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Thread: Vehicle Fire Attack

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    Default Vehicle Fire Attack

    So we have all been made aware of the danger of car hood struts, so with this in mind what does everyone use as their preferred method for extinguishing an engine compartment fire? We had this discussion at the station with just a few us and wanted to see what others think about the topic. Keeping in mind not to be in front of the vehicle in the danger zone of an exploding hood strut.n

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    Front bumper line or a crosslay and take a tool with you. If it is not serious, try to pop the latch and open the hood. If it is a little more involved, use the tool to make a hole big enough for the nozzle to fit in, set on wide fog and go to town. If you want the book answer take the time to break out the piercing nozzle.
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    We usually deploy our 1 3/4 inch cross lay try and get a knock down from underneath or around the wheel well. I have seen some departments are using a cordless circular saw to cut a large triangle in the hood and open it up to attack it from the top staying on the side of the vehicle away from the exploding car hood struts. You said you take a tool to possibly make a hole large enough to put the nozzle in, are you using a hooligan?

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    Fog nozzle (the only thing we use them for....) approach from an angle, avoid the bumper and tires. K/D the bulk of the fire on the rest of the car, then put the knob on full fog, close the bail a bit, and lay it on the ground and push it under the car to K/D any fire under there and to cool the bumper and engine. Pull the hood release inside the car, or if burned out, use the fork end of the halligan to twist the cable to release the latch. Open the hood right up, put the fire out. Go home. In the one in one thousand times that the halligan twisting the cable doesnt work, use the rabbit tool to pop the hood.
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    Pretty much similar to FWDbuff's - use good angled approach, fog to knock it down, etc.

    If we can't pull the release, we'll try the fork/twist on the hood cable through the grill. If that don't work, the power saw with a metal blade does quick work at making a cut around the latch.

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    Quote Originally Posted by WBFD25 View Post
    Pretty much similar to FWDbuff's - use good angled approach, fog to knock it down, etc.

    If we can't pull the release, we'll try the fork/twist on the hood cable through the grill. If that don't work, the power saw with a metal blade does quick work at making a cut around the latch.
    I see you are from Iowa, N.W. Iowa here myself. I was in Ames the weekend for fire school, saw a few folks from W. Burlington there.

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    Engine: pulls an 1 3/4" line, usually the bumper line, attacks from the best angle, does what it can through the radiator or wheel well, knocks anything down in the passenger compartment. Truck: opens the vehicle, does a quick primary and tries the hood latch, if that don't do it, we take the partner saw and cut the hood straight across about a foot from the seem and props it open. Offering full access to the engine compartment. The engine puts out whats there. Final wet down and clean up. 30 minutes start to finish.
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    The old navy applicator (pineapple) nozzles work well to get under dashes and wheel wells. With the newer plastic fuel tanks , I try to keep everybody off their knees around a vehicle fire.
    ?

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    I'm on a truck, but I'll give this a go. Currently, how things have been happening are as follows.
    Regardless of engine compartment or fully involved/passenger compartment, the engine company starts at the rear, and cools the gas tank quickly. As their working their way to the front, the truck company is popping the hood, via either the hood release lever in the passenger compartment, than taking the grill out (for a little extra room) and opening the hood like a normal human being. Sometimes this chord is gone, so we need to either V cut the hood, or manually pull the cable by hacking at the front of the car. if this is taking too long, while the hood is being V cut, I like to take the duckbill on the haligon, and kinking the hood near the firewall on the side. so the engine company can get some kind of water on the fire. We have had no problems with this method, and it all happens allot faster than it seems now that I write it out.
    Firefighter 1/ PA EMT-B

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    dont forget through the headlights.
    ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by JSMV72 View Post
    I see you are from Iowa, N.W. Iowa here myself. I was in Ames the weekend for fire school, saw a few folks from W. Burlington there.
    Guilty as charged. Training class on Sat followed by the Halligan courses on Sunday were my things this year.

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    Agrees with everyone.

    For anyone interested I have an introduction to vehicle fire powerpoint (geared for a rookie class), a more comprehensive vehicle fire powerpoint which includes some command-level and apparatus positioning material, and a large vehicle fire powerpoint which i would be willing to share if anyone is interested.

    Just e-mail me at bcallahan@bpfd1.org.
    Train to fight the fires you fight.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LaFireEducator View Post
    Agrees with everyone.

    For anyone interested I have an introduction to vehicle fire powerpoint (geared for a rookie class), a more comprehensive vehicle fire powerpoint which includes some command-level and apparatus positioning material, and a large vehicle fire powerpoint which i would be willing to share if anyone is interested.

    Just e-mail me at bcallahan@bpfd1.org.
    I'd love to have these, Can I PM you my email address? I'll PM you anyway its quicker... haha
    Firefighter 1/ PA EMT-B

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    You can also use the bolt cutters or a saw if thats your thing and cut the hinges up near the cab, then just roll the whole hood back off the front of the car.
    brian cameron likes this.
    Bring enough hose.

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    In addition to what was said here....the truck company (car fire is engine and truck response) blocks the street with the rig protecting the engine crew from getting hit.

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    Just a thought. Recently (sorry I can't remember where) there was an article regarding approaching at an angle. The notable point was that how much safer do we really think that is? Given that bumpers have multiple attachments and shock absorbing devices, what's the actual chance one will blow off and go straight vs. having a greater attachment to one side causing it to pivot or come off at an angle? What's the specific danger of the side approach? Why take any risk for a totaled vehicle unless you have possible entrapment?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Picc.93Truck View Post
    I'm on a truck, but I'll give this a go. Currently, how things have been happening are as follows.
    Regardless of engine compartment or fully involved/passenger compartment, the engine company starts at the rear, and cools the gas tank quickly. As their working their way to the front, the truck company is popping the hood, via either the hood release lever in the passenger compartment, than taking the grill out (for a little extra room) and opening the hood like a normal human being. Sometimes this chord is gone, so we need to either V cut the hood, or manually pull the cable by hacking at the front of the car. if this is taking too long, while the hood is being V cut, I like to take the duckbill on the haligon, and kinking the hood near the firewall on the side. so the engine company can get some kind of water on the fire. We have had no problems with this method, and it all happens allot faster than it seems now that I write it out.

    does your dept start an engine and a truck to a car fire???
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    I start hitting it from about 20-25' away to cool it a bit before approaching closer. Typically we use the 1 1/2" bumper line. We only send an engine, unless it's a larger commercial vehicle, then maybe a second enging if the dispatchers' thinking. Once I've hit it for 20-30 seconds I'll come in close and starting hitting any easily reachable fire as the second guy accesses the hood. Once the bulk of the fire is knocked down, if there's any fire underneath, I' put it on wide fog and shove the nozzle under to act as a sprinkler. If the fuel tank is rutured, we'll hook up the ProPack and foam it. Other than that, a liberal application of water.

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