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    Default The True Definition of Broadside Hit

    A woman driving through a green light and had her car struck on the passenger's side by a small two-door car. The young driver and front passenger of that car were speeding through the City streets and ran the red light. The driver stated he never saw the red car until it was too late.

    This is just an excellent example of what a 'broadside hit' or 'T-bone collision' is all about. The passenger's side was pushed in so far that the door was almost at the centerline of the car. The woman driver survived with serious injuries.

    Use this scenario to think about how you would do extrication if in fact, you had this and occupants in the red car were trapped. Sidewall opening and/or removal. Roof removal. Dash entrapment. Etc, etc. Remember also, the battery is inside the car, under the rear seat seat cushion on this big old GM.
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    A close-up view of the impact side shows how the passenger door and the rear side body panel are crushed inside the vehicle; over the rocker on that side of the car. You can see the passenger's front seat cushion exposed underneath the front door.

    What about door removal? Think about how you would make this 2-door into a 3-door. This would be one example where extrication work would be a challenge on this side of the vehicle if occupants were trapped up against this sidewall and door.
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    The view of the interior of the Buick shows how the car has bent due to the collision forces. There was no extrication here. The lone occupant was the driver and she had unbuckled and collapsed out onto the gravel by the time the first FD company arrived on scene.

    The police car in the background is just about where the actual collision occurred. This car slid and spun from the intersection, over the curb and the sidewalk, and onto the gravel area on the corner due to the impact forces; and this was the bigger car of the two!
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    Luckily there was only the driver. But imagining if there were more occupants; bring all patients out of the driver side after a b-post removal, should be able to bash out most of the center console, looks like a front wheel drive. Taking the roof would make for easier access if you have to work at freeing a patient. No sense in trying to work on the impact side of that mess unless you have to.

    Chief, thanks for teaching us at TCC this month. Great to meet you!
    ~Drew
    Firefighter/EMT/Technical Rescue
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    I've had a wreck like this one where there were other occupants. Maybe not as bad, but close.

    From what I remember (this was >10 years ago), we basically attacked this "top down" to expose where the person was trapped, because trying to attack from the side would mean to pry or take action against the victim.

    Eventually, we did have to start "picking" at the sides, very carefully/slowly to try to get enough of the person free. Eventually it came down to the foot being stuck up under the dash and required a LOT of dashwork.

    Taking another look at this particular wreck, if there were passenger side occupants, it would be a pretty brutal injury, at least a serious head injury.
    I am now a past chief and the views, opinions, and comments are mine and mine alone. I do not speak for any department or in any official capacity. Although, they would be smart to listen to me.

    "The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on the list."

    "When tempted to fight fire with fire, remember that the Fire Department usually uses water."

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    Ron, you know me and air bags so I have to ask. Do you know if there was a second collision involving the front of the car? Riveria's weren't around for side air bags and normally a "t-bone" accident like this shouldn't deploy the front bags. Also, it would be appreciated if you could e-mail the pix to me. Thanx
    Steve Dragon
    FFII, Fire Instructor II, Fire Officer I, Fire Appartus Driver Operator Certified
    Volunteers are never "off duty".
    http://www.bufd7.org

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    Cool Article from Firefighting in Canada Magazine: Moving a vehicle to access a patient

    Here is an option to reduce time in a side impact collision when the vehicle is still resting against an object such a tree, utility pole or another vehicle.
    This is a case where there is an exception to the rule. This will not work all the time but knowing that this is possible it may come in handy sometime in your career
    Extrication Tips: July 2011 - Fire Fighting in Canada
    Cheers!
    Firedog7

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    consider cross ramming from the transmission housing to relocate the impact side, side removal then roof off.
    However with rear seated passengers there may be little room for ramming internally

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    Quote Originally Posted by firedog7 View Post
    Here is an option to reduce time in a side impact collision when the vehicle is still resting against an object such a tree, utility pole or another vehicle.
    This is a case where there is an exception to the rule. This will not work all the time but knowing that this is possible it may come in handy sometime in your career
    Extrication Tips: July 2011 - Fire Fighting in Canada
    Cheers!
    Firedog7
    You KNOW I'm OK with this and I have a Variant. Use a winch with snatch blocks once the situation has been CAREFULLY analyzed and proper conditions for a winchoff/pryoff have been satisfied. While this is being done you can be making access on the side/roof area away from the hit side, AND PRACTICE IT BEFORE you need it. MORE than once. Good place for a Towtruck with a TRAINED operator(did I say that in my out loud voice?) T.C.

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