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Thread: Cover For A Monitor Nozzle?

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    Default Cover For A Monitor Nozzle?

    Has anyone ever seen a cover for the nozzle on a monitor? Had a discussion about this today. We got a new mid mount platform and mounted a ground based monitor combination nozzle on the turntable. One of the guys saw it and said we should get a cover to keep debris out of it. Someone also commented that due to the location of the nozzles on the platform they would pick up road grime. Never gave this any thought.

    Anyone ever had a problem with debris in them? Does anyone cover theirs and if so with what? Best idea I've had so far is with a rope bag with a draw string.

    Just thought I'd ask.

    Thanks,
    Walt
    Train like you want to fight.
    www.kvfd.net

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    Quote Originally Posted by FFWALT View Post
    Has anyone ever seen a cover for the nozzle on a monitor? Had a discussion about this today. We got a new mid mount platform and mounted a ground based monitor combination nozzle on the turntable. One of the guys saw it and said we should get a cover to keep debris out of it. Someone also commented that due to the location of the nozzles on the platform they would pick up road grime. Never gave this any thought.

    Anyone ever had a problem with debris in them? Does anyone cover theirs and if so with what? Best idea I've had so far is with a rope bag with a draw string.

    Just thought I'd ask.

    Thanks,
    Walt
    I was instructing at a volly FD that had a Blitzfire on the back of the engine with a cover over the automatic nozzle it had on it. Not sure if the cover was to protect the nozzle or hide the shame of having it!!

    Anyways the cover was made out of some material kind of like cordura and just like you said had a drawstring to keep it secured.
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    We had the same issues a while back. We switched to all smoothbores on the guns and leave the fog tips in the compartments. No dust/dirt/grime issues and harder hitting when you need it most.

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    Why would you mount a ground based monitor combination nozzle on the turntable of an aerial?

    Mount it down lower and in a compartment if possible. If that isn't good, find a place but get of off the turntable. It is in the way there.
    Stay Safe and Well Out There....

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    With the time it will take to set up a ground based master stream, leaving the automatic nozzle in a compartment and keeping a straight tip on the device will not add any appreciable time to change them out if needed. The time you save not having to clean or service the automatic nozzle will be well used on something else.

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    Is it mounted there as in just a place to carry it, or mounted there as in lay lines to it and operate as deck gun?

    If its just mounted to carry it, throw it in the dunnage area under the ladder.

    As far as picking up road grime and debris - on the tailboard, yes; on the turn table, no.
    RK
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    We have been running dual 2 1/2" preconnects off the rear of our engines since 1974. With both Akron Turbo-Jets and Task Force nozzles, there is a lot of dust generated on back roads. Our solution has been to use a baggie or other plastic bag over the nozzle and secure it with a rubber band. The bag blows off or splits when the line is charged, so there is no delay in removing the covering.

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    What's a combination nozzle?
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    Combination Nozzle - A nozzle that can be set to straight stream or fog by the nozzleman. As opposed to a solid stream or "Fixed Pattern" fog like a "Navy Nozzle" or "Applicator" nozzle designed in the early 1940 for ship-board fires in refined fuels.
    Mystery Nozzle - One that could be adjusted from off - to fog - to straight stream, but the flow (gpm) varied with the pattern. Then we got the "Constant Gallonage" design where the baffle opening was always the same with a 1/4 turn ball valve on the bail.
    Adjustable Gallonage nozzle (Akron Turbo-Jet & Elkhart) with an adjustable ring to set the baffle opening, but the nozzleman had to tell the pump operator what setting he was using. (But NEVER did)
    Finally TFT's "Constant Pressure Nozzle" with the baffle opening set by the base pressure of the nozzle and a specialized piston (turbulance reduced) valve that allows the nozzleman to adjust the flow, but not the reach. (always about 100 psi at the baffle - or other fixed pressure)
    Hope this helps with the question.
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    Ohhhhhhhhh I see.......You mean those things we have in the backs of our compartments that are taking up valuable space, that we never use because the smoothbore nozzles beat the schit out of them every day of the week and twice on Sundays........I understand now.
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    Thank you for your input. It looks like the baggie with the rubber band may be our best option.

    Unless you are providing protection to an exposure such as a fuel tank I personally think large caliber streams should only have solid bore nozzles. With that said, both types of nozzles are a tool and we all know that every tool has its strengths and weaknesses. Our department is relatively new to solid bore nozzles (had nothing but combinations until about 10 years ago) and tradition is hard to break. Funny thing is, they have seen how well they can put out a fire but we still have a tendency to "default" back to our old ways. Just working on getting guys to think about what and why they are using each nozzle instead of just reacting. That way the best nozzle for the situation gets used instead of perhaps the less ideal one.

    Although we don't view them as such, technically our ladders are quints. As a result we don't have a dunnage areas to speak of. Under the ladder itself is either hose and/or ladders. We just got a SPH100 which has a lot of compartment space while our SP95 doesn't have the same amount. As a result we are evaluating where things are stored and working to get both ladders very similar to each other regarding how equipment is stored, mounted, etc. On our turntable, behind the pedestal is an empty area where the ground based monitor, base and nozzles fit so we mounted them there. This freed up one entire compartment on our SP95. The way the monitor is mounted the operation of the ladder is not impacted and it does not get in the way of operating on the ladder if we chose to do so.

    I admit that getting the monitor down for "the big one" may be less than ideal depending upon how the ladder is positioned. Both our ladders are platforms with two nozzles, one being an automatic capable of 1,250 gpm at 80 psi and the other a solid bore. Between the waterway flow meter and the in line pressure gauges at the nozzles we can ensure we are flowing 1,500 gpm plus from an elevated master stream. All of our engines all carry ground based monitors so the situation where we would have the available flow and the need for the monitor mounted on the turn table is not very likely going to occur. If it does, we will be able to get the monitor down and into service relatively easy.

    Just wanted to address some of the points you guys raised and explain how we operate.

    Thanks,
    Walt

    P.S. By the way, now that we got the SPH100 we have a 1987 E-One rear mount 80' stick that needs a home. I want to give all that poor lost beer a good home but the City has other ideas. If you or another department is interested let me know and we'll get you the info.
    Train like you want to fight.
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