includes CPR/AED, and NIMS 100/200
    2. Haz Mat Operations
    3. FF I
    4. EMT-B. ALL EMS is Fire Based, and Private providers do not run Emergency calls. Virtually every Fire Station has an Ambulance, so folks need to be competent in EMS........
    Just out of curiosity, what happens if somebody comes in the door with Operations, NIMS and FFI?
    Train to fight the fires you fight.

  9. #9
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Lusby, MD
    Posts
    1,035

    Default

    Within 2 yrs of joining must have:

    EMTB or First Responder
    Blood borne pathogens and CPR

    In order to ride the Fire Apparatus must also have
    FF1
    In house training package completed.

    There is also a Haz-Mat requirement, but I'm not sure if the awareness level is still required or if we moved up to the operations level.

    All courses offered by the state through MFRI.

    We are all volunteer and run just over 2000 calls per year combined fire, rescue and EMS.

  10. #10
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    81

    Default

    That state of TN sets out minimum requirements here.
    Before being able to fight a fire you must complete a 16 hour Introduction to fire and emergency services class mandated by the state(My department actually requires this before you can operate on any emergency scene).

    Within 36 months state law mandates a 64 "Basic Firefighting" as well as attending a state approved Live Burn training.

    Before operating a vehicle you must demonstrate to the chief or deputy chief your ability to do so. Except for a few with experience driving large trucks this usually includes several hours of hands on training. You must also complete a state mandated course on Vanessa K. Free and emergency vehicle operation (Not a full blown EVOC).

    Additionally members are required to go through Blood Borne Pathogen training and STRONGLY encouraged to maintain a current CPR for pro rescuers certification.

    There are at least 2 hours per month of training on various topics such as extrication, forcible entry, pump operations and water supply etc that are offered and these are a soft mandatory (as in if you miss one or two no one will complain depending on the topic, miss consistently and you may be headed for trouble).

    Other classes are offered, for instance in the next couple months the county will be offering EMR/First Responder training. This will not be required but I know that MANY of our firefighters (Myself included) are going to be taking this class.

  11. #11
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    94

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fitguy51 View Post
    So your saying in the 1st 2 years a new member has to spend 300-400 hrs in training and not have stepped a foot in the fire house for dept. training? And I take it being an EMT is not optional?
    I should clarify further. The 30 hours of continuing ed for both Fire and EMS are offered in-house during our normal meeting nights each month. While attending FF2, typically the members are excused from the monthly department training. The 30 hours for EMS continuing ed is the state standard for each year. Many of our members get their minimum training through a combination of our in-house classes and the numberous classes put on by the Illinois Fire Service Institute throughout the state.

    We mandated EMT-First Responder instead of EMT-Basic, since First Responder is only a 40 hour class, as opposed to EMT-Basic's 160 hours. 75% of our calls are EMS, and it gave us interoperability of utilizing anyone available namely for bad trauma and cardiac arrest calls. I personally had a problem with the fact that every MVC call we went on during the day, I would be the only EMS-trained person on-scene besides the IC, and always ended up doing the patient care. Granted, now the arguement has turned into I'm the highest level of care, being a paramedic, but that's a whole other topic.

  12. #12
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    West Burlington, IA
    Posts
    120

    Default

    My department just re-wrote our minimum standards:

    First year - FF1, Haz-Mat Ops, Blood-Borne Pathegon, CPR, NIMS 100 and 700 (we do this seperate from what the IFSTA book offers for FF1).

    Second year - FF2, NIMS 200, EMT-B

    Third year - Driver/Operator Pumping apparatus

    All training is done in-house by certified instructors with exception of EMT. We have a local community college that offers that. We then pay for them to take their national/state certification test(s).

    If a person comes on with FF1 or 2 already, we do a refresher on how we do our hose loads on the engines, our SCBA system and a few other topic areas that are in-house specific - local streets, addressing, paging and radio systems for example.

    If they come on with EMT or higher, we cover our local protocols with them.

    Regardless, no one comes on our department and just starts riding to calls. They all have to wait a minimum of a 4 month period in which they are evaluated on their attendance to alarms (station duty for them), training sessions and meetings.

    They then move to a "Mentored" probationary status for 4 more months in which they are allowed to ride on limited calls - no mutual aids for example but they can go on local calls. Limited duties to exclude interior and roof operations while in the Mentor program. To be considered for the Mentored status, they have to have completed Chapters 1-9 of FF1, be fit-tested, Haz-Ops, Blood Borne Pathegon, CPR and both NIMS requirements.

