1. #1
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    Default vehicle stability, door removal, and dash roll videos

    I've been lurking around this forum for a while...decided I should finally do some contributing!
    A few times a year I get my hands on vehicles that are bound for the scrapyard. Before I haul them in, I usually come up with an extrication/jaws/stability drill for the guys. I just got done with 2 drills using a Ford Ranger, and I took some videos.
    We usually do these drills at a slow pace, allowing the less experienced members on the department the opportunity to make decisions on how to attack the problem and operate the tools. It's valuable training for everybody. I have put together similar drills at least a dozen times over the last 5 or 6 years.
    The videos aren't intended to be a "how to", but more of a "this is what we did." There's some good footage of me crushing the truck with my Deuce...
    Comments and suggestions are welcome!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wv5AZaRJ9cw
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XfevUvm96Cg

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    Default Back to Basics !

    I would definately have your personnel and safety officers review and work on the basics of hazard recognition and control. In both videos the crews did not adequately stabilze the vehicles prior to initiating patient access, disentanglement and extrication procedures. You indicated that a safety officer was present however the crews where permitted to continue working without completing the basics first. In the first video you indicate that the vehicle was stabilzed prior to initiating the drill and then additional ropes where added by the crews during the drill for stabilzation. The video shows multiple rescuers on the downside of an unstable vehicle evidenced by the excessive rocking motion of the vehicle during the door removal. In the second video the only stabilzation shown to be in place is a single wooden wedge placed behind the passenger side front wheel.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ejfeicht View Post
    . The video shows multiple rescuers on the downside of an unstable vehicle evidenced by the excessive rocking motion of the vehicle during the door removal. In the second video the only stabilzation shown to be in place is a single wooden wedge placed behind the passenger side front wheel.
    I appreciate the input!

    Please understand that neither video is able to adequately show the entire setup...perhaps next time I will take the time to video a walkaround so that more of the vehicle can be seen.

    In the second video, wheel chocks were added to prevent forward and backward movement, on both front and rear tires (this is in addition to the parking brake which was also functioning). 2 sets of blocks and wood wedges were driven into place to prevent suspension movement, both sets on the driver's side of the vehicle. It has been my experience that this is sufficient on flat level ground; no movement of the vehicle is possible during the door removals and dash roll. Are you suggesting that something more is needed for this situation?

    In the first video, the vehicle came to rest in a manner that made it impossible to roll further down the hill. Although blocks were added to prevent the rocking motion and ropes tied to prevent downhill movement, the video does show excessive motion during the door removal; although this was discussed during the debrief, we probably should have stopped and reset the blocks and evaluated whether additional stabilization was necessary (buttresses, additional blocks/bags, etc).

    Again; thanks for the input; we are a small department and I'm always open to suggestions, tips, and advice. My biggest concern is for the safety of our guys and I hope to be able to contribute more videos here for open discussion...

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    The primary concept of stabilization it to limit the movement of the vehicle in all planes of motion. On wheel resting vehicles utilize the "Chock It, Block It and Blow It" concept with stabilization of both sides of the vehicle. Chock all the wheels, block it below the pillars with step chocks or cribbing and then deflate the tires. Remember stabilzation is a dynamic process which must be continually monitored as you change the dynamics of the vehicle during the extrication process.

    On the vehicle over the hillside rope would not be my first choice even for temporary stabilzation. A properly rigged winch cable and chains would provide a more stable means of supporting the vehicle from above. If you don't have those available then drill with your local towing company and have them respond along with you on those situations. Along with that cribbing and struts should be added as additional support on the lower side of the vehicle.

    In the second video I also noticed you elected to roll the dash forward on the driver's side of the pickup. In that evolution you then end up with the ram partially blocking the extrication pathway. In that situation jacking the dash would provide you with more room and avoid blocking the doorway making patient extrication much quicker and easier.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ejfeicht View Post
    In the second video I also noticed you elected to roll the dash forward on the driver's side of the pickup. In that evolution you then end up with the ram partially blocking the extrication pathway. In that situation jacking the dash would provide you with more room and avoid blocking the doorway making patient extrication much quicker and easier.
    We frequently drill that dash roll, followed by a roof removal for extrication. After the dash is rolled forward, we disconnect the hoses to prevent accidental release of ram pressure. I have personally used that procedure in 2 MVA's and it seemed to work well (although I don't have any other method to compare it to).

    I'm not familiar with the jacking procedure...what equipment/process is used for this?

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    Jacking or lifting the dash can be accomplished without removing the roof.

    1. Make sure there is adequate and secure cribbing in place directly under the rocker panel at the A pillar.
    2. Make 2 cuts at least 6" apart on the upper A pillar (windshield post). Fold this portion of the post out of the way or remove entirely.
    3. Make a relief cut on the upper run rail just behind the strut tower
    4. Fully cut the A pillar below the dash and above the lower hinge. (The wiring harness port in the A pillar is many times the ideal location for this cut).
    5. Insert your spreaders into the pocket that has been made in the A pillar. The spreaders are positioned at a 90 degree angle to the sidewall of the vehicle.
    6. As you open the spreaders the dash will fulcrum upwards.

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    Do you guys carry struts or stabilization jacks?
    Career Firefighter
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    -Professional in Either Role-

    Quote Originally Posted by Rescue101 View Post
    I don't mind fire rolling over my head. I just don't like it rolling UNDER my a**.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GTRider245 View Post
    Do you guys carry struts or stabilization jacks?
    No jacks; we do have a pair of makeshift struts for use as buttresses; they are 2x4's with steel eyelets about 2/3 toward the bottom, and we use a ratchet strap through the eyelet to tighten them up. They are useful, but being a fixed length limits their practicality in some situations. They also don't work well on particularly soft ground.

    Edit: This has me thinking a little...although we couldn't afford to buy new struts, I could build some adjustable steel ones that would work significantly better than our fixed length ones...I think I'll bring it up and see if it is something the board is interested in...
    Last edited by sewerzuk; 07-27-2011 at 01:33 PM.

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