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Thread: Open Cab Truck usage

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    Quote Originally Posted by johnsb View Post
    None of those trucks were designed with any rollover protection. Lap belts will barely keep you in the truck. In trucks that old, I wouldn't give anyone good odds in a rollover. And with canopy cabs, you're also exposed to high decibels and weather.
    Why are you exposed to high decibels? Don't your sirens and horns point foward? Do you have sirens behind the cab? We had open cab Macks for decades....never had a sound issue from the horns and/or sirens.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

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    The cab on the Mack CF Scope could not be enclosed, there is not room between the boom and the cab to add four doors. The truck was rebuilt to upgrade the aerial with all new controls,pistons, hoses, new motor,auto trans, axles, lighting, body work, paint, new aluminum diamond plate steps, & half doors.If we had 1.2 million dollars we would have purchased a new 2013 Aerialscope with a 4-door cab !!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bones42 View Post
    Why are you exposed to high decibels? Don't your sirens and horns point foward? Do you have sirens behind the cab? We had open cab Macks for decades....never had a sound issue from the horns and/or sirens.
    Open cab Macks had little or no insulation from engine noise. And if you are running with other apparatus behind you, you exposed to the noise from their sirens. As for the sirens pointing forward, you still get noise from the sirens and horns, remember, a lot of those trucks had them mounted on the roof. I guarantee anyone who took lots of runs on open cab trucks has SOME hearing loss.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FyredUp View Post
    And a fully enclosed cab is little more than a paint shaker filled with bodies if seatbelts aren't worn.

    We are responsible for our own safety and your comment about seatbelts is just as valid no matter what the cab style. Hence it is a moot point in cab design safety.
    A modern Pierce or other truck has a LOT more padding on the interior than older trucks, and they are less likely to have hand tools in them. Not to mention Pierces' at least have built in roll over protection. Old cabs would just be crushed. Yes seatbelts give a clear advantage and should be worn, but cab design is NOT a moot point. You can install 5 point harness' in a 80's truck but it won't do any good when the cab roof gets crushed down on you in a rollover. It's the total package that counts.

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    Quote Originally Posted by johnsb View Post
    Open cab Macks had little or no insulation from engine noise. And if you are running with other apparatus behind you, you exposed to the noise from their sirens. As for the sirens pointing forward, you still get noise from the sirens and horns, remember, a lot of those trucks had them mounted on the roof. I guarantee anyone who took lots of runs on open cab trucks has SOME hearing loss.
    My career FD offered hearing protection for EVERY riding position for well over 20 years. Further if we are not capable of making the decision that noise is possibly causing hearing damage, and getting our own pair of ear muffs or ear plugs, then we quite possibly deserve what we get.
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnsb View Post
    A modern Pierce or other truck has a LOT more padding on the interior than older trucks, and they are less likely to have hand tools in them. Not to mention Pierces' at least have built in roll over protection. Old cabs would just be crushed. Yes seatbelts give a clear advantage and should be worn, but cab design is NOT a moot point. You can install 5 point harness' in a 80's truck but it won't do any good when the cab roof gets crushed down on you in a rollover. It's the total package that counts.
    Seriously if you believe padding in the cab of a fire engine will offer any protection at all in a roll over you live in fantasy land. As for your ascertation that fewer tools are mounted in the cab today my trip to the Fire rescue International show in Chicago last weekend would prove you so very wrong. At least 1/3 of the vehicles I looked at had tools mounted inside the cab. Everything from flashlights, TICs, axes, to sets of irons, and more. These tools are all mounted in approved brackets so they won't become projectiles in the cab, but that doesn't stop you from being tossed into them in a roll over or a hard collision.

    I don't want to break your Pierce Kool-Aid drinking heart but Pierce didn't invent fire apparatus roll over protection and aren't the only company offering it either. But further, please find me PROOF of all these older cabbed custom pumpers with crushed roofs from roll overs. I would believe 100% that commercial cabs would be crushed because they are not designed with that protection built in.

    Seatbelts MUST be worn to insure that any inherent safety features, such as roll over protection and airbags, do their job properly. I don't give a damn how well the inside of that cab is padded if you aren't belted in and experience a 55 mph collision or rollover you will be beaten badly and perhaps killed if you fly around unrestrained inside the cab. Further your insistence that the use of seatbelts isn't as critical an element as cab design in passenger safety during a rollover incident makes me question your logic at all on this topic.

    With your the sky is falling attitude I am surprised we aren't reading of thousands of firefighters being killed each year because they dare to use the apparatus that they have instead of marching in to the village hall of Hooterville, population 250, and demandng a half million dollar enclosed cab pumper. My point? YES, enclosed cab fire apparatus are safer, but that does not make an older, safely operated, canopy cab pumper (Which by the way is the proper name for the type of rig you are talking about. An open cab pumper has no roof at all over the entire passenger area.) an automatic death trap.
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    Quote Originally Posted by FyredUp View Post
    Seriously if you believe padding in the cab of a fire engine will offer any protection at all in a roll over you live in fantasy land. As for your ascertation that fewer tools are mounted in the cab today my trip to the Fire rescue International show in Chicago last weekend would prove you so very wrong. At least 1/3 of the vehicles I looked at had tools mounted inside the cab. Everything from flashlights, TICs, axes, to sets of irons, and more. These tools are all mounted in approved brackets so they won't become projectiles in the cab, but that doesn't stop you from being tossed into them in a roll over or a hard collision.

    I don't want to break your Pierce Kool-Aid drinking heart but Pierce didn't invent fire apparatus roll over protection and aren't the only company offering it either. But further, please find me PROOF of all these older cabbed custom pumpers with crushed roofs from roll overs. I would believe 100% that commercial cabs would be crushed because they are not designed with that protection built in.

    Seatbelts MUST be worn to insure that any inherent safety features, such as roll over protection and airbags, do their job properly. I don't give a damn how well the inside of that cab is padded if you aren't belted in and experience a 55 mph collision or rollover you will be beaten badly and perhaps killed if you fly around unrestrained inside the cab. Further your insistence that the use of seatbelts isn't as critical an element as cab design in passenger safety during a rollover incident makes me question your logic at all on this topic.

    With your the sky is falling attitude I am surprised we aren't reading of thousands of firefighters being killed each year because they dare to use the apparatus that they have instead of marching in to the village hall of Hooterville, population 250, and demandng a half million dollar enclosed cab pumper. My point? YES, enclosed cab fire apparatus are safer, but that does not make an older, safely operated, canopy cab pumper (Which by the way is the proper name for the type of rig you are talking about. An open cab pumper has no roof at all over the entire passenger area.) an automatic death trap.
    That time of the month????

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    Quote Originally Posted by johnsb View Post
    That time of the month????
    Funny that you chose to be a smart azz and not comment on how I decimated your ridiculous comments. Especially about seatbelts. Or calling canopy cab fire apparatus open cabs.

    Although I suppose when you can't debate from a basis of knowledge being a smart azz is all you have left.

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    So, is it against NFPA to ride in the open cab section of an apparatus?? FASNY (Fireman's Association of NY) says yes as long as seatbelts are worn it's a go........... That's what our Chief said........
    BE ALERT AND STAY ALIVE
    ASST CHIEF
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