Like Tree1Likes

Thread: Wheel choks

  1. #1
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    28

    Default Wheel choks

    I'm having a hard time convincing many in my department how important it is to chok wheels. Does anyone know if there is a NFPA standard or OSHA reg. that applies? Appreciate any help.
    CAPECPR likes this.

  2. #2
    Forum Member
    FWDbuff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Pee-Ayy!
    Posts
    7,401

    Default

    I have spent a lot of time in the trucking industry as well as firefighting, both career and volunteer.

    Never, in all my time on this planet, have I ever heard of, seen, witnessed or otherwise anything regarding a set of air brakes "magically failing." I can see why your guys are stubborn.

    That being said, it is always good practice to chock wheels when at an extended operation or in any situation where it might help- drafting, aerial device use, etc.

    By my own admittance, I have never been one for dropping chocks, except when I placed the aerial in service.
    "Loyalty Above all Else. Except Honor."

  3. #3
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Windsor, MA
    Posts
    237

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FWDbuff View Post
    Never, in all my time on this planet, have I ever heard of, seen, witnessed or otherwise anything regarding a set of air brakes "magically failing." I can see why your guys are stubborn.
    What if they aren't air brakes?

    Out of 10 trucks, 2 of ours have air brakes and the rest are hydraulic with a mix of hydraulic, and mechanical parking brakes. They get chocked; always.

  4. #4
    Forum Member
    FWDbuff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Pee-Ayy!
    Posts
    7,401

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KB1OEV View Post
    What if they aren't air brakes?

    Out of 10 trucks, 2 of ours have air brakes and the rest are hydraulic with a mix of hydraulic, and mechanical parking brakes. They get chocked; always.
    Good point. Have never worked around any modern apparatus that was not air brakes.

    On a side note, my antique pumper has hydro-vac juice brakes. And the parking brake is a disc-type one (around the drive shaft.) When I park her, I always put her in gear, brake on and chocked.
    "Loyalty Above all Else. Except Honor."

  5. #5
    Forum Member
    JayDudley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    1,272

    Default Wheel Chocks

    Wheel chocks are like the SCBA's....They're there so use them. Safety...Safety...Safety. Just because you have air brakes you need to have a backup....the main concern here is to remember to remove them when your ready to leave.
    Respectfully,
    Jay Dudley
    Retired Fire
    Background Investigator
    IACOJ-Member
    Lifetime Member CSFA
    IAFF Alumni Member

  6. #6
    Forum Member
    Chenzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Rural WI
    Posts
    1,231

    Default

    Correct me if I'm wrong, and I'm sure I am... If the air brakes on a truck fail, aren't they designed/supposed to fail in a "stopped" position?

  7. #7
    Back In Black
    ChiefKN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    The Nice Part of New Jersey
    Posts
    6,981

    Default

    I really can't see how using the chocks can be a bad thing and they certainly don't take long.

    But hey... what could happen?
    I am now a past chief and the views, opinions, and comments are mine and mine alone. I do not speak for any department or in any official capacity. Although, they would be smart to listen to me.

    "The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on the list."

    "When tempted to fight fire with fire, remember that the Fire Department usually uses water."

  8. #8
    Let's talk fire trucks!
    BoxAlarm187's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    3,314

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chenzo View Post
    Correct me if I'm wrong, and I'm sure I am... If the air brakes on a truck fail, aren't they designed/supposed to fail in a "stopped" position?
    Correct, the air pressure is used to keep the calipers open. Therefore, a loss of air pressure will cause the calipers to close on the rotor, bringing the vehicle to a stop (or, not letting the vehicle move if already stopped).
    Career Fire Captain
    Volunteer Chief Officer


    Never taking for granted that I'm privileged enough to have the greatest job in the world!

  9. #9
    Forum Member
    FFWALT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Nebraska
    Posts
    357

    Default

    I believe in most of the apparatus operator training courses placing wheel chocks are suggested. I don't know if there is a NFPA requirement to use them but NFPA does have them as part of the equipment required on apparatus.

    They are a good thing to put in place although I admit I fail in placing them into service. Regarding placing them on aerials, if you are using an aerial apparatus that uses 4 outriggers and it is set up properly then what good are chocks going to do? Each outrigger is transfering around 12,500 pounds to the ground so if that doesn't create enough friction to keep the apparatus from moving I don't think wheel chocks will do much.
    Train like you want to fight.
    www.kvfd.net

  10. #10
    Forum Member
    FIREMECH1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    HUSKER LAND
    Posts
    2,425

    Default

    Wheel chocks are needed, and should be mandatory through the NFPA, for when a fire apparatus is parked. With that said, if you don't do a park brake test, you don't know how your rig will hold on a hill. If one, or both springs are broken in the spring brake can, it can roll down hill.

