Why register? ...To Enhance Your Experience
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Nebraska
    Posts
    41

    Default What tools are folks using?

    The guys are looking at specing a rescue truck. One of the questions was on rescue tools, and I really don't care what the truck has. I just want to make sure we make an educated decision and not going off emotion.

    What systems are folks using? And is anyone had problems with the electric tools powered by the battery pack? Are they sufficient to cut todays cars? Thanks for any help.


  2. #2
    Forum Member Miller337's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    875

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mccookfire36 View Post
    The guys are looking at specing a rescue truck. One of the questions was on rescue tools, and I really don't care what the truck has. I just want to make sure we make an educated decision and not going off emotion.

    What systems are folks using? And is anyone had problems with the electric tools powered by the battery pack? Are they sufficient to cut todays cars? Thanks for any help.
    1. You better start caring. Not caring is the best way yet invented to get people killed. Showing up with nothing you need is just a great way to say you care. NOT.

    2. Your dept. hasn't been in the rescue/extrication business ?. There are no known needs?. What is the majority of your calls involving rescue/extrication?.

    3. The new battery powered tools are really cool seem to work great. They might be slightly slower than regular tools. My biggest concern is battery life and durability issues. I've only got to play some with them a little and I can see alot of advantages but would want a backup unit.

  3. #3
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Nebraska
    Posts
    41

    Default

    Well I should clarify my statement " I don't care". I do care immensely about the quality of what we get, it was more a statement I'm not partial to any particular brand name. The whole reason I posted in here is to try and gain some feedback on what works best adn what doesn't work. I'm not on the committee spec'ing the truck, so all I can do is offer them what others are using and not using.

    Sorry for coming across as not caring.

  4. #4
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    41

    Default

    I got what you were talking about when you said you didn't care. I you actually didn't care then you wouldn't have posted a question.

    Anyway, let me start by saying that we run with Hurst and I personally like Genesis. I'm wanting to replace our hurst set soon. But that shouldn't influence your decision. What you need to do is develop an evaluation process. First form a evaluation committee include at least one officer and others should be experienced rescue personel. The committee should identify needs and wants. Second identify all the brands with reasonably close dealers, if you buy from someone too far away it could be a service issue. Use the needs list to eliminate any brands from consideration. At this point if budget is a major consideration contact the dealers for quotes. The hard part here is comparing apple to apples, in other words it wouldn't be fair to say that x is cheaper than y if the tools weren't comparably sized. Next, it's time to start getting demos of the tools you are most interested in. Word of warning every dealer you send a request for a quote to will want to come do a demo, which is fine but you may not have the time. I would say pick the 2 or 3 that seem to fit your needs best. Before have any dealers out have a scoring system made up that each firefighter that uses the tools fills out shortly after the demo. You make up the categories with what ever is important to you. Also have the dealers provide references to other departments using the same or as closet to the same system as what you are looking at. Some questions to ask those departments are, how is the service, reliability, performance, would you buy these again.

    The major brands are Hurst, Halmatro, Amkus, TNT, and Genesis. There are others like champion, phoenix and resqtec, I'm sure I forgot somebody, sorry if I did. As far as the electrics go I'm really interested but unwilling to be an early adopter since we don't have multiple sets. Hurst's new ones look great on paper and videos.

    Whatever you do if you develop a process first and get everyone to agree to it and use it you'll do just fine. I know one small department where they just called a few dealers cut some cars. I asked later why they choose what they did, they said they all like a different brand, but the chief decided he like this one better. How often does the rescue tool wind up in the chiefs hands?

    That was all a long winded way of saying, do your homework, involve a committee and develop a process.

    Good luck

  5. #5
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Outside Philadelphia
    Posts
    519

    Default

    In 15 years, I've used Hurst, Powerhawk, Holmatro, and TNT for incidents. I've trained with a few other brands as well, but not too extensive. I currently prefer Holmatro, and am fortunate that 3 out of the 4 places I work/vol. use Holmatro. The other uses Hurst. For my vol. house, we knew we made the right decision not long after we purchased them. A mutual aid call with a company that had brand new tools from another manufacturer. Long story short, their tool wouldn't cut the steel, ours moved in and did. I was sold from that point on.

    This is just my opinion though, and I'm sure there are many others out there. Get the different manufacturer's out and use the tools. What functions are preferred? 5000 vs. 10000 psi? Phosphate vs. mineral oil? There's a lot more to just cutting/spreading strength in HRT's.
    A Fire Chief has ONLY 1 JOB and that's to take care of his fireman. EVERYTHING else falls under this.

  6. #6
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    87

    Default

    I would highly reccomend Paratech for rescue support systems (stabalization), airbags, and forcible entry. Their struts, and hydrolics, are top notch. we spent all weekend using them on cars, school buses, farm equipment, trailors, everything you can think of. All their "Gold struts" are interchangible with base plates, all extentsions fit on all struts, you can have a strut set up for stabilazation and then need to lift at that point, if it is stabilized else where you just lower the strut, slide the hydrolic on the end of the strut, raise it back up, and start pumping...easy as could be. The struts self adjust (at 50PSI) to stabilize and progress capture as you lift the vehicle. The struts (gold struts) are good to 20,000 pounds a peice with no extensions. With a team of 6 guys and enough struts you could have a school bus 4 ft off the ground all the way around totally stable in under 25 minutes. It is the simplest and easiest equipment I have ever used and works well with small vehicles as well

    We used the paratech airbags, it is the easiest system ever...very simple, fast, light, and works well.

    As far as tools for cutting and pushing dashes and etc we use Hurst and have never had a problem. However many of the battery operated cutters have gotten much better and in my opinion are much easier to use in many (not all) situations.


    Seriously check paratech out though, the stuff is easy to use, all interchangabile, you can run all the airbags and struts off a cylinder and you can place the hyrolic for lifting under and strut you want.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Hand tools Which are Good & Bad?
    By Engine58 in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 02-10-2004, 04:00 PM
  2. Rescue Tools
    By CAP182 in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-22-2004, 07:26 PM
  3. Centaur Extrication tools
    By tmeyer in forum University of Extrication
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 01-05-2004, 01:36 AM
  4. high or low pressure extrication tools
    By chief12 in forum University of Extrication
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 08-15-2003, 10:55 AM
  5. high or low pressure extrication tools
    By chief12 in forum University of Extrication
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-14-2003, 10:31 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts