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Thread: Wheel choks

  1. #21
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    was always taught to use a chock.....will never forget because the first time I was on the engine alone, I drove off w/out picking it up and crushed one. Had to report it of course and the LT wasn't very pleased!


  2. #22
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    There is an OSHA requirement. You can easily read it at the following link. http://www.chocks.com/standards.php

  3. #23
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    Apart from immobilization, wheel chocks also force at least a partial walk-around. This is why the telephone company makes their people put out a cone behind the truck, because it forces them to walk to the rear of the truck before moving it. That gives them a good look-see behind them before backing up and also a quick glance at the truck to check for damage, leaking fluids, missing items, open compartments, blah blah blah.

    As for immobilization...

    My neighbors at the West Van Lear Fire Department wish Charles McKenzie had placed a wheel chock on November 23, 2005. Charlie was driving an older truck--about a 1982, I think--with hydraulic brakes. The parking brake failed and the truck ran over Charlie, killing him.

    While there could have been things done to prevent the movement of the truck to begin with, the take-home message for this thread is that a wheel chock most likely would have saved Charlie's life.

    Chock it for Charlie.
    "Be polite, be professional, but have a plan to kill everybody you meet.Ē
    --General James Mattis, USMC


  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by bfclt51 View Post
    There is an OSHA requirement. You can easily read it at the following link. http://www.chocks.com/standards.php
    Not that I'd put a real argument against chocks, but what does this mean?
    Osha Requirements

    OSHA Requirement 1910.178(k)(1) that states "The brakes of highway trucks shall be set and wheel chocks placed under the rear wheels to prevent the trucks from rolling while they are boarded with powered industrial trucks.

    That last part of the sentence sounds like it's from more specific citation of rule.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RFDACM02 View Post
    Not that I'd put a real argument against chocks, but what does this mean?
    Osha Requirements

    OSHA Requirement 1910.178(k)(1) that states "The brakes of highway trucks shall be set and wheel chocks placed under the rear wheels to prevent the trucks from rolling while they are boarded with powered industrial trucks.

    That last part of the sentence sounds like it's from more specific citation of rule.
    That rule is for trailers (with or without tractors) parked at loading docks for loading/unloading by forklift trucks. Many, even with spring brakes, have been known to be pushed away from the dock.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by chiefengineer11 View Post
    That rule is for trailers (with or without tractors) parked at loading docks for loading/unloading by forklift trucks. Many, even with spring brakes, have been known to be pushed away from the dock.
    That really doesn't have any bearing with fire apparatus.

    Honestly, I don't usually chock the trucks when I've got it parked on flat ground or just idling unless at an event. I do try to always chock it when pumping or on any hill.
    Last edited by johnsb; 08-20-2012 at 11:30 PM.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnsb View Post
    That really doesn't have any bearing with fire apparatus.

    Honestly, I don't usually chock the trucks when I've got it parked on flat ground or just idling unless at an event. I do try to always chock it when pumping or on any hill.
    Agreed. But Adam appeared to be asking about the applicablility of the reg. Since I have some limited knowledge of the subject, I answered with what I know. And I'm just as bad, if not worse about using chocks.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by chiefengineer11 View Post
    That rule is for trailers (with or without tractors) parked at loading docks for loading/unloading by forklift trucks. Many, even with spring brakes, have been known to be pushed away from the dock.
    Thanks, CE11, I thought that read like something more preceded it.

  9. #29
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    May I direct your attention here:
    http://yngfire.com/index.php/topic,3...bd921#msg33061
    Older automatic slack adjusters have a tendency for the grease to harden, preventing the automatic adjustment. You should be doing a periodic check of parking brake application on your daily or monthly check. With regard to aerial devices... Our policy is to chock the wheel/s that are in contact with the ground. I know some aerials raise all wheels of the ground, but as a matter of course, at least one wheel should be in contact with the ground. Operating on grades of more than 3% will result in movement of the entire aerial down slope in snow or ice conditions. Set-up in these cases needs to have the snow removed, and anti skid sand (NO SALT) placed beneathe the out-riggers prior to setting up the aerial. Chocking the low wheels adds safety to a tenuous condition. Ground operator needs to periodically check the condition of the chock and outrigger down pressure while operating. From experience having an 80,000 lb platform slowly "SKATING" down hill while you are operating is a little scairy.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by chiefengineer11 View Post
    And I'm just as bad, if not worse about using chocks.
    You dont even know where they are stored on the rigs.......
    "Loyalty Above all Else. Except Honor."

  11. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by FWDbuff View Post
    You dont even know where they are stored on the rigs.......
    I don't know where they are on your truck. I installed them on two out of three on ours.

  12. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by chiefengineer11 View Post
    I don't know where they are on your truck. I installed them on two out of three on ours.
    The wheel chock on mine is in the cab, it's called "third gear."
    "Loyalty Above all Else. Except Honor."

  13. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by JayDudley View Post
    Wheel chocks are like the SCBA's....They're there so use them. Safety...Safety...Safety. Just because you have air brakes you need to have a backup....the main concern here is to remember to remove them when your ready to leave.
    So if you should always have a back up and believe in practicing safety, safety, safety; do you chock the chocks chocking the wheel? Why not?
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    "Everyone goes home" is the mantra for the pussification of the modern, American fire service.


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  14. #34
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    Wheel chocks are manditory. They are NFPA but that is just a suggestion. I'm sure someone has an osha rule somewhere.

    The next question is how tall a chock to use. We have several older chocks that are only like 6" tall and some newer ones that are folding and about 12" tall. I think if your tires are 12-22.5 you need at least a 12" chock to meet the standard of DOT. (10% grade fully loaded truck or whatever) These chocks are over $200 each. The 6" units are easy to handle and only run about $65!

    Good luck with that!
    prepare for the worst<br />Hope for the best

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    Quote Originally Posted by spuddy98 View Post
    Wheel chocks are manditory. They are NFPA but that is just a suggestion. I'm sure someone has an osha rule somewhere.

    The next question is how tall a chock to use. We have several older chocks that are only like 6" tall and some newer ones that are folding and about 12" tall. I think if your tires are 12-22.5 you need at least a 12" chock to meet the standard of DOT. (10% grade fully loaded truck or whatever) These chocks are over $200 each. The 6" units are easy to handle and only run about $65!

    Good luck with that!
    I don't think it says ANYWHERE that you can't make your own wheel chocks. They can easily be made from treated wood or oak boards and bolted together. Anyone with basic woodworking skills could make some decent wheel chocks. The Aluminum ones just look sexier, they don't necessarily work any better.

  16. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnsb View Post
    I don't think it says ANYWHERE that you can't make your own wheel chocks. They can easily be made from treated wood or oak boards and bolted together. Anyone with basic woodworking skills could make some decent wheel chocks. The Aluminum ones just look sexier, they don't necessarily work any better.

    We made our own wheel chocks long before there was store bought aluminum ones. Yes it was a rule of the department that wheels will be chocked, which being on the street.
    Stay Safe and Well Out There....

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  17. #37
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    MHO, the rigs should always be chocked when out of the station. The agency I work for has that as a policy, sometimes I have to remind the driver/operator, but all the engineer's are in the habit.

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