1. #26
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    If you can get your paramedic before you get out

    Some cities will hire you and send you to an academy

    The academy is the easy part/ cheap part for the department

    Check the tcfp weekly and you will see what cities want

    With the paramedic you test against alot less people!!!!!

  2. #27
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    Forgot to be a federal firefighter most want prior military firefighter experience / training

  3. #28
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    Need to make a correction on what I said earlier. You apparently no longer have to live within 100 miles of city hall to apply for HFD. That was the policy several years back and has since gone away.
    "Training doesn't make you a good fireman, fighting fire makes you a good fireman"
    http://thedarksideof911.blogspot.com/
    FTM-PTB-EGH
    IACOJ

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    Default DOD IFSAC certifications

    Mike,

    Since you are active duty right now you can enroll in and achieve firefighting certifications via DOD career development courses for free! These will be IFSAC certificates as well. If you need more info, please contact me.

  5. #30
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    First of all - THANK YOU for serving our country. We appreciate what you are doing for us. Here is an article I wrote concerning military men and women entering the fire service. I think you will find it to be very helpful. Stay safe!

    Military Experience
    Candidates who have served our country in the Armed Forces have a huge advantage over those who have not. It is generally believed that while a military veteran may not have as many certificates and fire science units as the other candidates (you were busy serving our country), you offer so much more.
    There is no substitute for life experience. The growth a young man or women experiences in the military is second to none. This growth is of course magnified depending on the assignments held. Many men and women who joined the military at a young age grew up very rapidly when put into combat situations.
    Being assigned to the front line is not required to get “credit” for serving in the military. Fire departments realize that there are many support roles that require dedication and commitment. While there is only one person on the nozzle that puts out the fire, there are numerous other assignments that need to take place on the fire ground. It is important that a firefighter be willing to work in a support role for the good of the team.
    The fire service is a Para-military organization. Many of the common terms in the fire service, such as Captain and Battalion Chief were taken directly from the military. Words like code, honor, commitment, and integrity are as important to the fire service as they are to the military.
    Men and women with military background are usually very mature, regardless of their age. They understand the need to get along with others, especially with people who come from different backgrounds from them. They understand commitment and the need to work until the job is completed. They are used to working for long periods of time in less than ideal conditions.
    Physical fitness is a big part of the military. As a result the military men and women are usually in very good shape. This is extremely important to the fire service because the number one reason entry-level candidates fail out of the academy is due to poor physical fitness. In addition, physically fit firefighters will miss less time due to injury than their a firefighter who is not fit.
    Military people demonstrate respect for authority and they understand the chain of command. The fire service operates on the same hierarchy principle as the military. The group clearly understands code and honor. Firefighters are held to a higher standard than the average person in the community. These qualities are extremely important in the fire service.
    Military men and women are used to working in a structured environment. They understand the importance of doing something right the first time. Similar to the fire department people’s lives are impacted if things are not kept in a constant state of operational readiness. Firefighters must check out their equipment each and every day. They must know the intricacies of each tool kept on the engine or truck. Training and continuing education are imperative to the fire service. It is imperative that firefighters are able to work unsupervised and that completion of a job or task is a reflection of them.
    Getting along in the fire station is critically important to being successful in the fire service. Courtesy to your fellow firefighters is critical. Cleaning up after one’s self if is expected. This is one of the first things military men and women learn in Basic Training.
    If you are still in the military and are interested in a career in the fire service, it is important that you start making provisions NOW. Start taking online classes NOW.
    If possible, put yourself in a position to get fire service-related training such as Medic or Corpsman. Hazardous Materials and firefighter training will also be beneficial. Lastly, work on general education courses so you can earn your Associates degree.
    Do not be intimidated by all of the candidates who have every certification under the sun. They were able to obtain these as full time students while you were busy fulfilling your obligation to the American people.
    A candidate who is an EMT, possesses related experience as a reserve or volunteer firefighter and is active taking fire science courses is usually at the top of his or her game. Get your qualifications, learn how to take a fire department interview and earn your badge.
    Paul Lepore
    Division Chief
    Aspiringfirefighters.com
    AspiringFireOfficers.com

  6. #31
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    [QUOTE=paulLepore;1312714]First of all - THANK YOU for serving our country. We appreciate what you are doing for us. Here is an article I wrote concerning military men and women entering the fire service(quote)

    Thank you Paul I read that article a while ago I think It was on firelink. It inspired me to chase this dream.

  7. #32
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    [QUOTE=FEDVVFAC;1312710]Mike,

    Since you are active duty right now you can enroll in and achieve firefighting certifications via DOD career development courses for free! These will be IFSAC certificates as well. If you need more info, please contact me.[/QUOTE

    That would be perfect!

    How do I enroll?

  8. #33
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    Default DOD certifications

    Mike,
    Your best bet is to go to Fed Fire Hawaii (I believe it is run by the Navy for all of the bases except maybe on the big island), and talk to their training chief. He/she can guide you in the right direction and help you. Basically you will be enrolling in distance learning courses from the Air Force (AFIADL) that are tied to AF AFSC's (same as MOS in the Army). You can start by enrolling in Hazmat Awareness, then Ops, then firefighter I, .... one at a time. Most courses are online or via CD and there is both a written (computer-based) test and a practical evaluation for each course. Again, Fed Fire can help proctor the performance-based portions. Your base training unit can administer the written (if you have problems with this, contact the NCOIC of Hickam's CE squadron for assistance with CerTest). If/when you pass each particular course, you will be issued a DOD firefighting certification with an IFSAC seal. I am leaving work this afternoon at 1500 San Antonio time (I know...this is where you want to be) and won't be back until next Tuesday if you need further help. Going back reading the posts I see you will be PCS'ing soon to TX. Which base? It might be wise to hold off enrolling until you are finished PCS'ing and both Ft. Hood and Ft. Sam have very active and aggressive departments that will be more than happy to help you out. Take care for now, FEDVVFAC

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by FEDVVFAC View Post
    Mike,
    Your best bet is to go to Fed Fire Hawaii (I believe it is run by the Navy for all of the bases except maybe on the big island), and talk to their training chief. He/she can guide you in the right direction and help you. Basically you will be enrolling in distance learning courses from the Air Force (AFIADL) that are tied to AF AFSC's (same as MOS in the Army). You can start by enrolling in Hazmat Awareness, then Ops, then firefighter I, .... one at a time. Most courses are online or via CD and there is both a written (computer-based) test and a practical evaluation for each course. Again, Fed Fire can help proctor the performance-based portions. Your base training unit can administer the written (if you have problems with this, contact the NCOIC of Hickam's CE squadron for assistance with CerTest). If/when you pass each particular course, you will be issued a DOD firefighting certification with an IFSAC seal. I am leaving work this afternoon at 1500 San Antonio time (I know...this is where you want to be) and won't be back until next Tuesday if you need further help. Going back reading the posts I see you will be PCS'ing soon to TX. Which base? It might be wise to hold off enrolling until you are finished PCS'ing and both Ft. Hood and Ft. Sam have very active and aggressive departments that will be more than happy to help you out. Take care for now, FEDVVFAC
    Thanks for the good information. I am PCSing to Ft. hood, do you Know how long it would take to to get the DOD firefighting certification w/IFSAC SEAL? I really want to finish my AAS before I start working on getting certified I understand this is the opposite way to do things but I am so close to getting my AAS should take me about 12 months. then I will have another 12 months before I get out.

    I wish I would have known this before I started the fire science degree.

    Will anything from the Fire science degree transfer?

  10. #35
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    Would becoming a volunteer firefighter once I get to Texas help me?

  11. #36
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    Go for paramedic first

    Volunteer will give you an idea of the job, and possible references from the dept

    Suggest you look st city departments before fed

  12. #37
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    Default hfd

    mr yuk, hfd is slowly has become my target department to get employed with. i'm in nc now but hoping they open up another civil service exam shortly. i didn't get the opportunity to take the test that was in october. you seem like you know what your talking about so i'm wondering which department you are from and if you would know anyone in houston to talk to ?

    regards

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikecarroll84 View Post
    Would becoming a volunteer firefighter once I get to Texas help me?
    Experience wise, absolutely. There are some great volunteer departments that operate similar to the city with the same type of protection district. For hiring purposes, most big cities such as HFD won't care the least about you being a volunteer. Most volunteers who apply for the city don't even mention it. Houston does things their way and could care less if you were a volunteer or worked 10 years at FDNY.
    "Training doesn't make you a good fireman, fighting fire makes you a good fireman"
    http://thedarksideof911.blogspot.com/
    FTM-PTB-EGH
    IACOJ

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by tothebridge View Post
    mr yuk, hfd is slowly has become my target department to get employed with. i'm in nc now but hoping they open up another civil service exam shortly. i didn't get the opportunity to take the test that was in october. you seem like you know what your talking about so i'm wondering which department you are from and if you would know anyone in houston to talk to ?

    regards
    The CSE held in October was for TCFP certified only so you didn't miss anything. With the city economy being pretty low the past couple of years, the amount of academy classes has dropped dramatically. But from what i've heard, they will hold a few full time classes this year. The best thing to do is keep checking the website. I'll see if I can find out any rumors about when the next test is.
    "Training doesn't make you a good fireman, fighting fire makes you a good fireman"
    http://thedarksideof911.blogspot.com/
    FTM-PTB-EGH
    IACOJ

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    It seems that the majority of you have said that I should try to get my paramedic certificate. I am not sure I will have time to complete the paramedic program but I will get my EMT-B as soon as I finish my AAS degree, I also plan on volunteering at the local department just so I can get some hands on experience before I try to jump on a full time paid position. The only thing I have to worry about is taken the written test. I am not worried about the physical test at all.

    Thanks for all your help.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mikecarroll84 View Post
    The only thing I have to worry about is taken the written test. .
    what study guide(s) do you all recommend?

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    Quote Originally Posted by mikecarroll84 View Post
    what study guide(s) do you all recommend?
    I have used Barron's Firefighter Exam book. It has helped me tremendously. Any areas such as math, reading comprehension that one may struggle with is covered in this book. The key is to practice, practice, practice. Good luck, dude!

  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigBruno View Post
    I have used Barron's Firefighter Exam book. It has helped me tremendously. Any areas such as math, reading comprehension that one may struggle with is covered in this book. The key is to practice, practice, practice. Good luck, dude!
    Thanks I've seen that one and Norman Hall's on here before for similar threads

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