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Thread: The Pig

  1. #1
    Forum Member Snarff's Avatar
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    Default The Pig

    Our department recently purchased two PIG's http://www.lonestaraxellc.com/ and started marrying them to our Irons on our first due engine "wagon" and our ladder truck. So far everyone loves it. The only complaint we have gotten about it is from our paid staff they state its "too heavy". Other than that we have used it from forcible entry to ventilation and pretty much anything you you can think of.

    We have also burned our handles with this method for grip http://firstduetackle.com/2012/06/01...e-grip-method/ We have done this with every fiberglass axe handle in the station about a year ago. This in our experience is the best method for grip on an axe handle we have found and holds up very well.

    They are a bit pricey just wondering if anyone else has used this tool and what your experiences are with it. Also what other methods do you guys use for grips on your tools?


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    Forum Member FyredUp's Avatar
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    Just curious as to what is the advantage over an 8 pound flathead axe, or an 8 pound splitting maul?
    Crazy, but that's how it goes
    Millions of people living as foes
    Maybe it's not too late
    To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

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    Forum Member Bones42's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FyredUp View Post
    Just curious as to what is the advantage over an 8 pound flathead axe, or an 8 pound splitting maul?
    The cool name.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

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    MembersZone Subscriber voyager9's Avatar
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    Reminded me of this:
    So you call this your free country
    Tell me why it costs so much to live
    -3dd

  5. #5
    Forum Member Snarff's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FyredUp View Post
    Just curious as to what is the advantage over an 8 pound flathead axe, or an 8 pound splitting maul?
    As for working with the halligan not really any different I mean anything with a striking end will work with a halligan.

    For us it really sets itself apart from axes during roof ventilation, the problem we have found with our guys is they tend to bury the axe in the roof and end up having to rock it back and forth to get it out. With this its the same concept as using a flathead to bust through the roof but with the pick it allows a foothold or a starting hole for the Striking end.

    One disadvantage we thought of was lossing the abilty to use the blade of a flathead to gap and hold a door till you get the halligan in there. But we found the pick of the pig with its beveled end will do the same.

    and yes it also has a cool name lol

  6. #6
    Forum Member FyredUp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snarff View Post
    As for working with the halligan not really any different I mean anything with a striking end will work with a halligan.

    For us it really sets itself apart from axes during roof ventilation, the problem we have found with our guys is they tend to bury the axe in the roof and end up having to rock it back and forth to get it out. With this its the same concept as using a flathead to bust through the roof but with the pick it allows a foothold or a starting hole for the Striking end.

    One disadvantage we thought of was lossing the abilty to use the blade of a flathead to gap and hold a door till you get the halligan in there. But we found the pick of the pig with its beveled end will do the same.

    and yes it also has a cool name lol
    I must be retro new/old school because for venting a roof I will take the carbide tipped chain saw over an axe, a maul, or even the new fangled Pig anyday.

    We just purchased 2 - 8 pound splitting mauls to carry with the irons for our RIT crew. They cost $31 a piece, an 8 pound flat head costs around $100, an 8 pound Denver Tool costs around $200, the Pig costs $189.99. I guess I would need to try one to see if it is worth the extra coin over a maul or flat head axe.
    Crazy, but that's how it goes
    Millions of people living as foes
    Maybe it's not too late
    To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by FyredUp View Post
    Just curious as to what is the advantage over an 8 pound flathead axe, or an 8 pound splitting maul?
    Everything is bigger in texas

  8. #8
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    Default

    I bought one out of curiosity and as a test-eval method for my department. I carry it as a personal tool as opposed to having it on an apparatus all the time. The guys on my department know if I'm not around, they're free to grab it and take it on calls. All in the sake of getting feedback for future purposes.

    I bought it with two thoughts in mind: forcible entry and ventilation operations. Beyond the PIG, I carry a Newark 44 bar on alarms. Like the PIG, I bought the 44 myself. The combo is something that took getting used to but after several alarms, along with drills, I've gotten accustomed to them both.

    As for the 8 pound vs 6 pound debate, I'll stick with personal/department preference. My agency is switching out all 6#'s for 8# flatheads. Those who like the 6#, its what works for them. For us, we have gotten used to the 8's. The PIG is only offered in 8# variant, so that didn't matter to me.

    I like the PIG for doing the crush/smash technique of roof ventilation but as others noted, give me a saw anyday of the week first. But it's nice having a back-up plan readily available.

    For forcible entry, I have found its easier to use wedges rather than the pick end of the PIG. So its main purpose for FE with me is for when I need to drive in the adz or to smash off a lock.

    I went with the 32 inch black fiberglass handle. To deal with the grip, my preferred method is to wrap the handle with 1/8" rope in a cork-screw configuration then cover it with electrician's friction tape. I stay about 8 inches back from the head and stop about 2 inches from the end of the handle.

  9. #9
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    I guess there would be a slight advantage for roof cutting. Otherwise I don't see a grear reason to get it. (weight and price)

    But we use power saws to cut roofs.

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