    Air pressure is either your friend, or enemy. Lose it, and the spring brakes engage, and starts slowing you down to a stop. Have a broken spring inside the spring brake, read the above. You will not stop, or hold on a hill.

    FM1
    I'm the one Fire and Rescue calls, when they need to be Rescued.

    Quote Originally Posted by EastKyFF
    "Firemens gets antsies. Theys wants to goes to fires. Sometimeses they haves to waits."

  11. #11
    Forum Member
    FWDbuff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Pee-Ayy!
    Posts
    7,401

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FFWALT View Post
    Regarding placing them on aerials, if you are using an aerial apparatus that uses 4 outriggers and it is set up properly then what good are chocks going to do?
    I dont know, I thought the same thing, but since it was in the boss's SOP, I just did it with a smile on my face, same with the rest of his SOP's
    "Loyalty Above all Else. Except Honor."

  12. #12
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Bryn Athyn, Pa.
    Posts
    1,619

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FWDbuff View Post
    I dont know, I thought the same thing, but since it was in the boss's SOP, I just did it with a smile on my face, same with the rest of his SOP's
    I'm choking!

  13. #13
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    438

    Default NFPA requirement

    Wheel chocks have been a NFPA requirement for years. OSHA also requires them when a truck is parked on a grade.

  14. #14
    Forum Member
    CaptOldTimer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 1999
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    7,242

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tomwnh View Post
    Wheel chocks have been a NFPA requirement for years. OSHA also requires them when a truck is parked on a grade.


    Osha Requirements
    OSHA Requirement 1910.178(k)(1) that states "The brakes of highway trucks shall be set and wheel chocks placed under the rear wheels to prevent the trucks from rolling while they are boarded with powered industrial trucks.

    NFPA 1901
    Two wheel chocks, mounted in readily accessible locations, each designed to hold the fully loaded apparatus on a 10 percent grade with the transmission in neutral and the parking brake released.
    Last edited by CaptOldTimer; 07-20-2011 at 02:13 PM.
    Stay Safe and Well Out There....

    Always remembering 9-11-2001 and 343+ Brothers

  15. #15
    Forum Member
    FWDbuff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Pee-Ayy!
    Posts
    7,401

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by chiefengineer11 View Post
    I'm choking!
    There's a difference between doing it for a career department that has written SOP's when your paycheck depends on it (something you wouldnt know about) and doing it for a volunteer department that has NO written SOP's......(something you know plenty about.)
    "Loyalty Above all Else. Except Honor."

  16. #16
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Windsor, MA
    Posts
    237

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FWDbuff View Post
    Good point. Have never worked around any modern apparatus that was not air brakes.
    Right, all full size modern apparatus I have seen have air brakes. However, more than half of our in service trucks qualify as antiques. Only our newest truck (98) and the tanker we are building (92) have air brakes. The rest are a mix as mentioned before.

  17. #17
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Bryn Athyn, Pa.
    Posts
    1,619

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KB1OEV View Post
    Right, all full size modern apparatus I have seen have air brakes. However, more than half of our in service trucks qualify as antiques. Only our newest truck (98) and the tanker we are building (92) have air brakes. The rest are a mix as mentioned before.
    If they have manual slack adjusters, check them often! If they have ASAs, check them often anyway. All the spring brakes (maxies) in the world are of no value if the brake adjustment is loose.

  18. #18
    Back In Black
    ChiefKN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    The Nice Part of New Jersey
    Posts
    6,981

    Default

    Things break, stuff happens.... even stuff that is checked daily breaks.

    Wheelchocks are required on the apparatus by most standards, so why not use them?

    Really, are we debating this?
    I am now a past chief and the views, opinions, and comments are mine and mine alone. I do not speak for any department or in any official capacity. Although, they would be smart to listen to me.

    "The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on the list."

    "When tempted to fight fire with fire, remember that the Fire Department usually uses water."

  19. #19
    Forum Member
    CaptOldTimer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 1999
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    7,242

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ChiefKN View Post
    Things break, stuff happens.... even stuff that is checked daily breaks.

