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Thread: FDNY Exam 2000

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    Quote Originally Posted by vekdoggs75 View Post
    What's Info ordering? Sorry never got a chance to go to the Vulcan's class and awaiting my call for the prep class. Thanks
    I guess it is sort of like reading comprehension, but IMO more difficult. You'll get a few statements or instructions listed and you have to answer different Q's based off of them. For instance, put the statements in the order for which they should be completed.

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    Quote Originally Posted by HopefulFF View Post
    The Vulcan's didn't cover deductive reasoning, is that something the FDNY tutorial went over?



    On a separate note, does anyone have a copy of the LAFD practice test PSI gave out? I was trying to follow the links provided earlier but wasn't able to get a copy of it. Thanks.
    http://www.joinlafd.org/ff_sample_test.pdf

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    Quote Originally Posted by HopefulFF View Post
    The Vulcan's didn't cover deductive reasoning, is that something the FDNY tutorial went over?
    There were only a couple of questions covered in the material, but it could be on there.

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    Number 8 on the Pain Relivers comprehension quiz, is the answer of D a mistake by the city. Shouldn't it be C ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angelo_D View Post
    There were only a couple of questions covered in the material, but it could be on there.
    True, better to be safe.

    Quote Originally Posted by TomFromQueens View Post
    awesome! Thanks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by HopefulFF View Post
    I guess it is sort of like reading comprehension, but IMO more difficult. You'll get a few statements or instructions listed and you have to answer different Q's based off of them. For instance, put the statements in the order for which they should be completed.
    Got it - Thanks.

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    http://newyorkpost.com/p/news/local/...8So0CmB4RZCxJN

    Landmark bill will save city $22 billion in public employee pension costs


    ALBANY — State lawmakers passed a landmark bill this morning to cut pension benefits for future public employees — saving the city about $22 billion over 30 years.

    The state and other localities would save around $60 billion.

    "This bold and transformational pension reform plan is a historic win for New York taxpayers and municipalities," Gov. Cuomo said. "Without this critical reform, New Yorkers would have seen significant tax increases, as well as layoffs to teachers, firefighters and police."

    The "pension Tier VI" bill, praised by Mayor Bloomberg, received final passage from the Assembly 93-45 around 7 a.m.- after a struggle to round up enough votes from reluctant majority Democrats. It passed the state Senate earlier this morning.


    The bill capped an all-night session and was part of a mega-deal to expand the state’s DNA databank, move toward legalization of casinos and redraw state legislative district lines.

    Gov. Cuomo’s original pension proposal would have saved $113 billion over the next three decades.

    But he agreed to concessions demanded by lawmakers who are all up for re-election this year and rely on donations and political *organizing from unions that strongly opposed the Cuomo plan.

    Organized labor fought hardest against a Cuomo proposal to give future government workers the option of a 401(k)-style retirement plan as an alternative to a traditional pension.

    But the final deal included the 401(k) option for *future non-union high-earners with salaries of $75,000 or more.

    Cuomo also agreed to raise the future retirement age from 62 to 63, not 65 as he had proposed.

    And he agreed to keep pensions fully vesting at 10 years rather than the 12 years he had wanted.

    While his original plan required pension contributions of 4 to 6 percent of salary, the deal keeps the lowest earners at 3 percent. Those earning $45,000 will contribute 3.5 percent, with incremental increases up to six-figure earners, who will kick in 6 percent.

    The deal spared city cops and firefighters from some of Cuomo’s proposed cuts, and reduces benefits for *future city sanitation workers and correction officers.

    It requires the state, rather than the city or other localities, to fund any pension enhancers.

    It further limits overtime and lengthens from three years to five years average final salaries for pension calculations, while prohibiting any pay over the governor's $179,000 annually from being used to figure retirement benefits.

    Capitol insiders said Cuomo leveraged today’s court deadline on redistricting — lawmakers’ ultimate self-preservation tool — to get the deals; he agreed to support the redistricting plan, which he had repeatedly threatened to veto.

    Bloomberg credited Cuomo and The Post, among others, for what he called “a very good deal for the taxpayers” that should help contain city tax increases to meet skyrocketing pension costs.

    “Typically any (pension) changes have been made swapping one taxpayer expense for another,” Bloomberg told The Post. “The governor didn’t buy any reforms” in this case.

