Why register? ...To Enhance Your Experience
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Sartek RSV-1

  1. #1
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Wheaton IL
    Posts
    1,765

    Default Sartek RSV-1

    Anyone using the RSV-1?

    Pro, con, any specific problems or complaints?


  2. #2
    Forum Member BladesRobinson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 1999
    Location
    Indian River County, Florida
    Posts
    181

    Default

    A Boise Firefighter was nearly killed because his dive under ice began with the RSV in the wrong position. Check out the SAR-Diver Yahoo! forum for details and consider looking on YouTube for "POST: PSTD the Musical"

    www.youtube.com/watch?v=wAxh8xsIdMw

    Many team are sucessfully using the KISS system and keeping the redundant air system COMPLETELY SEPERATE from the primary system. A pony bottle with a first and second stage. The second stage regulator is on a rubber strap around the diver's neck. If necessary the diver doffs his full face masks and inserts the second stage into his mouth.

    There have been multiple near miss situations because of diverter valves being in the wrong position or leaking. If the "safety system" is the cause of out of air emergencies or near miss incidents similar to the one in Boise, it is time to re-think the safety sytem. Indianapolis Fire Department keeps the systems seperate and I believe that is a pretty good idea.
    Last edited by BladesRobinson; 11-02-2011 at 11:43 PM.

  3. #3
    Forum Member BladesRobinson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 1999
    Location
    Indian River County, Florida
    Posts
    181

    Default Boise incident

    HERE IS THE INFORMATION THAT WAS POSTED ON THE Yahoo SAR-Diver Discussion Forum...


    Re: Close call involving a PSD


    Some of our long time Yahoo! Group SAR Diver Forum members may recall an
    incident that took place in January 2008 when a public safety diver nearly
    drowned during training operations. The diver was wearing a redundant air system
    and utilizing a gas switching manifold that allowed him to switch from the
    primary air cylinder to the pony bottle without doffing his mask.

    On the air switch block a plastic clip was in place to prevent the valve from
    accidentally being switched to the reserve position and an orange stem on the
    valve would serve as a visual clue that the valve was in the reserve position.

    Unfortunately, during this training dive, the equipment was pre-assembled with
    the plastic safety clip covering the orange stem and no one noticed that the
    valve was in the "reserve" position instead of the standard "dive" position. The
    diver began his dive breathing gas from the reserve pony bottle.

    The diver was utilizing a digital pressure gauge and began his dive under ice.
    Cold air had lowered the cylinder pressure in the primary cylinder to 2700 psi
    range. The diver began his dive and minutes later the tender called to the diver
    over the communication system for an air check. The diver looked at his digital
    gauge and though it appeared that the gauge was still reading 2700 psi, he
    incorrectly replied that he had 2100 psi. The diver was certain that he would
    have used 600 psi based on the time he had been underwater and further cooling
    of the cylinder.

    Minutes later, the diver found it difficult to draw air into the full face mask.
    Gross motor functions took over and instinctively the diver pulled the plastic
    clip off of the reserve gas valve and pushed the plunger up as he had done many
    times during training. Not realizing that the plunger had already been in the
    reserve position he was surprised when he could not draw another breath of air.

    In an effort to identify the problem, the diver went through a mental check list
    in his head. During the micro seconds that had elapsed since the problem first
    became apparent, he did not have enough air in his lungs to call out for help
    over the communication system. Additionally he had begun his assent and return
    to the ice hole, so slack in his search line prevented him from giving line
    signals to request help from the surface. Essentially he was on his own to
    resolve the problem.

    The diver knew that moments earlier he had reported 2100 psi in his primary
    cylinder. He had difficulty drawing air through the regulator on the full face
    mask and after activating his redundant air supply, he still had difficulty
    drawing air into the mask. He deduced that the problem had to be with the
    regulator supplying his full face mask. His last safety system was an alternate
    second stage secured to a strap around his neck. Unfortunately this "back up" to
    the "back up" was plumbed to the pony bottle. The diver doffed his full face
    mask, placed the regulator's second stage mouthpiece into his mouth and
    confirmed that he had drawn his last breath moments earlier.

    Still yards away from his point of exit, and under ice, the diver realized that
    he would not make it to safety on his own. Out of fear of aspirating water, the
    diver made a conscious effort to keep his chin cupped in the palm of his hand
    and his nose pinched as he began to lose consciousness. As an experienced EMT he
    knew if he aspirated water he would likely die.

    On the surface, the line tender called to the diver over the communication
    system to take out slack. When there was no response the safety diver
    immediately sprang into action instinctively knowing that something was terribly
    wrong. An emergency was declared and the team quickly shifted from "training
    mode" to "rescue mode." Moments later the lifeless body of Earle Swope was
    returned to the surface. Resuscitation efforts began immediately on the ice
    shelf.

