Why register? ...To Enhance Your Experience
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Forum Member FyredUp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 1999
    Location
    Rural Wisconsin, Retired from the burbs of Milwaukee
    Posts
    9,844

    Default Replacing ladder halyards

    How many of you replace the halyards on your FDs ladders inhouse? Do you use 3/8 inch manilla rope? Do you do the old fashion and incredibly strong splicing the rope back into itself to do the loops?

    Why am I asking? Because I did 3 halyard replacements on 2 - 24's and a 35 footer on my career FD and it seems everyone that walked by asked me what I was doing and why when I was doing the splices...So I got curious about how other FDs were doing haklyards.

    I can't wait to see how ssomeone turns this topic controversial!!
    Crazy, but that's how it goes
    Millions of people living as foes
    Maybe it's not too late
    To learn how to love, and forget how to hate


  2. #2
    Forum Member FIREMECH1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    HUSKER LAND
    Posts
    2,425

    Default

    I do them every 5-8 years on all the ladders. I use 3/8 on ladders up to 24', 1/2 on the larger ones. If the ropes have been burnt, they get replaced ASAP.

    FM1
    I'm the one Fire and Rescue calls, when they need to be Rescued.

    Quote Originally Posted by EastKyFF
    "Firemens gets antsies. Theys wants to goes to fires. Sometimeses they haves to waits."

  3. #3
    Forum Member FWDbuff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Pee-Ayy!
    Posts
    7,354

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FyredUp View Post
    How many of you replace the halyards on your FDs ladders inhouse? Do you use 3/8 inch manilla rope? Do you do the old fashion and incredibly strong splicing the rope back into itself to do the loops?

    Why am I asking? Because I did 3 halyard replacements on 2 - 24's and a 35 footer on my career FD and it seems everyone that walked by asked me what I was doing and why when I was doing the splices...So I got curious about how other FDs were doing haklyards.

    I can't wait to see how ssomeone turns this topic controversial!!
    We have done them in-house several times. We have a member of the community who used to be an active member (but is no longer) who is an avid sailboater, who does beautiful splicing- whenever we do replace the halyards (manila) we get him to come and do the splicing in exchange for a pizza lunch.
    "Loyalty Above all Else. Except Honor."

  4. #4
    Forum Member GTRider245's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Augusta,GA
    Posts
    3,056

    Default

    I did all of ours two years ago. Went with 1/2" CMC Ladder Line on the extension ladders. Didn't use the clamps, just a clove hitch and safety knot. So far they are holding up great, and they are tested and rated.
    Career Firefighter
    Volunteer Captain

    -Professional in Either Role-

    Quote Originally Posted by Rescue101 View Post
    I don't mind fire rolling over my head. I just don't like it rolling UNDER my a**.

  5. #5
    Forum Member snowball's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Just North of South Central
    Posts
    2,740

    Default

    Our department used to do them. We use synthetic stuff now.
    I learned to braid hemp rope as a floor hand on a drilling rig right out of high school.
    It's definitely a dying art.
    IAFF

  6. #6
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    KENTUCKY
    Posts
    410

    Default

    http://www.novabraid.com/rope/polytec.html
    We bought a spool of this polyester hollow braid rope.
    The 1/2" will fit through the pulleys and gives you something to grip. Got it without the urethane coating to reduce slippery when wet factor. Splices easy and neat.
    Last edited by LFD2203; 06-20-2012 at 05:24 PM. Reason: inserted link

  7. #7
    MembersZone Subscriber tajm611's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    2,071

    Default

    Manila but currently being phased out with synthetic. A retired firefighter comes in once or twice a year and shows many of the new guys how to do the splicing. I'd say a good number know how and could teach it themselves but the pride and joy the man gets out of it is worth having him come in. Captains usually do random reviews of the apparatus and you'll catch **** if the halyards aren't nice and tight on any apparatus you've signed your name to.
    ‎"I was always taught..." Four words impacting fire service education in the most negative of ways. -Bill Carey

  8. #8
    MembersZone Subscriber tree68's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Jefferson County, NY USA
    Posts
    2,264

    Default

    Ah, yes - marlinspike seamanship. I can do some basic stuff, splice-wise, but I'm not anything resembling an expert.

    Our fire load means that the halyards are more likely to rot than wear out. I haven't replaced any of them myself, but that doesn't mean it hasn't been done.
    Opinions my own. Standard disclaimers apply.

    Everyone goes home. Safety begins with you.

  9. #9
    Forum Member FyredUp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 1999
    Location
    Rural Wisconsin, Retired from the burbs of Milwaukee
    Posts
    9,844

    Default

    I can splice a loop, splice 2 ropes together, splice single rope into a continuous loop, and do an end splice to finish off the end of a rope. I was taught by a crusty old jake fire instructor.

    I have been doing this for probably the better part of 25 years. I rather enjoy doing it.
    Crazy, but that's how it goes
    Millions of people living as foes
    Maybe it's not too late
    To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

  10. #10
    Forum Member snowball's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Just North of South Central
    Posts
    2,740

    Default

    Electrical tape and patience. I was taught "T" braids.(splices are for wire) that's a butt braid with a 90 degree coming out of it, twined into the butts. That's so the operator could "float" the bull tongs to us on the floor without having to wait for the floor to unchain them.

    The nice thing about hemp? When it's used up, and full of oil and pipe dope, a 40' coil burns hot enough to warm up three hands and three cans of Dinty Moore stew at lunch in the dead of winter. I'm talkin 1 1/4" hemp factory rope.
    IAFF

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. LDH Storz replacing
    By LVFD301 in forum The Engineer
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 06-12-2011, 07:47 PM
  2. Halyards
    By octhefirefool in forum Fireground Tactics
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 08-20-2010, 05:42 PM
  3. Ladder Halyards
    By FFEMT2159 in forum Volunteer Forum
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 02-13-2009, 10:50 AM
  4. replacing mini
    By jwfisher in forum Apparatus Innovation
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-05-2006, 07:24 PM
  5. Ladder Halyards?
    By Fire40man in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: 11-23-2004, 02:45 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts