Thread: Pumper/Rescue

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    Default Pumper/Rescue

    This was originally posted in another forum, but I was suggested to move it here...

    My combi department is looking to replace our rescue truck, and we're exploring various options of what kind of setup we want. Right now we operate a standard rescue thats first out, followed by an engine and a personnel carrier. We're looking primarily at the pros/cons of doing a pumper/rescue (minimum to stay as a class A) or a heavy rescue alone, each a commercial cab. Each to be followed by a personnel carrier. If we go with a pumper/rescue, we could get rid of 1 engine.

    Right now we house 4 engines (including 2 "county" engines), 1 truck, 1 rescue, and 1 personnel carrier. Each first out engine also carries basic cribbing, portable power unit, and combi tool.

    We have a major 4-lane US route traveling through our city (Corridor H) that when finished will be a major connecting route to DC area, and anticipate a large influx of traffic. We also have a large influx of oil/gas and mining trucks that is placing a heavier demand on heavy rescue.

    Just want to see what others experiences are with a pumper/rescue setup or how other rescues are ran.

    Thanks in advance

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    We run a 1998 Salusbury rescue/pumper 800 gal / 1500gpm. Top mount pump inside of the cab, this was done to shorten the length of the rig. It has worked well for us.
    If you would like more info send me an email ff36silvereagle@yahoo.com
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    Rescue Pumpers have been gaining favor the same as Pumper Tankers. The main reason is because you can fulfill dual roles with one truck instead of two. Also important when it comes to budgets.

    There are a lot of builders out there that do a good job of this especially if the department clearly communicates to them what they want to do. The important part is that you clearly think out what equipment you want to carry and how you want the truck set up. For example, rescue on the right and engine on the left. Keep in mind that a dual role apparatus will have only half the truck for each role and you will also wind up with a longer, taller and heavier truck trying to get enough room for the equipment needed in both roles.

    I understand why people chose to go with dual role apparatus but I'm not a fan of them if you have other options. It basically goes back to the saying that you can't serve two masters.

    Walt
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    Default Go with a remount

    Consider having that Saulsbury rear body customized into a heavy rescue body and have it remounted on a new chassis. In my opinion, it doesn't sound like you will get the heavy rescue functionality out of a combi unit. There is just not enough space on a combi unit for all the equipment you might need on a heavy rescue. Loose the hose bed and have coffin storage for rescue reels and hydraulic pumps.

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    Ive seen pumper/rescues. They work well for specialties that require equipment, but not overly involved or for initial response to technical incidents. You won't have a "true" heavy rescue though. Which depending on the hazards in your district and the equipment you want to carry you might end up having to leave things off. You also lose some engine capabilities, the hose bed will get pushed higher and if you do go with top side storage you lose potential hose beds.

    So depending on how much "rescue" you need it to do it can be a great option or a big mistake.

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    we also have coffin compartments,
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    Quote Originally Posted by BennyT373 View Post
    We're looking primarily at the pros/cons of doing a pumper/rescue (minimum to stay as a class A) or a heavy rescue alone, each a commercial cab. Each to be followed by a personnel carrier.
    I'm wondering why it's preferable to make this a two piece Co. either way? Why not spend the money for a safer, custom cab that will allow for the co. to respond in one apparatus.

    We combined our small rescue squad vehicle with a pumper replacement and purchased a rescue/pumper. We don't carry a heavy compliment of tools, but ended up with the drivers side being totally "rescue" and the officer's side being the the "fire side". We carry a full class A engine compliment, and then struts, a cutter, spreader, ram, two portable power packs, type "C" cribbing kit, extra wood cribbing, 7 air bags, winches, hand tools, power tools, a chainsaw, a k12, speedy dri, water/ice rescue gear, basic haz-mat stuff, a confined space/rope rescue compliment, meter, monitors, EMS kit, etc. The engine is just over 32 ft. long and carries 750 gal, water with a 1250 rearmount pump with an officer's side pump panel. The Spartan cab has 4 SCBA seats plus the driver.

    I'd say it really depends on you expectations are of the company and their tool compliment.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RFDACM02 View Post
    I'm wondering why it's preferable to make this a two piece Co. either way? Why not spend the money for a safer, custom cab that will allow for the co. to respond in one apparatus.

    We combined our small rescue squad vehicle with a pumper replacement and purchased a rescue/pumper. We don't carry a heavy compliment of tools, but ended up with the drivers side being totally "rescue" and the officer's side being the the "fire side". We carry a full class A engine compliment, and then struts, a cutter, spreader, ram, two portable power packs, type "C" cribbing kit, extra wood cribbing, 7 air bags, winches, hand tools, power tools, a chainsaw, a k12, speedy dri, water/ice rescue gear, basic haz-mat stuff, a confined space/rope rescue compliment, meter, monitors, EMS kit, etc. The engine is just over 32 ft. long and carries 750 gal, water with a 1250 rearmount pump with an officer's side pump panel. The Spartan cab has 4 SCBA seats plus the driver.

    I'd say it really depends on you expectations are of the company and their tool compliment.
    Gahhh, brain fart. I meant a custom cab! The only reason we would have a chase vehicle is our combi dept is 1 duty man per shift, plus Chief 8-4 M-F. So generally our man power arrives in swings.... Chaser is generally all traffic control personnel, unless additional resources are requested.


    Thanks for all the feedback guys

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