1. #1
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    Default Vehicle Fire Training

    I am looking for some ideas or thoughts on using old wrecked cars for live fire training. We have access to some vehicles we could use. My question concerns prep of the car before using and what works best for fuel. I know the obvious would be to remove the fuel tank. What about the engine compartment, pull the engine to make more room for fuel such as old wood pellets or straw or both? Any feedback would be appreciated.

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    I'd use a fullsize 70's vintage vehicle. No airbags, most likely no struts, no lift cylinders, not as much plastic, and heavy gage steel that will survive fire longer. You're going to pretty much have to strip the car down to the body and axles, everthing plastic or rubber will have to go. Engine and tranny need to go. You can cover openings for headlights, the grill and such with sheet metal. You'll have to pull all the wiring too, and don't forget the oil in the differential.

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    To be NFPA and OSHA safe....use a plain simple steel frame with just about everything else removed.

    To be a little bit realistic....remove what you listed and use hay.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

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    How about instead of fire

    Turn them over or on too of the other and practice ems scenarios and stabilization and rescue tool practice.

    Not sure what you would get from hay in the frame only of a car

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    The Massachusetts Fire Academy uses a propane fueled car fire prop that is 100% metal. There are grates in the engine, passenger and truck compartments to hold that straw that is used to generate smoke. There is a person who ignites the straw, then the propane is turned on at the control panel from an air actuated control valve for each compartment. Sometimes we will get magnesium shavings to mix in the straw. Once the fire in a compartment is knocked down, the valve for that compartment is closed, shutting off the supply of gas.
    ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
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    thanks to all that replied. Looks like I need to get my hands on an old car, should be plenty of them sitting around the groves of N.W. Iowa. I like the idea of the propane setup, we have a local department that made one up.

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    Check the tow lots and wrecking yard

    The one in our city brings them to us and hauls them away

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    I don't really see where this is worth the time/energy/money involved. By the time you get the car ready for a burn, it's not really a car anymore. Any fire you light will not be a "car fire". It would be a hay or wood or propane fire in something that resembles a car.
    Instead of a real fire in a fake car, how about a fake fire in a real car?
    Or just do an extrication drill as was mentioned above.
    Last edited by captnjak; 05-16-2013 at 09:41 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by captnjak View Post
    I don't really see where this is worth the time/energy/money involved. By the time you get the car ready for a burn, it's not really a car anymore. Any fire you light will not be a "car fire". It would be a hay or wood or propane fire in something that resembles a car.
    Instead of a real fire in a fake car, how about a fake fire in a real car?
    Or just do an extrication drill as was mentioned above.
    Well Cap, no matter what the fire is made of, straw, propane, a fire pan like for extinguishers, the idea is to practice the proper sequence of events for an actual car fire. I can tell you honestly we use a 1965 Bonneville at the tech college for our car fire practice. Many times we do not use fire at all. We still practice the advance at a 45 to the front, using the hose stream to cool the bumper and the wheel well area, and to extinguish any visible fire. We will pop the hood and prop it with the Halligan and finish extinguishment. Of course there is no latch any longer but we talk about various methods for opening the hood and for darkening the fire while it is being fully opened. Things like burying the Halligan in the corner of the hood and folding the edge back, using the K-12 to V cut around the latch, and using the porta power to pop the hood. My favorite being the K-12 because the hood is usually junk anyways with a rip roaring engine fire.

    To me this is a skill worth investing the time, and money in.
    Last edited by FyredUp; 05-17-2013 at 12:12 AM.
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    Didn't mean to indicate that car fires are not worth drilling on. What you describe are the types of things that I meant by a "fake fire in a real car".

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    Quote Originally Posted by captnjak View Post
    Didn't mean to indicate that car fires are not worth drilling on. What you describe are the types of things that I meant by a "fake fire in a real car".
    So is a fire of pallets and straw in a burn tower fake fire? Even though it can and has injured firefighters?
    Crazy, but that's how it goes
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    Ah, the good old days....when you could burn pallets and straw! How I miss them...
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bones42 View Post
    Ah, the good old days....when you could burn pallets and straw! How I miss them...
    Still can here and in fact our new facility is being planned with burning class A materials in mind!
    Crazy, but that's how it goes
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    It would be "fake" for a car fire scenario with everything but the body and frame removed. It would also be a poor representation of an actual car fire.

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