    Captain Earle Swope was the dive team leader, a capable SCUBA instructor, a
    Marine who had graduated from the USMC Combat Dive School, a husband, a father,
    and a friend of many. He had no pulse, no respirations. Today Earle is a
    survivor; thanks to the excellent training he had given his teammates and their
    prompt and efficient actions.

    Since Earle's near death experience he has been dealing with Post Traumatic
    Stress Disorder. For three and a half years he has used a variety of methods to
    overcome the disorder and has found various art forms help put his mind at ease.
    He has recently uploaded a video to YouTube that helps describe the incident and
    the journey he has been on since his near death experience. The video is nearly
    15 minutes in length and it is worth viewing to the very end. It describes the
    incident to some degree but more accurate details the challenges that accompany
    PTSD. A second video is much shorter and gives credit to those who have assisted
    Earle, including the team members who saved his live. Check out the links at:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wAxh8xsIdMw
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KiuVbpIYLs&NR=1

    Earle will be presenting three "live" performances next week. Yesterday he wrote
    me stating, "My primary motivation in creating this piece is to allow the people
    around someone going through PTSD to get a glimpse of the crazy $#!t in their
    head. The YouTube video doesn't do the installation justice as videos are
    linear whereas in the installation, I can have 10 tv's showing different images
    and 3 films projected on different walls, with the sound track and a performance
    all at the same time to demonstrate how overwhelming and incongruous life and
    thought become.

    DETAILS ON THE PERFORMANCE:
    Where: Pavilion/covered patio immediately east of the Idaho Historical Museum,
    610 N Julia Davis Dr., Boise, ID 83702

    When: 1st Thursday, September 1, 2011

    Performances: 730, 800 & 830 pm.

    Earle also shared with me that about two months ago when he was creating this
    installation and headed to the composer's home for a recording session, he had
    an epiphany regarding his near death experience.

    He wrote, "I never paniced! I fought it the whole time and ended up suffocating
    myself and going unconscious before panic set in, I maintained control the whole
    time. The bitch of the fact though is that while I controlled the physical
    aspect I kind of lost out on the psycholgical component for the next couple of
    years."

    Earle also wrote that he was going to double check the details regarding this
    incident. The narrative I provide about this incident are from my recollections
    speaking with teammates, supervisors and Earle back in 2008.

    If there are pertinent details to add, I will pass them along.

    Regards and safe diving to all!

    Blades

    P.S. I hope to see you all at the International Public Safety Diver Conference
    in September! Details at:
    http://iadrs.org/index.php?pr=CONFERENCE


    --- In SAR-Diver@yahoogroups.com, "wbladesr" wrote:
    >
    > Firefighter Nearly Drowns During Dive Exercise
    >
    > Fire officials say a firefighter is awake and talking after he nearly
    > drowned in the Parkcenter Pond Wednesday afternoon. He was
    > participating in a monthly training exercise.
    >
    > At 1:41, Ada County Dispatch got a 911 call, saying the diver was not
    > breathing.
    >
    > It turns out he had not surfaced and had to be pulled from the water.
    >
    > The other firefighters resuscitated him. An ambulance drove him to
    > Saint Alphonsus. CBS 2 Eyewitness News has called the hospital, but
    > hasn't been able to learn what condition he's in.
    >
    > Boise fire officials are debriefing the dive to find out what
    > happened. Assistant Fire Marshall Mark Senteno said although this was
    > a drill, the danger is real.
    >
    > "You're in scuba gear, you're fully self-contained, you're fully
    > reliant on your air," Senteno said. "If something happens, you're in
    > big trouble. But even more than that, the water around here is very
    > murky. As soon as you go into a hole in ice diving, within feet, you
    > cannot find your way out. You have to be tethered on to a line. If
    > you lose that tether, then you're trapped. You can't get out
    > yourself."
    >
    > THE MODERATOR ADDS...
    > THE DIVER WAS DISCHARGED FROM THE HOSPITAL AND IS OKAY. AN
    > INVESTIGATION IS UNDERWAY AND AS SOON AS FACTS ARE DETERMINED, THE
    > INFORMATION WILL BE SHARED WITH MEMBERS OF THIS FORUM.
    >



    Quote Originally Posted by BladesRobinson View Post
    A Boise Firefighter was nearly killed because his dive under ice began with the RSV in the wrong position. Check out the SAR-Diver Yahoo! forum for details and consider looking on YouTube for "POST: PSTD the Musical"

    www.youtube.com/watch?v=wAxh8xsIdMw

    Many team are sucessfully using the KISS system and keeping the redundant air system COMPLETELY SEPERATE from the primary system. A pony bottle with a first and second stage. The second stage regulator is on a rubber strap around the diver's neck. If necessary the diver doffs his full face masks and inserts the second stage into his mouth.

    There have been multiple near miss situations because of diverter valves being in the wrong position or leaking. If the "safety system" is the cause of out of air emergencies or near miss incidents similar to the one in Boise, it is time to re-think the safety sytem. Indianapolis Fire Department keeps the systems seperate and I believe that is a pretty good idea.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts