1. #1
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    Default Taking the probie under my wing

    Hey guys and girls,
    I wanted to get some opinions from everyone. We just had a guy get out of Fire 1 and myself and two others have taken him under our wing and have been showing him the ropes. I wanted to know if anyone had any short training ideas we could do with just a couple people, like pulling lines, throwing ladders, brush truck training, radio training, that kind of stuff, I am not an engine driver by the way so I am trying to keep away from stuff involving taking the engine somewhere.

  2. #2
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    I also want to know what kind of things you, the probies want to do. Feel free to chime in.

  3. #3
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    -Practice ropes and knots wearing turnout gloves

    -Pick out a point on the map in your first due. Tell them to respond on a call at such and such location. Have them find the location on a map and the best route to get there.. (Helps them learn their first due)

    -Have them tell you how to operate the hand tools and equipment on the truck. Also ask about alternate uses..

    -Have them tell you what is in each compartment without opening the door. Ask them about other trucks in your station as well.. not just the one he always rides..

    -Have them set up medical equipment. Stage exercises where they are the primary EMT asking the questions. Have them wear the gloves and set up the AED or cut tape or pull the backs off of the pads on the AED or the 4 or 12 lead pads

    -Have them tell you all about the saws. point out each part and how to start a finicky saw. ("I can't start this" is not an acceptable response.)

    -If you can spare an SCBA, have them do chores while breathing air to show them how far a bottle can go. They cannot be hyperventilating when the stress level goes up. Make sure they know the feeling of when that mask sucks to their face.

    -it is never too early to impress MAYDAY techniques on them. (When and how.. every day)

    Sorry to write a book. Good luck!

    -Damien

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    Quote Originally Posted by DFurtman View Post
    -Practice ropes and knots wearing turnout gloves

    -Pick out a point on the map in your first due. Tell them to respond on a call at such and such location. Have them find the location on a map and the best route to get there.. (Helps them learn their first due)

    -Have them tell you how to operate the hand tools and equipment on the truck. Also ask about alternate uses..

    -Have them tell you what is in each compartment without opening the door. Ask them about other trucks in your station as well.. not just the one he always rides..

    -Have them set up medical equipment. Stage exercises where they are the primary EMT asking the questions. Have them wear the gloves and set up the AED or cut tape or pull the backs off of the pads on the AED or the 4 or 12 lead pads

    -Have them tell you all about the saws. point out each part and how to start a finicky saw. ("I can't start this" is not an acceptable response.)

    -If you can spare an SCBA, have them do chores while breathing air to show them how far a bottle can go. They cannot be hyperventilating when the stress level goes up. Make sure they know the feeling of when that mask sucks to their face.

    -it is never too early to impress MAYDAY techniques on them. (When and how.. every day)

    Sorry to write a book. Good luck!

    -Damien
    I'll forward the cleaning with SCBA to our training guy. I like that idea, plus it doesnt' hurt when they go do the crew head

  5. #5
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    What they have said.

    I would offer this: Be sure the Company Officer approves of what you are doing, get their blessing. Does this member have probationary training guide? Stick to the material that he has learned at first, re-emphasizing everything they learned in FF-1. Also does the member have to sit for a 6 or 12 proby exam by the training division? If so, you need to be sure they learn and know what is expected on those exams.


    Yes show him the pumper, brush truck, aerial ladder, etc. Make sure they know what each tool is and what their operation in the fire service is.


    Have them learn a compartment per shift. Have them show you how to throw a ladder, how to remove and advance a hose line. They are many things you can do.


    This also good for all members to help and assist with as it will re-visit the basics and sharpen their skills as well!



    Remember, their brain is like a sponge, it can only hold so much during a period of time.
    Stay Safe and Well Out There....

    Always remembering 9-11-2001 and 343+ Brothers

  6. #6
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    As a newbie, I will always say that I enjoy the hands on stuff as much as possible, however there is something to be said about just knowing where everything is. I spent 4 hours one weekend with my chief going thru each compartment of the 2 trucks. We also played "Go Get Me ______." I can't tell you how many people at my station are told to go grab something and they stand there looking more confused than Larry the Cable Guy at a Physics Conference. As the FNG, I know a lot of what I will be doing is observing and being a go-fer. With that, teach them how to tie knots around tools.

    Try and teach them how to be ahead of the game. Somethings need to be automatic. One of my instructors said "listen to what the call is and be ready before you jump out of the truck." If you know you're going to a housefire have your turnout gear on, get your scba ready, and at our station if you don't have a tool in your hand our deputy will beat the stupid out of you haha. Sad that some of these things need to be spelled out.

    Another good drill, at least it was for me, was driving around and learnign the different boxes we were on, where water supply is (either hydrant or creeks for drafting, etc), what kind of construction there is in the different areas, etc. Know Your Local. My borough is only 1 square mile, but we have residential, commercial, schools, parks, railroad, pipeline, creeks, etc.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by IMFD62 View Post
    As a newbie, I will always say that I enjoy the hands on stuff as much as possible...
    I second this. What ever you do, make it hands on. Pulling hose, throwing ladders, size up... like the others have mentioned.

    Tell them something, and they will forget.
    Show them something, and they will learn.
    But make them do it, and they will understand.

    Just my 2 cents. Nice job to you and the others for taking the initiative with the new guy. It probably just seems like common sense to you and your crew, but I assure you it isn't all that common unfortunately.

    Stay safe.
    Nothing is as unimpressive as someone who is unwilling to learn.

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    Pull lines. Pack lines. Throw ladders.

    The major thing with pulling lines is have them run the line around objects. Try to get to a specific point. This will show them multiple things. First how to pull and pack the line. Second how to move around objects. Third how far there hose will reach.

    I'm not sure your set up or anything but with us we have a ladder truck with 5 ladders in the rear chute. Have them throw every ladder by themselves (if possible) and yes throwing a 35 ft 2 section by yourself is possible.

    Make sure they know how to run a saw. Make sure they know how to take apart that saw and put it back together. Make sure they know which way the chain goes and how to diagnose problems.

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    Speaking as a relatively new volunteer, what I needed help with was:

    1) Learning our district and those of the departments we often do mutual aid with. This is very important for me because I might be bringing one of the 3rd or 4th due trucks or responding direct to the scene if we need crew. Knowing not just where roads are but shortcuts, where you cannot take an engine, where waterpoints are, etc. I'm really dependent on other department members to learn this because our maps are virtually non-existent of this area. Many on the department are very familiar with the area but I just moved up here a few months ago so finding out where stuff is is a big thing for me.

    2) Ropes, ladders, truck setup (fittings, hoses and so on), etc. Yes, you learn about this in the fire classes but it never hurts to gain more hands on experience and learning the tips and tricks that people have figured out. For me ropes is a perishable skill so I have to have guidance and practice to make sure I am learning/remembering stuff correctly.

    3) It never hurts to get out your stuff and do a PPE confidence course using whatever props your department has. More time spent in your turnouts the more comfortable you are.

    FF1 classes, which I am in now, is packing a lot of stuff into a small package. There is always room to expand and practice skills that were learned and might have gotten rusty.

    Going through trucks is always a good thing. Since I'm not FF1 certified yet, I can't go in anyway so being the gofer and learning to do stuff like water supply is where I'm most useful at.

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    Wow. There is a lot of good training information on here. Not just for probies either, for anyone. Also, again, it is commendable to take a new guy under your wings and try to help them. I had people do that for me, and I try to do it for others.

    As stated earlier, definately if there are any standards they have to meet to get off probation, work on those things. Depending on your department, showing them how to run an engine (you say to don't really do this either..good training for you as well) is pretty important. Smaller departments especially run into situations where different people are needed to run a truck. Everyone needs to know how, so they can take over in an emergency.

    In teaching them the ropes, it is important to share information with them, but do it in a way that is beneficial to them. What I mean is that one hydrant that opens the opposite way of every other hydrant in your district, let them try to open it and struggle for a bit (not enough to do damage). I can tell you from experience that you will always remember where that hydrant is (haha). Same goes for that tricky chainsaw, that truck that it is best to start 2nd gear, and several other things.

    Share experiences with them. Tell them about things you have seen in fires. Things that have worked, haven't worked, and general information that can help them. When doing training, try to recreate situations like entaglements and such...a lot can be done with a few people.

    Most importantly, have fun and be safe. Use this as a learning experience for them and you. Know that you are helping to shape a career and take it as seriously as it is.

    Stay safe.

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