    After that, they can move to Active Probationary until they finish out their first year and then become regular Active members.

    No members are authorized to drive until they complete the DOP course and gain certification.

    As for aerial (we have one), they can take DOA in their fourth year if they choose to do so.
    Last edited by WBFD25; 07-07-2011 at 10:34 PM.

  13. #13
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Lusby, MD
    Posts
    1,035

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by WBFD25 View Post
    My department just re-wrote our minimum standards:


    Regardless, no one comes on our department and just starts riding to calls. They all have to wait a minimum of a 4 month period in which they are evaluated on their attendance to alarms (station duty for them), training sessions and meetings.

    They then move to a "Mentored" probationary status for 4 more months in which they are allowed to ride on limited calls - no mutual aids for example but they can go on local calls. Limited duties to exclude interior and roof operations while in the Mentor program. To be considered for the Mentored status, they have to have completed Chapters 1-9 of FF1, be fit-tested, Haz-Ops, Blood Borne Pathegon, CPR and both NIMS requirements.
    Wow, you definitely have a different approach than we do. We try to get people riding as soon as we can, at least as aids on the ambulance or observers in fire apparatus. We've found that getting them involved sooner grabs their interest and we have less chance of losing them.

    I understand needing to make sure that people understand your way of doing things and know what they are doing, but I think I'd lose interest if I came in and had to wait almost a year to start interior operations when coming from another department having done that before.

  14. #14
    MembersZone Subscriber
    voyager9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Southern NJ
    Posts
    2,007

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Eng34FF View Post
    Wow, you definitely have a different approach than we do. We try to get people riding as soon as we can, at least as aids on the ambulance or observers in fire apparatus. We've found that getting them involved sooner grabs their interest and we have less chance of losing them.

    I understand needing to make sure that people understand your way of doing things and know what they are doing, but I think I'd lose interest if I came in and had to wait almost a year to start interior operations when coming from another department having done that before.
    I agree there. I would think new members would quickly loose interest if they aren't able to ride the apparatus for so long after joining.

    We allow new members to ride the apparatus once they're sworn in and have demonstrated knowledge of said apparatus.. equipment location..etc. Without FF1 they're basically observers/gophers but they can still be useful and it gets them active and keeps their interest.
    So you call this your free country
    Tell me why it costs so much to live
    -3dd

  15. #15
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    West Burlington, IA
    Posts
    120

    Default

    We do allow them to enter after the fire has been knocked down to perform overhaul, so there is some interior work I guess.

    The rules we have in place now are similar to the first department I was on - no interior or roof work until after the first year on. It still managed to keep my interest and that of several others who have joined since I left 10 years ago to change departments.

    We all know there's more to fireground operations than just roof or interior; we felt it was important that our new members get a good grasp on the entire job rather than just part of it. We have several members put on prior to these rules being in place who were allowed to rush right in to going interior. As a result, they're decent on interior operations but haven't the foggiest about exterior operations as a result of being let loose so soon.

  16. #16
    55 Years & Still Rolling
    hwoods's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Glenn Dale Md, Heart of the P.G. County Fire Belt....
    Posts
    10,739

    Thumbs up Well............

    Quote Originally Posted by LaFireEducator View Post
    Just out of curiosity, what happens if somebody comes in the door with Operations, NIMS and FFI?

    Any new or returning Volunteer with any credentials received elsewhere may submit a formal request to the Fire Commissioners (A 9 Member Board, I'm one of them) for an "Equivilency Certification". The Commissioner who handles Training matters will look at the request and make a recommendation. The full Commission can accept or reject that finding. One point: National Pro Board is seldom questioned, but out of State training is checked to be sure it meets NFPA Standards........
    Never use Force! Get a Bigger Hammer.
    In memory of
    Chief Earle W. Woods, 1912 - 1997
    Asst. Chief John R. Woods Sr. 1937 - 2006

    IACOJ Budget Analyst

    I Refuse to be a Spectator. If I come to the Game, I'm Playing.

    www.gdvfd18.com

  17. #17
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Very Rural Kansas
    Posts
    19

    Default Training

    My Department is 20 members covering a town of 2000 and 300 sq miles of Rural area with a Interstate running through the middle.

    We require:

    1st Aid and CPR
    Bloodborne Pathagons
    Make Half the trainings Per year (We train Twice Per Month)
    Hazmat Awareness and Hazmat Operations

    1st year Firefighters must make a Fire School within their first year of joining the Department. The Departments in the area take turns hosting the school with the assistance of our State FireFighter Association. Fire School usually consists of weekend classes with a burn trailer on the final day. There are about 10 different classes offered with half days sessions to choose from.

