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    Default nice extrication drill from the netherlands

    Hello guys,


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AHwBrPQ7pL0


    Captain de Graauw

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    Did they put those struts in the way of where the hinges are on the driver side door?
    NREMT-P\ Reserve Volunteer Firefighter\Reserve Police Officer
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    I don't get it.
    I am now a past chief and the views, opinions, and comments are mine and mine alone. I do not speak for any department or in any official capacity. Although, they would be smart to listen to me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RyanEMVFD View Post
    Did they put those struts in the way of where the hinges are on the driver side door?
    no ordinary in the plate work of the car.

    we use stabfast

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    The point of this was.........?
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    These opinions are mine and do not reflect the opinions of any organizations I am affiliated with.
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    I'm NOT comfortable with the stabilization of that car with the current strut placement. The two upper winch lines are where the stability is. Granted the vehicle is weight down but you have over 50% of the lever ABOVE the strut. I think the simulation is supposed to represent a vertical rescue like a car that has driven thru a wall in a upper story parking area. If anyone else has a different thought,let's hear it. T.C.

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    In an actual incident a vehicle would not remain stationary in a vertical position such as this without leaning against another object (tree, wall, building, vehicle, etc.) for partial stabilization. The Stabfast struts that they are utilizing secure into slots they have cut in the sheet metal on the vehicle body panels. Agree with TC on not being comfortable the strut type, size and placement.
    Last edited by rmoore; 08-13-2011 at 10:01 AM.

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    Aren't these the same rescuers who used a whole bunch of hoselines to float a car up into the air? If so, then I'd hate to have to spend a 24-hr shift with these guys on a rainy day. They'd be a little stir crazy and it could get dangerous.

    If you look closely at their stabilization efforts, the winch line that actually pulls the car up remains in place although it has slack in it. Also, the tag line attached to the front of the car that holds it in place from the undercarriage side remains in place. What was added appears to be the individual struts in a tripod arrangement; sides and undercarriage positions.

    I think the real question could be that even if this happened for real and the car was balancing against a pole, a building, or anything, how do you stabilize it enough that you could do full-blown extrication tasks without it collapsing?

    In my opinion, struts of any kind, used alone, would not be sufficient. In my mind, it would be those long lines from a tow truck, winch line, or even a come-along that would stabilize it. Have you ever seen how they secure one of those big radio antennae towers around your area? That thing has cable lines securing it in all directions!
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    Quote Originally Posted by rmoore View Post
    Aren't these the same rescuers who used a whole bunch of hoselines to float a car up into the air? If so, then I'd hate to have to spend a 24-hr shift with these guys on a rainy day. They'd be a little stir crazy and it could get dangerous.

    If you look closely at their stabilization efforts, the winch line that actually pulls the car up remains in place although it has slack in it. Also, the tag line attached to the front of the car that holds it in place from the undercarriage side remains in place. What was added appears to be the individual struts in a tripod arrangement; sides and undercarriage positions.

    I think the real question could be that even if this happened for real and the car was balancing against a pole, a building, or anything, how do you stabilize it enough that you could do full-blown extrication tasks without it collapsing?

    In my opinion, struts of any kind, used alone, would not be sufficient. In my mind, it would be those long lines from a tow truck, winch line, or even a come-along that would stabilize it. Have you ever seen how they secure one of those big radio antennae towers around your area? That thing has cable lines securing it in all directions!
    We've been down this road before. If this was MY deal (on a pole for example)I'd use a Hydraulic Tow truck,double lined to hold the high point and cross chain the wheellift stinger(so it can't pivot)and use a ratchet strap- around the bottom with each end of the ratchet strap, Using the double line makes a redundant safety. If you used the Z system you could make struts long enough to do a DECENT job of stabilization but I've played in the junkyard long enough to NOT be comfortable with the struts in this picture(alone). T.C.

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    Time to think outside the box.

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    Time to think outside the box!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by rmoore View Post
    I think the real question could be that even if this happened for real and the car was balancing against a pole, a building, or anything, how do you stabilize it enough that you could do full-blown extrication tasks without it collapsing?
    If the vehicle is against a utility/telephone pole then would one option be to marry the car and pole together? Those poles are pretty stable from what I've seen. Use a strap around the pole and vehicle where the two are already in contact. Also use a strut and strap at the base to secure the nose of the vehicle to, but away from, the base of the pole.

    Obviously it wouldn't work for a light pole.. and I'm not sure if it'd work for a building since it'd be harder to secure the top.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rescue101 View Post
    We've been down this road before. If this was MY deal (on a pole for example)I'd use a Hydraulic Tow truck,double lined to hold the high point and cross chain the wheellift stinger(so it can't pivot)and use a ratchet strap- around the bottom with each end of the ratchet strap, Using the double line makes a redundant safety. If you used the Z system you could make struts long enough to do a DECENT job of stabilization but I've played in the junkyard long enough to NOT be comfortable with the struts in this picture(alone). T.C.
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    If the vehicle was resting against a pole or such, would it be beneficial to perform a controlled lower of the vehicle onto the ground to aid a better extrication?

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    Quote Originally Posted by voyager9 View Post
    TC, Gotta diagram?
    Don't yet. Busy summer winding down,I'll try to mock it up soon and shoot a few pics.Junk is worth $ right now so I'm shipping more than I'm saving. T.C.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jonnycutter View Post
    If the vehicle was resting against a pole or such, would it be beneficial to perform a controlled lower of the vehicle onto the ground to aid a better extrication?
    I would,but that puts me in DISfavor with most here. Several methods can be used that will produce favorable results,each require a varying amount of equipment to accomplish. T.C.

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    If the vehicle was resting against a pole or such, would it be beneficial to perform a controlled lower of the vehicle onto the ground to aid a better extrication?
    When ever possible you do not want any additional movement of the vehicle during the rescue attempt. I wouldn't do it

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