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Thread: Scene Lighting

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    Lightbulb Scene Lighting

    I am looking for information on what make, model, scene lighting, voltage 12v, 120v, 240v, etc. Led, or other type your department is using on newer fire apparatus, and which do you like the most !

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    Heavy Rescue and Aerial (quint) both have PTO driven hydraulic 110/220 volt generators. On the rescue, the 110 Volt brow light is a must on vehicle accident for immediate scene lighting. The light tower on this unit takes about 2 minute to fully deploy from a stowed (Folded & telescoped) position. The light tower is a real safety factor when working on any type of scene. Aerial has quartz lighting on all 4 sides, with the left & right on hand raised posts. This unit uses a hydraulic control that adjusts the fluid flow to maintain 60 cycles at any engine RPM and electrical load. We have not had an opportunity to demo or to purchase LED type lighting, but are verry happy with the present quartz 110 / 220 volt systems.

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    Last year we got both FRC and Weldon (Akron Brass) come to (different) meetings of our county engineers' association to demo their LED offerings. Both were impressive. The reps were very knowledgeable. Since LEDs can be powered with either 12 volts or 120 volts they both explained how best to power each, and the pros and cons of each way of doing it. I understand that Whelen will also put on such a demo, too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Woodbridge View Post
    I am looking for information on what make, model, scene lighting, voltage 12v, 120v, 240v, etc. Led, or other type your department is using on newer fire apparatus, and which do you like the most !
    We have a new Rescue Pumper on order. We went with both LED and 120/240Vac scene lights.

    We based the decision off what we saw on a demo with the "new" LED scene lights with an additional 120/240V Light tower.

    We took the demo out to a dark place in town and turned on the lights. The LED's were instant on and gave better light than our older trucks. Then we turned on the light tower.... whole different ballgame with the light tower.

    Remember to look at the ratings of the light in lumens. Lumen is of the total "amount" of visible light emitted by a source. Google it.....

    If you look up your current lights for their ratings then compare to the new lights you can "guess-ti-mate" if they will be better by the Lumen rating.

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    Last engine we got has 12v LED's and 120v lights off a PTO generator. Oh ya, and a light tower.

    12v is nice for minor stuff, 120's for the rest. We have 2 brow lights and 2 120v lights on each side of the engine. Also have removable 120's that are plugged in and can be removed to remote locations as needed....all work off switches in cab and pump panel.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

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    Lightbulb

    Any departments have recess body scene lighting on there pumpers ? If so what make & model are on your apparatus !

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    At work, we use all 12V LED floodlight, including the light tower. The front brow light, two bottom-raise pole mount lights, and Will-Burt light tower use Whelen Pioneer lightheads. We saved tens of thousands of dollars by eliminating the generators and going all 12V LED, and didn't sacrifice our available light at all.

    We have a Rosenbauer (General) Commander on order for my VFD. We're using a 12V FRC Spectra 20k lumen brow light, and 12V FRC Spectra 15k recessed floodlighting for the sides and rear. We'll also be purchasing a couple of 120V folding Spectras to hook to the cord reel/junction box that will be on on board.

    We just replaced the 500W tripod lights on our heavy rescue with FRC Spectras (after doing research), and the available light from the LED head is staggering. It's like comparing a candle to a 4 D-Cell MagLight.
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    I spec and bid apparatus for a dealer. Our recommendations for scene lighting depend on whether the truck will include a generator or not. If you are installing a hydraulic generator, a combination of 12V LED and 120V quartz lighting makes the most sense. If you are not installing a generator, 12V LED work well, but you have to be cafeful with your amp draw. The larger LED scenelights draw up to 18 amps each, (2) 12V brow lights, (2) scenelights each side, and (2) rear lights, with your other 12V truck loads, can easily overload a 320 amp alternator at fast idle.

    We recommend a single 12V brow light such as the FRC Q20 lighthead (20,000 lumens) or Whelen PFP2 lighthead (14,000 lumens) along with a pair of FRC900-Q65 lampheads on the rear body bulkheads. The 12V brow light is instant on, doesn't require generator power and immediatly lights the forward scene. The 12V rear light provides good scene lighting, and can be wired into the backup light circuit to automatically give you great light for backing.

    For the side lighting, whether you are doing pole lighting or recessed, we still recommend 120V 750w quartz lighting, such as the FRC Focus S75 lamphead. They give 19,600 lumens each, are substantially less expensive than the LED, and overall cost of ownership is still less than LED, even of you have to replace a bulb per year. With 12V/120V relay switching, you can still activate these lights while in motion from a hydraulic generator, depending upon how your generator activation is wired.

    If you are not installing a generator, the 12V LED scenelights work fine, but you should limit the side scenelights to one each side of the apparatus to avoid amp draw issues.
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    Quote Originally Posted by retofdac View Post
    I spec and bid apparatus for a dealer. Our recommendations for scene lighting depend on whether the truck will include a generator or not. If you are installing a hydraulic generator, a combination of 12V LED and 120V quartz lighting makes the most sense. If you are not installing a generator, 12V LED work well, but you have to be cafeful with your amp draw. The larger LED scenelights draw up to 18 amps each, (2) 12V brow lights, (2) scenelights each side, and (2) rear lights, with your other 12V truck loads, can easily overload a 320 amp alternator at fast idle.

    We recommend a single 12V brow light such as the FRC Q20 lighthead (20,000 lumens) or Whelen PFP2 lighthead (14,000 lumens) along with a pair of FRC900-Q65 lampheads on the rear body bulkheads. The 12V brow light is instant on, doesn't require generator power and immediatly lights the forward scene. The 12V rear light provides good scene lighting, and can be wired into the backup light circuit to automatically give you great light for backing.

    For the side lighting, whether you are doing pole lighting or recessed, we still recommend 120V 750w quartz lighting, such as the FRC Focus S75 lamphead. They give 19,600 lumens each, are substantially less expensive than the LED, and overall cost of ownership is still less than LED, even of you have to replace a bulb per year. With 12V/120V relay switching, you can still activate these lights while in motion from a hydraulic generator, depending upon how your generator activation is wired.

    If you are not installing a generator, the 12V LED scenelights work fine, but you should limit the side scenelights to one each side of the apparatus to avoid amp draw issues.
    The apparatus is wired for 120V & 240V at the rear,and has a PTO generator, your information is very helpfull !we are looking to go from Quartz over to LED. for better lighting.

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