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  1. #1
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    Default Fire service education for teens

    Our VFD does a lot of fire safety education for the younger elementary kids, but does anyone know if there are any programs for young teens? Specifically I'm looking at coming up with a program for home schooled middle school and maybe high school age kids that shows how things like math, science, health, biology etc. is used in the fire and EMS services. It would be used to teach kids about how the jobs in emergency services use those subjects in the course of their jobs, and encourage kids to have a reason to take more interest in those subjects. If any of you know of any courses like this let me know. Thanks.


  2. #2
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    In the past I have taught a couple of programs in the middle school setting, one of which is an educational program on spinal injuries and high-risk activities for middle school students. The class will briefly discuss the role of the spine, how it can be injured, the affects of those injuries, and what types of high-risk activities can cause those injuries.

    Another class can be very basic first aid, or basic water rescue.

    I have also taught classes on the affects of juvenile firesetting to that age group as well. It talks about the legal and other long-term concequences to their famalies and themselves, as well as affects on the community and the risks firefighting poses to firefighters.

    If you want anymore info, just e-mail me at bcallahan@bpfd1.org

    Unfortuantly, the middle school admin that serves my current district is not overlly receptive to fire department programs, so right now, things are sorta stalled until I can work my way into the door.
    Train to fight the fires you fight.

  3. #3
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    My department aswell would like to move our elementry program for fire education up to the middle and high school crowd's aswell. I think the elementry portion of the program is by far the most important, but I also think we should continue on till they are out of school. We have support from our local school district, but we don't have a plan.

    We were going to bring 3 different levels of the program to the school, continueing our younger kids program from the last few years. But were clueless as to how to run the middle school and high school program. We do know we'd like to bring "Recuritment and Retention" into the high school program, with some "shock and awe" like videos, and instead of the whole program being one big fire prevention, we want to more amaze, and bring interest in for the second half of the program.

    At some point we'd love to develop a program for the parents aswell, because funding keeps going down, we'd like the community to support us again when the borough wants to cut funding again.
    Firefighter 1/ PA EMT-B

  4. #4
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    I am just going to copy and past an article on our teen program:

    Prevention Education Has No Age!
    Having two parents serving as volunteer firefighters left Madison Definbaugh and her two siblings home alone frequently. Her mother, fighter/EMT Candice McDonald often worried if her kids would know what to do if there was a disaster while they were home alone. McDonald says, “They are good responsible kids, but most adults don’t even know what to do in case of a disaster, how would my teenagers know? I worried my husband and I would be out on a call helping someone else’s family and a disaster would strike at home.” This prompted the idea behind Ohio Fire Corps’ “Enhance for the Chance” youth preparedness campaign.

    Through this campaign Madison, age 12, travels with her mom to speak to other youth about enhancing their preparedness knowledge for the chance of a disaster. Madi also utilizes the Home Safety Council’s All Ways Fire Safe at Home curriculum provided by the National Fire Corps office to teach lessons to small groups on safety. Through this campaign Ohio Fire Corps will be distributing 500 bracelets with the campaign slogan, “Enhance for the Chance”. Bracelets will be given to those youth who complete a pre/posttest after listening to Madi’s preparedness tips based on FEMA’s http://www.ready.gov/know-facts. Madi’s efforts have not gone unnoticed. She will be helping FEMA out as a panelist for the Youth Preparedness Workshop in Columbus, Ohio this May.

    McDonald, who also serves as the Ohio Fire Corps State Advocate, is not a beginner at developing peer mentoring programs. In 1999, she was a contributing co-author to a resource guide for professionals published by Brookes Publishing. Her chapter titled “Driving the System through Young Adult Involvement and Leadership” focuses on the importance of using youth to motivate and engage other youth. She says, “Fire prevention and preparedness tends to focus on elementary kids. The middle school and teenage population is often forgotten. This is the age group that is home alone. These youth need educated to know what to do in case an adult isn’t around when a disaster would strike”.

    To contact Candice and Madi to find out how to develop your own peer education program for youth, visit www.ohiofirecorps.com and complete the contact form. It is their goal to see the “Enhance for a Chance” campaign go nationwide.

  5. #5
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    johnsb: Our local high school physics classes are exposed to hydraulics (friction loss, nozzle flows, reaction forces, etc.) in the classroom setting. Then on one particular day (usually in May with warmer weather) are given the opportunity to calculate engine pressures, flow rates, and reaction forces. Tell the pump operator the engine pressure desired and then actually hold a charged line. Experienced firefighters are assigned to each line, but students are given the opportunity to hold a charged line under close supervision. It is a great way to re-enforce the physics lessons while exposing students to the fire service. Of course it helps when the Physics Teacher is a part of the Fire Department.

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