Thread: Brush Trucks

  1. #1
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    Default Brush Trucks

    So here's another one for you guys.


    We are also specing a brush truck. So what do you think about the rear axles? Single wheels vs dual wheels? Mostly looking for information as far as off road.

    Thanks

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    What kind of weight, terrain, and size are we looking at? Need more info.

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    DRW will give you a higher weight capacity than SRW. From MY experience, if its sole purpose is to go offroad and fight fires, i would go with SRW. We have both in our department and I've never seen our SRW truck get stuck while our DRW truck has been stuck numerous times while they were both operating in the same terrain and they are both very similarly equipped. But, like the previous poster said, we need a little more info. Just my .02 cents.

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    Single for truck beds up to 4000 #'s bed weight,Dual's for truck beds over 4000 #'s bed weight.

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    Have to consider how much weight.. etc. As others have pointed out.

    With that said, I mostly see duals run. Good news if you blow one of the duals on a rock, you can still drive enough to get out of the woods.
    I am now a past chief and the views, opinions, and comments are mine and mine alone. I do not speak for any department or in any official capacity. Although, they would be smart to listen to me.

    "The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on the list."

    "When tempted to fight fire with fire, remember that the Fire Department usually uses water."

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    We have had one DRW brush truck and you had better be paying attention to where you was at or you would be stuck. The SRW trucks could go places that the DWR would get stuck. I'm not talking about a mud holes but just soft ground in general. I think alot of it has to do with where you are located and the soil types for your area.

    Two things to look at is what are your neighbor fire departments using and what are the farmers using to feed and chore with? In western Oklahoma you will see very few SRW trucks feeding cows and in NE Missouri you will see almost no DRW feeding cows. Once again it comes down to soil type.

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    DRW with 2x4 are hard surface only,4x4 any surface. SRW 2x4 or 4x4 most any surface.

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    I would definitely go with duals in the rear. I look at it this way, if it's close to the the road the "Pavement Princesses" can handle it, but I'm taking my Brush Engine into areas that normally may not have a vehicle being used there in mind. I have professionally seen many outside tires blown/cut/torn/etc and the vehicle was still able to keep going and help put the fire out or limp out of the area to the awaiting mechanic.

    As far as all-wheel drive I would say pay the extra money, it's well worth it. Don't limit yourself because I have professionally said "I wish Chief would have opted for the all-wheel drive version" while digging a Unit out. Trust me, it sucks.

    We took delivery of (2) BME Urban Interface Units and they work great for us. We upgraded the Pumps to 1,000 gpm so if needed we can use as a Reserve Engine. I took one on a large fire where Structure Protection was a HUGE concern and the Rig performed awesome. The short wheelbase came in real handy around the "McMansions" we were protecting.
    "Be LOUD, Be PROUD..... It just might save your can someday when goin' through an intersection!!!!!"

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    Eat til you're sleepy..... Sleep til you're hungry..... And repeat.....

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    Our department has two SRW and two DRW and it seems that the SRW can get around with less difficulty than the DRW. The current discussion in our department is Super Singles on the next grass rig. Trying to find the best of both worlds.

    Singles don't have to cut another track so they get stuck less. Duals carry more weight. Like others have pointed out, you really need to evaluate your soil conditions and the weight you want to carry.

    Make sure you have four wheel drive. Our policy is that when you transition from road to off road you engage the four wheel drive.

    Additionally, if your apparatus is automatic with the "tow/haul" mode ensure that your operators are engaging it when they leave the pavement. That rig is hauling quite a bit of weight so this will save your transmission.

    Just my thoughts,
    Walt
    Train like you want to fight.
    www.kvfd.net

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    Have both, with one unit a F550 converted to super-singles. It will go places the other truck buries in, even though it weighs much more.

    http://www.tarkingtonvfd.net/Equipment/55/2011Ford.htm

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    Name:  Demos 102mod.jpg
Views: 1699
Size:  32.4 KB

    We faced the same dilema a few months back when purchasing 2-pumpers and 1-booster. We opted to go with super singles for the reasons mentioned. Additionally we went with a low gear transmission to help ensure not getting stuck as well as a gasoline engine to further reduce weight along with an aluminum bed.

    While the photo is a demo, ours will be very close in design (except cab and a half) and be ready in less than 2-weeks.

    Be safe.
    Last edited by STATION2; 05-01-2012 at 03:43 PM.
    Stay low and move it in.

    Be safe.


    Larry

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    BUMP!

    Larry - how has your new truck worked out for you? Who built it?


    Quote Originally Posted by STATION2 View Post
    Attachment 22010

    We faced the same dilema a few months back when purchasing 2-pumpers and 1-booster. We opted to go with super singles for the reasons mentioned. Additionally we went with a low gear transmission to help ensure not getting stuck as well as a gasoline engine to further reduce weight along with an aluminum bed.

    While the photo is a demo, ours will be very close in design (except cab and a half) and be ready in less than 2-weeks.

    Be safe.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mitchkrat View Post
    BUMP!

    Larry - how has your new truck worked out for you? Who built it?
    We have two Skeeter brush trucks with super single rears. 400 gallons of H2O and 10 gallons of foam with a remote turret on the front bumper. We haven't had to use them much yet but I really like them. Good ground clearance, good suspension travel, and a pretty good overall design.

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    We are looking at building a 550 with 400~500 gallons on super singles - want a V10 and a aluminum bed to keep it light.

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    Figure the tank & water at 10 lbs per gallon and add 500 lbs for P. pump and gear. You are rapidly approaching 6,500 lb load with a crew and some hose. (10,000 lb gvw) Be sure you oversize the rated GVW because almost all commercial vehicles are made to sit empty 80% of the time. We are running a Mack single axle with 2,000 gal tank. We are on the 3rd set of springs. I agree with the guys who remarked about the single RW being a better choice for operating in steep terrain with clay soils. Singles get a better bite when they can dig down to the hard stuff.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kuh shise View Post
    (10,000 lb gvw)
    I don't know what SRW F550's are rated for, but DRW F550's come off the line rated at 17,950 GVWR. Some F550's are rated at 19,500... I can't imagine SRW being less than 14,000... Someone correct me if I'm wrong, please. Hell, regular F350 pickups are rated over 10,000, and the dually versions are around 13,000. All that being said, our dump body F350 diesel at work tares out on the scales at around 9,000 pounds.

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