    They do offer FF1 and EMT or 1st responder but they are not required.

  18. #18
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Bossier Parrish, Louisiana
    Posts
    10,598

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hwoods View Post
    Any new or returning Volunteer with any credentials received elsewhere may submit a formal request to the Fire Commissioners (A 9 Member Board, I'm one of them) for an "Equivilency Certification". The Commissioner who handles Training matters will look at the request and make a recommendation. The full Commission can accept or reject that finding. One point: National Pro Board is seldom questioned, but out of State training is checked to be sure it meets NFPA Standards........
    What about IFSAC?
    Train to fight the fires you fight.

  19. #19
    55 Years & Still Rolling
    hwoods's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Glenn Dale Md, Heart of the P.G. County Fire Belt....
    Posts
    10,739

    Thumbs up And......

    Quote Originally Posted by LaFireEducator View Post
    What about IFSAC?

    Missed your post...... IFSAC is acceptable as long as the course outline and hours fall in line with the NFPA guidelines........
    Never use Force! Get a Bigger Hammer.
    In memory of
    Chief Earle W. Woods, 1912 - 1997
    Asst. Chief John R. Woods Sr. 1937 - 2006

    IACOJ Budget Analyst

    I Refuse to be a Spectator. If I come to the Game, I'm Playing.

    www.gdvfd18.com

  20. #20
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Southern Indiana
    Posts
    497

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by WBFD25 View Post
    My department just re-wrote our minimum standards:

    First year - FF1, Haz-Mat Ops, Blood-Borne Pathegon, CPR, NIMS 100 and 700 (we do this seperate from what the IFSTA book offers for FF1).

    Second year - FF2, NIMS 200, EMT-B

    Third year - Driver/Operator Pumping apparatus

    All training is done in-house by certified instructors with exception of EMT. We have a local community college that offers that. We then pay for them to take their national/state certification test(s).

    If a person comes on with FF1 or 2 already, we do a refresher on how we do our hose loads on the engines, our SCBA system and a few other topic areas that are in-house specific - local streets, addressing, paging and radio systems for example.

    If they come on with EMT or higher, we cover our local protocols with them.

    Regardless, no one comes on our department and just starts riding to calls. They all have to wait a minimum of a 4 month period in which they are evaluated on their attendance to alarms (station duty for them), training sessions and meetings.

    They then move to a "Mentored" probationary status for 4 more months in which they are allowed to ride on limited calls - no mutual aids for example but they can go on local calls. Limited duties to exclude interior and roof operations while in the Mentor program. To be considered for the Mentored status, they have to have completed Chapters 1-9 of FF1, be fit-tested, Haz-Ops, Blood Borne Pathegon, CPR and both NIMS requirements.

    After that, they can move to Active Probationary until they finish out their first year and then become regular Active members.

    No members are authorized to drive until they complete the DOP course and gain certification.

    As for aerial (we have one), they can take DOA in their fourth year if they choose to do so.

    Wow - I see the 4 month waiting for new members with no prior training/expierence but does this hold for everyone? Thinking of somebody who moves into the area with FF12, Instructor, EMT-B, Officer classes etc. I can see a short 'training' program for department specific stuff but 4 months seems long a long time.
    Last edited by The nots so new FNG; 07-23-2011 at 07:18 AM.

  21. #21
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Long time no Sea
    Posts
    2,253

    Default

    Low call volume department. around 30 calls per year, including mutual aid.

    127 population.

    NFPA 1001 FF1 Nebraska 87 hrs classroom, then practical skills, then written exam.

    CPR every 2 years.

    NIMS 700, ICS 100-200 (officers higher certifications)

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Hey GOP
    By MIKEYLIKESIT in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 188
    Last Post: 10-03-2010, 03:34 AM
  2. Should Officers be charged in LODD's?
    By KEEPBACK200FEET in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 46
    Last Post: 03-29-2006, 11:21 PM
  3. Inquiry in to Driver Accidents Leads to New Training
    By SSTONER in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-29-2006, 12:50 AM
  4. Professionals or not?
    By CHUGIAKFFEMT2 in forum Volunteer Forum
    Replies: 144
    Last Post: 11-09-2005, 12:49 PM
  5. FYI in CA
    By hootman in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 09-28-2004, 12:04 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Log in

Click here to log in or register