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Thread: New rescue truck

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    Default New rescue truck

    My VFD is looking at replacing our rescue truck, which now carries all of our hydraulic tools, cribbing, cascade sytem, RIC team equipment, etc, with no water or pump. We're thinking of going to a combo rescue/pumper. Would like to here any pro's or con's either way. Thanks in advance.

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    Rescue engines can work well depending on your situation, but like any dual-purpose apparatus, you will probably have to give up some equipment that you would normally want on your rescue or on your engine. You might not have room for all of the engine equipment and all of the rescue equipment.

    When we purchased our last heavy rescue, we had a pump and small tank added, just to allow us to use it as a safety line without running an engine along with the squad. It doesn't meet standards for an engine because it doesn't have enough discharges or carry enough hose. This setup works well for us.

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    We have a rescue engine. 1 large compartment has vehicle equipment. Holmatro spreader, cutter, ram, hand pumped spreader, 2 crates of cribbing and 2 step chocks. Air bags and struts could be in there, but we put a large speedy dry hopper in there and put backs/struts in next compartment over. Probably could not do a truck accident, but no problems with cars. Of course, in a heavier truck accident area...you'd need more cribbing than what we carry.

    We have cascade system at building, not on truck. For us....no where near enough need to have a cascade system at the scene to justify the space on a truck.

    Engine also has multiple flood lights and a light tower.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

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    We did the opposite. We had a mini-pumper that was positively overloaded and decided to go to a rescue-only vehicle.

    Our only concern with that was that we would not have any firefighting capability on the first-out truck if we had an MVC with fire. However, in my 17 years with this department we have worked a grand total of three of those--none with patients inside--so we felt it was a reasonable risk.

    We also have rescue tools on all three engines, so if the initial call indicates fire we'll roll an engine first and still have some extrication capabilities if it takes a minute for the rescue to roll. Obviously we have a couple of big extinguishers on the rescue in case fire starts after the call.

    We've been under the new setup for about six years now and it has yet to bite us.

    Here are our before n' after rigs:

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    Our rescue-engine carries a compliment similar to what you note, plus a full compliment of engine equipment. We have ours set up with the drivers side being the "rescue side" and the officer's side as the "fire side".

    For "Rescue" we carry a full compliment of air bags, res-Q-jacks, two Holmatro portable power packs, spreader, cutter, ram, 4 Core hoses, air tool kit, sawzall, air monitoring equipment, water/ice rescue gear, rope rescue equipment, wood and composite cribbing, speedy-dri, a complinet of jacks and come-alongs, and vairous small tool kits.

    For the Engine Co. role, the truck carries 1300 ft. of 5" LDH, 600 ft. 2.5", (3) 200 foot 1.75" preconnects, a 300ft. 3" line with Blitz gun, fitting and adapters, 24 ft. extension ladder, 14 ft. roof, 10 ft. folding, 6 ft. hooks, Irons, chainsaw, K12, extra fuel for saws, RIT kit, spare SCBA bottles, fire extinguishers, electric Blower, portable deluge set, TIC, 5 SCBA, and various other standard firefighting tools.

    The truck replaced two aging apparatus, a smaller light rescue truck and an engine. This allowed us to send only one truck to calls where extrication was required, as previously the light rescue stayed back unless specifically needed, now this engine is first due for all calls in our first due and for mutual aid extrication runs. The downside is that you tie up two sets of rescources at any single incident, so depending on your run volume and the time for "plan B" to be implemented might preclude this concept. Of course the truck may have been a little smaller in OAL if it had been just one or the other, but in the end would have required two peices vs. the one.

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    EastKY, who made the truck for you. We are looking for something very similar and looking into who and for how much.

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    Quote Originally Posted by HuntPA View Post
    EastKY, who made the truck for you. We are looking for something very similar and looking into who and for how much.
    The truck was built by Fouts Bros. in Georgia. That is a 2008 F-550 4x4 chassis. The body is 9' long and has an 8' roll-out tray in the back end. We also have an inverter and a winch.

    The diamond plate thing on top was built by a local fabricator and added on after delivery. It has two hinged doors at the rear and we store our backboards, stokes, brooms, shovels, and a ladder up top.

    We ordered the truck in late 2006 and paid $64,800.

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    First off please give a run down of current apparatus and the primary call runs you handle now. If you spec a "Rescue Pumper" be-warned it will have to be fully setup to IS0-NFPA Standards. Another thought is how long of life do want this rig to have. As time goes on be sure to have reserve load carrying capacity as equipment and or mission specifications will change.
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    Do you need another pumper, or would a rescue with a small pump and tank it suffice to meet your needs? The primary use of the vehicle should help lead you to your decision.
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    Quote Originally Posted by EastKyFF View Post
    The truck was built by Fouts Bros. in Georgia. That is a 2008 F-550 4x4 chassis. The body is 9' long and has an 8' roll-out tray in the back end. We also have an inverter and a winch.

    The diamond plate thing on top was built by a local fabricator and added on after delivery. It has two hinged doors at the rear and we store our backboards, stokes, brooms, shovels, and a ladder up top.

    We ordered the truck in late 2006 and paid $64,800.

    Attachment 22914
    That's a very nice rig EastKY! I've seen that roll out tray used to good effect in a neighboring dept. They use a heavy duty pick up truck as a duty officer's vehicle/squad. It's got a cap on the bed, and a roll out tray within holding some extrication equipment, ems bag etc. Does the job well for the majority of incidents. For the big, complicated ones, they run a heavy rescue, and can call on more of the same from several neighbors.

    and RFD- are you sure we aren't in the same fire dept? Up until the last paragraph, what you described sounded almost exactly like our new rescue engine. Great minds and all, right.

    As far as losing two resources to handle one call, in addition to this unit we run an attack pumper, with 1750/1000, and a 100' quint w/ 1500/300. The rescue engine is second or third due, depending upon where the call is. ( Village or commercial/ high risk, quint is first in, out in town, the engine goes first.) The rescue engine would primarily be a supply pumper at most fires, and we have auto aid dispatched to those ALONG with us, anyhow. We have plenty of pumpers to handle our call volume- it's manpower that runs short...
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    The first thing you need to specify is what your budget is. That will be your ultimate limit. Then determine your needs. Do you NEED another pumper?? How much gear do you need to carry? There are a million different ways to configure a rescue. Take your time and take a look at a lot of them.
    Another option instead of a pump is a Tri-Max CAFS extinguisher. We spec'd one because sometimes it's possible that we wouldn't have manpower to bring the engine on an auto accident. Ours is a 30 gallon model that will make up to 600 gallons of foam. The make them with tanks up to 200 gallons.

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