    Cuomo said pension costs to local governments have soared by 650 percent since 2002, from $1.4 billion then to $12.2 billion this year.

    The president of the state's biggest public employee union had harsh words for the dealmakers.

    "Tier 6 shoved down the throat of state legislators fixated on their own self-preservation will be devastating to 99 percent of New Yorkers,” said Civil Service Employees Association President Danny Donohue.

    Some lawmakers, including Assembly members Phil Goldfeder (D-Queens) and Amy Paulin (D-Westchester) voted for the bill reluctantly, saying the concessions won by Speaker Sheldon Silver (D-Manhattan) prevented it from being worse for "working" New Yorkers.

    Early today, lawmakers also passed:

    • A bill making the state teacher evaluation system announced last month official in law.

    • A proposed constitutional amendment authorizing up to seven non-Indian casinos at locations to be determined by the Legislature, likely in 2013. Lawmakers would have to pass the amendment again next year before it goes to voters in November 2013. Cuomo and Silver oppose casinos in Manhattan.

    • A crime-fighting DNA bill that requires samples from criminals convicted of felonies and the most serious misdemeanors. It would not apply to first-time pot-possession offenders. Cuomo and Senate Republicans agreed to Assembly Democrats’ demands to grant defense lawyers more access to DNA samples.

    • A Senate- and Assembly-drawn legislative redistricting plan and reforms to make the process more independent in future reapportionments, starting in 2022. The plan limits lawmakers’ ability to change independently-drawn future redistricting plans to 2 percent.

    Democratic black and Hispanic lawmakers threatened to sue over the redistricting plan - and minority party Democrats stormed out of the Senate chamber after charging majority Republicans with cutting off debate over the contentious redistricting bill.

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    still 10 years to vest, not 12. OT not completely eliminated from your retirement salary, but has been limited (to what extent?), avg of last 5 years salary instead of 3. Didnt read this here, but I believe the retirement minimum will be 22 years, not 25. Seem to be the biggest issues for FDNY
    Last edited by HopefulFF; 03-15-2012 at 12:55 PM.

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    I saw that too. Listen guys, don't worry about the personality section. The idea is to be honest, and to not take yourself too seriously about your health or about life in general. Don't portray yourself as someone who worries about either of these things.

    A statement like "I worry about life because at any moment, danger can be around the corner"

    You have to ask yourself this:

    Does this statement apply to me in everyday life? For me personally, absolutely not.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angelo_D View Post
    I saw that too. Listen guys, don't worry about the personality section. The idea is to be honest, and to not take yourself too seriously about your health or about life in general. Don't portray yourself as someone who worries about either of these things.

    A statement like "I worry about life because at any moment, danger can be around the corner"

    You have to ask yourself this:

    Does this statement apply to me in everyday life? For me personally, absolutely not.
    I think everyone's biggest issue isn't so much if you agree or disagree but if it should be say disagree or strongly disagree.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TomFromQueens View Post
    I think everyone's biggest issue isn't so much if you agree or disagree but if it should be say disagree or strongly disagree.
    Yeah that's very true. I guess if a statement contains words like "generally, tends, usually", you're more apt to say STRONGLY agree/disagree

    If the statement is an absolute, like "never, all the time, always, impossible, eliminates, etc.", you would lean more towards agree/disagree

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angelo_D View Post
    Yeah that's very true. I guess if a statement contains words like "generally, tends, usually", you're more apt to say STRONGLY agree/disagree

    If the statement is an absolute, like "never, all the time, always, impossible, eliminates, etc.", you would lean more towards agree/disagree
    For the most the part it's only a few questions where the Strongly Agree/Agree stuff is a question. Something like I would never steal from an employer is an easy Strongly Agree but those I'm always happy type questions make me a little nervous. I'm leaning towards disagree over strongly but I'm still nervous about it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angelo_D View Post
    Yeah that's very true. I guess if a statement contains words like "generally, tends, usually", you're more apt to say STRONGLY agree/disagree

    If the statement is an absolute, like "never, all the time, always, impossible, eliminates, etc.", you would lean more towards agree/disagree

    I thought it was the other way around...if the statement was either extreme "always", or "never" then you go with "STRONGLY". If the statement isn't as rigid, "generally" "usually" then you go agree/disagree??


