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  1. #1
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    Default What is your favorite hose load for the cross-lays?

    We just took delivery of a new 2000 gal. tanker pumper with a 1000 gpm pump. The cross lays are about six foot from the ground and we are trying to decide what hose load might be the easiest to deploy with that height in mind. We usually run a short crew so we need a hose load that one person can deploy and flax out. We currently run 150 ft. of 1 3/4 inch on our first due Engine with a flat load. We can shoulder carry one half the load and pull the other half off the truck as we advance. The only issue I see with doing this is trying to keep the shoulder load half way secure at first while pulling it off the truck in the air that far. We have never tried a minute man load would it work any better? Just looking for ideas and suggestions, advantages and disadvantages.


  2. #2
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    I work at two seperate departments, and one we use a minute man, and the other we use the triple lay. They both have there advantages and disadvantages.... From where you are describing where the cross lays are, I don't think the minute man is the way to go...

    I think the triple lay would work out perfectly for you. Whenever we pull the triple lay, all they have to do is charge the hose, and it will flak itself out. Let me know if you need any help with knowing how to rack it or set it up.

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  3. #3
    Forum Member FyredUp's Avatar
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    Experiment with your guys to see what works best.

    All of the FDs I am a member of use the flat load with ears. we load one layer in the bed and then place short loops, usually just big enough to get your hand into on the second layer. We then load 100 feet and place long ears, usually a couple of feet long at the 100 foot mark. Then we finish loading the hose with the nozzle on top near the center of the bed. To unload the bed with one firefighter they put their arm through the long loops and grab the short loops to empty the bed. It is easy to load and after a couple of practices is easy to deploy.

    I personally love the Minute Man load. It is the easiest load to deploy around obstacles because you are carrying, not dragging hose. It is harder to train people to load and really only unloads off from one side of the engine.

    I personally HATE the triple fold. It is a pain in the butt to load, especially with guys that don't do it often. It is miserable to deploy if you have to make a 90 dgree turn right away off the engine. And it is impossible to carry if you wanted to take dry line into a building before charging it.
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    Forum Member MemphisE34a's Avatar
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    Your triple layer might be different than the one I am familiar with. I agree with difficulty if you have to immediately stretch to the front or rear of the apparatus, but I can't remember a time when it has ever been an issue.

    As far as your other two points, reloading is as easy as any other load with some practice and you can certainly stretch it dry. You can deploy any load dry, just don't charge it.
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  5. #5
    Let's talk fire trucks! BoxAlarm187's Avatar
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    I agree with Kramer. After using all of them, I'm a strong proponent of the triple-layer load.

    Even at our VFD, where we rarely run fires (but do countless auto accidents) all of the guys, even the old timers, have become fans of the triple-layer and could pack it with their eyes closed. We've found that it works well for our occupancies and usual apparatus positioning.

    The triple is a little more difficult to pull at 90 degrees off the rig, but we've yet to have it hinder our operations, either at the VFD or at work - where do fight quite a bit more fire.

    I think the minuteman has it's place - we run our 2.5" at work in a minuteman. Where long stretches are the norm, I've found it to be advantageous, but where it's a short stretch with a 200' preconnect, I've found that I end up with more hose at the door than I actually need, and spend more time chasing the kinks before making a push.

    As always, what works for one department may not work for all.
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  6. #6
    Forum Member FyredUp's Avatar
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    My point being I can CARRY the minuteman AND the flatload on my shoulder, at least the top 100 feet. Where there is no practical way to load 100 feet of the triple fold on your shoulder to carry it. Of course you can DRAG the triple fold inside the building dry. But trying dragging it around stock, or parked cars, or any other obstructon. I guarantee you that any load that can be carried can be laid out faster and neater in those circumstances than the triple fold.

    If the triple fold works for you I think that is fantastic!!
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  7. #7
    MembersZone Subscriber ffmedcbk1's Avatar
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    the triple is a problem in the snow or around any obstacles. i dont recommend it because of that.

    i like flat loads. you can use it and shoulder it pretty easily. it can be a drag load. also you can learn to do the "flip" and turn it into a minuteman by pulling it half way out and bear hugging it to the chest, then turn away from the rig.... it now is a minuteman load.

    do you get snow much in iowa? if you do, pull a triple in the snow to see how easy it isn't.
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  8. #8
    Back In Black ChiefKN's Avatar
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    We use the triple and I love it.

    Every type of loadout will have it's drawbacks.
    I am now a past chief and the views, opinions, and comments are mine and mine alone. I do not speak for any department or in any official capacity. Although, they would be smart to listen to me.

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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by ffmedcbk1 View Post
    the triple is a problem in the snow or around any obstacles. i dont recommend it because of that.

    i like flat loads. you can use it and shoulder it pretty easily. it can be a drag load. also you can learn to do the "flip" and turn it into a minuteman by pulling it half way out and bear hugging it to the chest, then turn away from the rig.... it now is a minuteman load.

    do you get snow much in iowa? if you do, pull a triple in the snow to see how easy it isn't.
    Let's see, snow in Iowa. Do bears do you know what in the woods, lol. Yeah we have years with way to much and years with not much. I think we will experiment with the triple load to see how we like it at some training.

  10. #10
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    We currently use the flat load. We have 150 ft. on our cross-lays and we start by stacking about one half straight up and down on one side and then make a small loop on the end and flip the hose down to the other side and start a stack on that side. We also leave pull loops to aid in pulling the load off. I have been starting training some new guys buy pulling the nozzle side off in a stack and doing a shoulder load with it. We then take the load to the entry point, lay it down and flack out the load. It seems to work well so far. Was just looking for other ideas on what to use.

  11. #11
    Forum Member FFEMT3634's Avatar
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    Gotta go with the triple layer..its a b**ch to re-lay but its a good deploying lay

  12. #12
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    Default This:

    To answer the OP, this:
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  13. #13
    Forum Member FyredUp's Avatar
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    I like this load. Easy to load and easy to unload.

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    We have changed it to add ears to make it even easier to unload.
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    I like that flat load. Simple, versatile, and always comes off smooth. By having a little forethought and composure, you can have the flat load work like other loads. The only thing is you do need someone to clear the bed, but since we often break the line when the hose bed is more than enough for the lay it isn't a big deal.

  15. #15
    Forum Member FyredUp's Avatar
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    nameless,

    The one change we made was to add ears. Ears were put on the second layer and at the 100 foot mark. This allows the firefighter(s) that stretch this line to load the top 100 on their shoulder or drag it, AND to take the lower loops to pull the remaining hose from the bed as they advance. We practice, practice, practice, and then practice some more, 1 and 2 firefighter hose stretches and this load works very well for us.
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  16. #16
    Forum Member TillamanTrk1's Avatar
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    we use flat loads with two (2) sets of ears. One set being in the middle and one being on the bottom. That way tailboard can come grab the middle ears and run and stretch and the driver can grab the rest so its not all laying in a big pile at the pump panel. Some drivers prefer the tailbaord grab the whole preconnect and stretch it out himself and some drivers like to do it there selves.. Its whatever the driver or officer wants.
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  17. #17
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    Thanks everyone for the feed back. Looks like the flat load is one of the most poplular. That is what we have been curently using with ears. I think we will stick with this for now and continue to add more training on advancing it, in the past we have been way to lack on that part of it.

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