    Wheelchocks are required on the apparatus by most standards, so why not use them?

    Really, are we debating this?
    It beats the shiyt out of me. They are installed on all apparatus for a reason, so therefore use them or get written up either by your Officer, Battalion Officer, safety Officer or the Big Cheese himself!

    It takes what 30 seconds to pull them and put them under the wheels?

    It is called CYA!!
    Last edited by CaptOldTimer; 07-20-2011 at 08:48 PM.
    Stay Safe and Well Out There....

    Always remembering 9-11-2001 and 343+ Brothers

  20. #20
    Forum Member
    Weruj1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    NW Ohio
    Posts
    7,857

    Default

    we have the same issue ...........just trying to make it "routine" is HARD ! ..........
    IACOJ both divisions and PROUD OF IT !
    Pardon me sir.. .....but I believe we are all over here !
    ATTENTION ALL SHOPPERS: Will the dead horse please report to the forums.(thanks Motown)
    RAY WAS HERE 08/28/05
    LETHA' FOREVA' ! 010607
    I'm sorry, I haven't been paying much attention for the last 3 hours.....what were we discussing?
    "but I guarentee you I will FF your arse off" from>
    http://www.firehouse.com/forums/show...60#post1137060post 115

  21. #21
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    41

    Default

    was always taught to use a chock.....will never forget because the first time I was on the engine alone, I drove off w/out picking it up and crushed one. Had to report it of course and the LT wasn't very pleased!

  22. #22
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    3

    Default

    There is an OSHA requirement. You can easily read it at the following link. http://www.chocks.com/standards.php

  23. #23
    Forum Member
    EastKyFF's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Posts
    3,088

    Default

    Apart from immobilization, wheel chocks also force at least a partial walk-around. This is why the telephone company makes their people put out a cone behind the truck, because it forces them to walk to the rear of the truck before moving it. That gives them a good look-see behind them before backing up and also a quick glance at the truck to check for damage, leaking fluids, missing items, open compartments, blah blah blah.

    As for immobilization...

    My neighbors at the West Van Lear Fire Department wish Charles McKenzie had placed a wheel chock on November 23, 2005. Charlie was driving an older truck--about a 1982, I think--with hydraulic brakes. The parking brake failed and the truck ran over Charlie, killing him.

    While there could have been things done to prevent the movement of the truck to begin with, the take-home message for this thread is that a wheel chock most likely would have saved Charlie's life.

    Chock it for Charlie.
    "Be polite, be professional, but have a plan to kill everybody you meet.
    --General James Mattis, USMC


  24. #24
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Northeast Coast
    Posts
    3,862

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bfclt51 View Post
    There is an OSHA requirement. You can easily read it at the following link. http://www.chocks.com/standards.php
    Not that I'd put a real argument against chocks, but what does this mean?
    Osha Requirements

    OSHA Requirement 1910.178(k)(1) that states "The brakes of highway trucks shall be set and wheel chocks placed under the rear wheels to prevent the trucks from rolling while they are boarded with powered industrial trucks.

    That last part of the sentence sounds like it's from more specific citation of rule.

  25. #25
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Bryn Athyn, Pa.
    Posts
    1,619

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RFDACM02 View Post
    Not that I'd put a real argument against chocks, but what does this mean?
    Osha Requirements

    OSHA Requirement 1910.178(k)(1) that states "The brakes of highway trucks shall be set and wheel chocks placed under the rear wheels to prevent the trucks from rolling while they are boarded with powered industrial trucks.

    That last part of the sentence sounds like it's from more specific citation of rule.
    That rule is for trailers (with or without tractors) parked at loading docks for loading/unloading by forklift trucks. Many, even with spring brakes, have been known to be pushed away from the dock.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Wheel Chocks and Air Parking Brakes Question
    By gobigorstayhome in forum Emergency Vehicle Operations
    Replies: 96
    Last Post: 10-11-2009, 12:28 PM
  2. Steering Wheel
    By DepChief03 in forum University of Extrication
    Replies: 33
    Last Post: 12-06-2004, 04:31 AM
  3. Replies: 63
    Last Post: 06-01-2002, 01:28 PM
  4. Ziamatic Wheel Chocks
    By Homer623 in forum Firehouse.Com Site Comments
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 06-28-2001, 09:59 PM
  5. Front Wheel Drive Extrication
    By rsqguru in forum University of Extrication
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 12-22-2000, 11:51 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Log in

Click here to log in or register