    ...not talking about drugs,stealing, etc we know that answer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TomFromQueens View Post
    For the most the part it's only a few questions where the Strongly Agree/Agree stuff is a question. Something like I would never steal from an employer is an easy Strongly Agree but those I'm always happy type questions make me a little nervous. I'm leaning towards disagree over strongly but I'm still nervous about it.
    Yeah it depends on the question.

    The "I'm always happy" statment is a tough one.

    If you say STRONGLY AGREE, that means that you are always happy, 100% of the time, under all circumstances, every single day, which is obviously false. AGREE is saying that yes for the most part you are always happy, but not ALL the time.

    STRONGLY DISAGREE is kind of like saying not only am I not happy all the time, but I'm actually unhappy all of the time. It's a direct contradiction to the statement.

    DISAGREE is saying that no I'm not happy all of the time, but some of the time I am.

    This is just how I'm interpreting it. Not fact, just my opinion.

    Safe play is either AGREE or DISAGREE. I would say AGREE.

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    Quote Originally Posted by HopefulFF View Post
    I thought it was the other way around...if the statement was either extreme "always", or "never" then you go with "STRONGLY". If the statement isn't as rigid, "generally" "usually" then you go agree/disagree??


    ...not talking about drugs,stealing, etc we know that answer.
    Yeah, see the more I think about it, the more I realize that there's no definitive guide to go by when answering these. A good chunk of the statements are no brainers, some of them you have to think of it like "How would the FDNY want me to answer it?" What is the best answer that they are looking for?

    A statement like "Generally speaking I am a happy person". To that you'd say STRONGLY AGREE.

    "For the most part I am an honest person" = STRONGLY AGREE

    I am fairly organized = STRONGLY AGREE

    You have to get a feel for what they are asking and to try to figure out the psychology behind it.


    There are 2 statements that I still cannot figure out the best answer for, maybe you guys can give insight.

    1- I enjoy daily routines.
    2- I'd rather work for a structured organization than an unstructured one.
    Last edited by Angelo_D; 03-15-2012 at 03:57 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angelo_D View Post
    Yeah, see the more I think about it, the more I realize that there's no definitive guide to go by when answering these. A good chunk of the statements are no brainers, some of them you have to think of it like "How would the FDNY want me to answer it?" What is the best answer that they are looking for?

    A statement like "Generally speaking I am a happy person". To that you'd say STRONGLY AGREE.

    "For the most part I am an honest person" = STRONGLY AGREE

    I am fairly organized = STRONGLY AGREE

    You have to get a feel for what they are asking and to try to figure out the psychology behind it.


    There are 2 statements that I still cannot figure out the best answer for, maybe you guys can give insight.

    1- I enjoy daily routines.
    2- I'd rather work for a structured organization than an unstructured one.
    I would go strongly agree for both.

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    http://www.streetdirectory.com/trave...lity_test.html

    YOU NEED TO KNOW HOW YOUR ANSWERS WILL BE INTERPRETED BY EMPLOYERS!

    How would you answer the most common question?

    "I have never told a lie."

    No one could ever make this claim while being honest. Not Abe Lincoln, not George Washington. So when you come across this question, you'll have five answers to choose from:

    1. Strongly Agree
    2. Agree
    3. Neutral
    4. Disagree
    5. Strongly Disagree

    If you answer #1 or #2, you're going to set off some red flags. In fact, you'll probably set off some fireworks. Your best answer is #4: "Disagree."

    Ironically, this will tell the employer that you're actually a very honest person for answering the question truthfully.

    What you need to do is prepare, and study, and understand the psychology behind these tests.

    So why are so many employers using these tests today? The answer is simple.

    Corporate use of the pre-employment screening test has increased 300% in the last five years alone because of complex computer modeling that employs powerful mathematical algorithms, making the results far more accurate than ever before.

    Another reason employers love these tests are simply because there is nothing else out there to evaluate you with. Your previous employer will refrain from saying anything negative about you because they may risk litigation. So today, your previous employer(s) will only confirm your dates of employment.

    You may be asking yourself "Is it ethical to learn how to take these tests?" Absolutely. People will tell you "just answer the questions honestly." But you're only human. If you're taking a test for a job that can really advance your career, you can't help but be a little apprehensive when you take the test.
    So what's the next step? That's easy. Let's take a further look at some example questions, and examine exactly how your answers will be interpreted.

