1. #1
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    Default Address Violence?

    In the shadow of the Connecticut shooting, is there any department out there that is active in the prevention of violence? Should this be another area we take an active role in?

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    no -------------
    ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by slackjawedyokel View Post
    no -------------
    In addition, nope.
    "Be polite, be professional, but have a plan to kill everybody you meet.
    --General James Mattis, USMC


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    Depends on how you define an active role.

    Certainly if a fire department runs EMS, including non-transport first response, they should be active in the area of injury prevention, either by themselves if they handle transport or in cooperation with the transporting agency if they only run first response, much like we are responsible for fire prevention and education.

    And certainly the area of injury prevention should involve gun safety and gun injury prevention. Depending on your area, it may be, in some situations, quite logical that the fire department is tied into law enforcement in a gun volience program, as in the end, we are the agency that will end up transporting the victims.

    At this time I would not see either my combo or volunteer departments involved in such a program as gun voleince does not pose a signficant issue in either community, but certainly in some places I could see a very logical tie in with law enforcement in a cooperative community-directed educational, prevention and/or facility planning response program.
    Train to fight the fires you fight.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EastKyFF View Post
    In addition, nope.
    So as firefighters; respected, admired, and trusted members of the community who have instant respect and ability to accomplish any good in their community without question, we sit here and watch this tragedy unfild and feel no moral, ethical, or professional responsibility/desire to do what we can to address this threat to (in this case and increasing cases) children? We'd rather respond after the shots are fired and wounds inflicted.

    Curious.... why?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel Byrne View Post
    So as firefighters; respected, admired, and trusted members of the community who have instant respect and ability to accomplish any good in their community without question, we sit here and watch this tragedy unfild and feel no moral, ethical, or professional responsibility/desire to do what we can to address this threat to (in this case and increasing cases) children? We'd rather respond after the shots are fired and wounds inflicted.

    Curious.... why?

    What is our role? What are our qualifications? What do we know about behavior of shooters? What do we have to offer on the topic above and beyond what law enforcement has? Should the police be doing fire prevention? Should we be doing drug abuse prevention?

    Not everything we respond to is something we are qualified to help prevent. School administrators work with law enforcement to prepare for this type of thing.

    Let's allow the police to work in their areas of expertise and we'll work in ours.
    "Be polite, be professional, but have a plan to kill everybody you meet.
    --General James Mattis, USMC


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    But that's where you're thinking very one dimensional. As firefighters we are trusted and respected in our community. Just about everyone admires firefighters. It's not about "education" it's about getting involved as a fire department is what is going on with your community. Mentor programs, going to neighborhood watch meetings to show support, school safety teams/committees, having/hosting community events. The NFPA created Risk Watch because they saw the need for the fire service to branch out beyond just fire safety. It's about getting out in your community and getting involved - having simple conversations.

    And I do disagree with you. If we respond to it - we should be educated on it - and we should be able to provide SOME prevention/education information.

    Again as firefighters we have a significant value in our community that goes to waste if we remain in a responsive mode. We can't solve the community violence problem be we can be a PART of the solution and a very important part to any community involvement. Firefighters CAN and DO make a difference.

    A simple conversation at a community event can change the world....

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    Being present and supportive of other agencies on this issue is fine. I would certainly be in favor of lending our credibility & profile to help increase the impact of the work done by others. I just don't see us taking the lead role in something that is being handled very well by law enforcement. It's not the type of issue people expect to hear from the fire department about, not as a primary source.
    "Be polite, be professional, but have a plan to kill everybody you meet.
    --General James Mattis, USMC


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    Completely agree. This is primarily a law enforcement issue. I do believe the fire service should be familar with educational informtion, where someone can go for help, a show or support in community groups, etc. and assist other agencies. It takes a community to addresses issues like these and the fire service is the heart (or I believe) of every community.

    The power we have as firefighters to influence others is remarkable. We can't waste that when people are being killed. We can't prevent everything, but just like a trapped victim, if their is a life to be saved we have to try.

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    The old sayings hold true meaning - tell me what "too many irons in the fire" means to you .
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    The fact is gun volience is OUR problem, as we in the end, are the ones that respond to it, much like household injury prevention,water and ice safety, carseat use, drunk driving, seat belt usage and other injury-related issues are the fire service's problems if we provide any type of EMS response.

    In addition, gun volience poses a significant safety hazard to our members, so just from that perspective, we need to be involved in it's prevention.

    If there is a significant problem in the community, we need to be involved, not in a support or secondary role, but in a cooprative partnership with law enforcement and EMS to deliver education and prevention. Much of the expertise does lie with the police, but certainly our prevention personnel can be (and IMO should be) trained to deliver or assist in delivering messages through a variety of avenues.

    In addition, we need to be heaviliy involved with response planning as we will have to treat the victims. This includes the development of protocols that disctates when we can access patients, where they will be treated and what type of security will be provided for fire/EMS personnel.
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    How bout "jack of all trades -master of none " ?
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    Quote Originally Posted by slackjawedyokel View Post
    How bout "jack of all trades -master of none " ?
    Fully understand that it adds to our plate and for some agencies can be a challenge.

    But so is teaching water safety, injury prevention, home fire safety, home injury safety and in my case I also work with LE on seatbelt and vehicle safety programs ........ Which are all areas that as a fire department running either EMS first response or first response and transport we have prevention responsibilities for. Around herea couple of the larger career FDs also do carseat inspections (which requires an 80 hour class plus a 40 hour refresher every two years).

    And IMO that also includes working with LE on volience awareness and prevention education programs as we certainly have response and in many cases transport responsibility.
    Train to fight the fires you fight.

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    Quote Originally Posted by slackjawedyokel View Post
    How bout "jack of all trades -master of none " ?
    Addressing this issue is not about detracting from any of our current operational requirements and taking on another responsibility. News flash. ANY tragedy in our community is our responsibility. But we keep thinking one dimensional. This is about using resources (people) who are already in place and making the most of our time and getting involved. It's about making the most of the trust and admiration we have been given.

    It's about taking the engine company to the local community gathering, neighborhood watch meetings, public outreach by other agencies.... how is that detracting from anything? How is this overloading our plate?

    The fire service needs to start adapting to what the public today needs and values and stop hanging our hat on our history. If we can make a difference, and we can, we need to get up and get involved. That is what the fire service is supposed to be about.

    When have we ever sat there when people are in need and are threatened and said "that's not our job."

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