    Let's begin by putting our questions into segments. For demonstration purposes, let's assume the segment is "reliability." Here are some questions from this area:

    How thorough are you?

    Will you complete assignments?

    Are you the type of employee who always arrives on time?

    These are some questions the employer will have about you.

    Don't be surprised to see questions like this:

    "Work is the most important thing in my life."

    How should you answer? Put yourself in the employer's shoes. They have objectives to meet, and are looking for employees that are dedicated. They want to know that you'll be perfectly willing to go the extra mile. They don't want someone who puts their hobby, kids, housework, or pets at the same priority level.

    So absolutely select "agree" or "strongly agree" as the answer to this question.

    Here's another question:

    "I would be interested in learning how people handle stress at work."


    This is a trick question. Agree and you could be saying that you can't handle stress. Disagree, and you might think you could be admitting that you don't like to learn new things. In this case, the best choice is actually "neutral."

    This means you're it's not an important issue to you. So while you might glance at an article about stress, you don't seek out therapies, books, alcohol, etc. as a way to relieve stress.

    Almost all employee experience tension at work. Employers want to know that you won't have extreme reactions like yelling or screaming and that the tension won't affect your health and make you seek medical or psychological assistance.

    Like any other part of the job search process, you need to do your homework. You've already selected a conservative but sharp outfit to wear during your interviews. You've spent hours and hours reading about interview questions. You know what questions to expect, and how to respond.
    Your resume is honed and polished, and it highlights all of your accomplishments beautifully.

    So why risk losing the job on the personality profile test results?

    You don't have to. Do your research on personality test questions, and in no time you'll know exactly how to respond.

    For more information go to http://www.personalitytestinc.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angelo_D View Post
    Yeah, see the more I think about it, the more I realize that there's no definitive guide to go by when answering these. A good chunk of the statements are no brainers, some of them you have to think of it like "How would the FDNY want me to answer it?" What is the best answer that they are looking for?

    A statement like "Generally speaking I am a happy person". To that you'd say STRONGLY AGREE.

    "For the most part I am an honest person" = STRONGLY AGREE

    I am fairly organized = STRONGLY AGREE

    You have to get a feel for what they are asking and to try to figure out the psychology behind it.


    There are 2 statements that I still cannot figure out the best answer for, maybe you guys can give insight.

    1- I enjoy daily routines.
    2- I'd rather work for a structured organization than an unstructured one.

    1- disagree (FFs jobs are not very routine)
    2- strongly agree (FDNY is paramilitary)

    That's how I look at those Q's.



    interesting article enwhycee1. These questions are such a wild card

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    tom i thought the same thing but then i figure it says that you should consult a doctor if you have more than 3 alcoholic drinks, not that you shoudnt take the medicine

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    I feel like everyone needs to stop over thinking these personality questions. Answer them honestly and that's all you need to do. A common thing on questions like this is that they will ask the same question multiple times with different wording. If you're worried about what they want to be the correct answer, you will trip yourself up.

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    NEW YORK CITY RESIDENCY CREDIT:


    Points equivalent to five percent of the maximum possible final exam score will be added to the final exam score of those candidates who qualify for the New York City Residency Credit.

    To be eligible for the residency credit, a candidate must achieve a passing score on the examination, and must produce proof, as listed below, of the candidate’s continuous residency in New York City from July 1, 2010 through June 30,2011.

    Candidates interested in seeking the residency credit must apply by following the instructions which will be provided on the date of the computer-based test. Merely supplying a New York City address on the application form for this examination does not serve as a request for the residency credit. Requests for residency credit must be received by DCAS before the eligible list is established.

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    what do you guys think about the "I like daily routines" Q? I said I'd say disagree bc a FFs job isn't very routine but am interested in hearing other peoples opinion.

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    Quote Originally Posted by HopefulFF View Post
    what do you guys think about the "I like daily routines" Q? I said I'd say disagree bc a FFs job isn't very routine but am interested in hearing other peoples opinion.
    I would say Disagree, also because you do something every different everyday. But could also see Agree because every morning you'll do the same things i.e., equipment checks.

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