Thread: Rescue engine

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    Default Rescue engine

    Okay let's try this again!

    Talk to me about your rescue engine, or squad type engine, and the storage options you have used. You know shelving, slide out trays, drawers, ladder racks, hard suction, or something else that you innovated or "borrowed" from somewhere else.

    Just to give you an idea of what we would be carrying for equipment: Full engine equipment, extrication equipment, some truck equipment to include a PPV fan, saws, and additional hooks and axes. Also we are looking at a minimum of 1000 gallons of water, if not 1500. The pump would be a 2000 gpm with Class A foam. More than likely if the plan continues the front bumper will be for a preconnected 2 inch handline and a 2 1/2 inch line with a blitzfire.

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    I hope you have a big firehouse! Add a few more things and you'll need a tandem axle.

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    Indeed we have a big firehouse and in fact some have wondered why we don't go with a 2000 or 2500 gallon tank for a heavy hit while the water supply is being established. Personally, I would like to stay with a single axle and a shorter vehicle.
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    Are you thinking of carrying a dump tank with this at all? How much hose are you putting in the hose bed? Any crosslays over the pump? Do you do much drafting? And what all are you carrying for extrication?

    We have an '07 Pierce Contender top mount, with a 1500gpm pump, 1000 gal. tank. and a 25 gal. class A, and a 35 gal. class B tanks. Ladder is carried through the tank, with high compartment sides on both sides We also carry 25 gals. of each class in buckets in the well and hose beds.
    We have a Genisis Mini Simo pump with a Combo tool, and a basic set of chocks, and cribbing. Also have a couple of saws, fan, hand tools and extinguishers, etc.

    If you are considering a bigger truck, our engine/tanker is also set up to carry our extrication tools off of the engine if it's ever out of service. (front right side) Probably the only thing we'd change is to put the ladder through the tank instead of the dump tank. There's a ton of room on this truck, and we also have a large cabinet in the back of the crew compartment.
    http://www.piercemfg.com/en/experien...er-Tanker.aspx

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    This is ours....

    Officer side rear compartment carries 2 crates of cribbing, 2 step chocks, Holmatro power unit, cutter, spreader, ram. Also has 100# speedy dry hopper, brooms, and shovel.

    Front bumper....2 1/2" piping to a gated wye with 100' 1 3/4" and 50" 1" line.

    Front suction, plus a 5" discharge on officer side pump panel.

    Took out a few of the sliding shelves for fixed shelving. Drivers pump panel compartment has vertical slide shelf for adapters and such.

    Light tower on top, 3 hard suction sleeves, 2 section 28' ground ladder, 14' roof ladder, 16' roof ladder, attic ladder and Little Giant. PPV fan also.

    Crosslays....2 x 200' 1 3/4", 1 x 200' 2 1/2". Rear hosebed has 1000' of 5", 400' of 2 1/2" dead lay, 200' of 2 1/2" preconnected with a Blitzfire.

    Also carries 2 generator lights, K saw, chain saw. And our RIT/FAST equipment.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

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    Quote Originally Posted by johnsb View Post
    Are you thinking of carrying a dump tank with this at all? How much hose are you putting in the hose bed? Any crosslays over the pump? Do you do much drafting? And what all are you carrying for extrication?

    No dump tank, 1000 feet of 5 inch, 500 plus feet of 2 1/2, I would expect some longer crosslays over the pump, what size I am unsure, but I would guess 1 3/4 or maybe 2 inch if some of the more radical of us have our way! Yes, we draft and since I have been a member the vast majority of structure fires have been in the rural and called for tender ops, hence the requirement for a rear suction and fron pre-connects. For extrication again, depending on who wins may consist of a cutter, combi tool, ram, power unit and some cribbing. It would not be the primary rig for extrication, the heavy rescue would be.

    We have an '07 Pierce Contender top mount, with a 1500gpm pump, 1000 gal. tank. and a 25 gal. class A, and a 35 gal. class B tanks. Ladder is carried through the tank, with high compartment sides on both sides We also carry 25 gals. of each class in buckets in the well and hose beds.

    My other POC FD has a 2005 HME rescue engine. It is a custom cab with seating for 6, 5 with scba. It has a 2000 gpm pump, 1020 gallon water tank, with 30 gallon foam tank. It has 2-200 foot 2 inch bumper well crosslays, and 2-300 foot 2 inch over the pump crosslays, and a pre-piped deck gun. The rear hosebed carries 1400 feet of 5 inch, has 2-400 foot beds of 3 inch, one as an appartment line that finishes with a gated wye with 100 feet of 2 inch, the other is just a male coupling out dead lay. We also tend to draft off the rear so we also carry our hard suction in the hose bed.


    We have a Genisis Mini Simo pump with a Combo tool, and a basic set of chocks, and cribbing. Also have a couple of saws, fan, hand tools and extinguishers, etc.

    My other POC FD carries a full sized spreader, cutter, combi-tool, ram with extension kit, power unit and 2-100 foot hydraulic hose reels. We carry step chocks and quite a bit of 4x4 and 4x6 cribbing. Also onboard is some truck equipment like an electric PPV fan, a Stihl roof vent chain saw, a Stihl Rotary saw, a corded sawzall, and a DeWalt 18 volt cordless tool kit, a set of irons, additional axes, a selection of hooks that includes various lengths of FDNY roof hooks, pike poles, Boston rakes, rubbish hooks, and a San Francisco pike. Extinguishers on board are a PW with foam, dry chem, and a CO2. For lighting we have an onboard 10kWgenerator and 5 1500 watt lights, 2-500 watt portable lights, and a 1000 watt Honda gen set with a 500 watt light. Ladders in the overhead rack include a 24 foot extension, 14 foot roof. 10 foot attic and a 6 foot step ladder.

    If you are considering a bigger truck, our engine/tanker is also set up to carry our extrication tools off of the engine if it's ever out of service. (front right side) Probably the only thing we'd change is to put the ladder through the tank instead of the dump tank. There's a ton of room on this truck, and we also have a large cabinet in the back of the crew compartment.

    We have an ems cabinet inside the cab on my other POC FD.

    http://www.piercemfg.com/en/experien...er-Tanker.aspx
    Your rig sounds very similar to what my other POC FD has. We have equipment mounted on roll out trays, roll out drop down trays, and vertical tool boards. Wedid a TON of research before we wrote specs and talked to salesmen. I have wondered if there were better ideas out there and hoped some here would enlighten me.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bones42 View Post
    This is ours....

    Officer side rear compartment carries 2 crates of cribbing, 2 step chocks, Holmatro power unit, cutter, spreader, ram. Also has 100# speedy dry hopper, brooms, and shovel.

    Front bumper....2 1/2" piping to a gated wye with 100' 1 3/4" and 50" 1" line.

    Front suction, plus a 5" discharge on officer side pump panel.

    Took out a few of the sliding shelves for fixed shelving. Drivers pump panel compartment has vertical slide shelf for adapters and such.

    Light tower on top, 3 hard suction sleeves, 2 section 28' ground ladder, 14' roof ladder, 16' roof ladder, attic ladder and Little Giant. PPV fan also.

    Crosslays....2 x 200' 1 3/4", 1 x 200' 2 1/2". Rear hosebed has 1000' of 5", 400' of 2 1/2" dead lay, 200' of 2 1/2" preconnected with a Blitzfire.

    Also carries 2 generator lights, K saw, chain saw. And our RIT/FAST equipment.
    Sounds similar to what my other POC FD has. The front crosslays we want on our rig will need 2 seperate discharges though.
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    One detail we found was that the roll-out tip down trays we have and saw ended up taking up nearly as much vertical height as they solved. For example, the ones we have on our Tower require an extra 7.5" of space above the shelf to facilitate the movement and front lip on the tray. When the tray is pulled out the leading edge is only about 1" below the original shelf height. Now this might be a significant benefit depending on what's on the tray, but at the height of ours, there ends up being almost no advantage. Maybe if these were no higher than chest height in the compartment it would be more beneficial, but at the time we thought they'd help utilize upper compartment space and we were flat out wrong and out a bunch of money (heavy weight trays are not cheap).

    Another thing we'd likely forgo are the swing out tool boards. It seems nothing we have is "light" so these tend to droop and require constant adjustment. Maybe for adapters and light fitting, but as for actual tools? Not again. Pull-out vertical tool boards? Yep, these work great.

    One space we didn't utilize well is the area behind the roll-up doors at the top of the rescue body compartments. This is total dead space that could have been used (one per side) to carry our suction hose.

    Lastly, at this point, we ended up with rescue compartments that are taller than can be efficiently utilized. Most of the top shelf areas are too high for all personnel and certainly are not great for anything heavy. Next time we'd look at lower overall height and utilizing the space above them another way or just lower the overall height of the truck. making the coffins deeper in our case would not be of much benefit as they're already deeper than the hose bed deck, making it difficult to remove things at the bottom of the coffins. If there was no hosebed deck I'm not sure how easy it'd be to maneuver up there to remove equipment.
    Last edited by RFDACM02; 10-14-2013 at 08:57 AM. Reason: keyboard caused misspelled words

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    Quote Originally Posted by RFDACM02 View Post
    One detail we found was that the roll-out tip down trays we have and saw ended up taking up nearly as much vertical height as they solved. For example, the ones we have on our Tower require an extra 7.5" of space above the shelf to facilitate the movement and front lip on the tray. When the tray is pulled out the leading edge is only about 1" below the original shelf height. Now this might be a significant benefit depending on what's on the tray, but at the height of ours, there ends up being almost no advantage. Maybe if these were no higher than chest height in the compartment it would be more beneficial, but at the time we thought they'd help utilize upper compartment space and we were flat out wrong and out a bunch of money (heavy weight trays are not cheap).

    Another thing we'd likely forgo are the swing out tool boards. It seems nothing we have is "light" so these tend to droop and require constant adjustment. Maybe for adapters and light fitting, but as for actual tools? Not again. Pull-out vertical tool boards? Yep, these work great.

    One space we didn't utilize well is the area behind the roll-up doors at the top of the rescue body compartments. This is total dead space that could have been used (one per side) to carry our suction hose.

    Lastly, at this point, we ended up with rescue compartments that are taller than can be efficiently utilized. Most of the top shelf areas are too high for all personnel and certainly are not great for anything heavy. Next time we'd look at lower overall height and utilizing the space above them another way or just lower the overall height of the truck. making the coffins deeper in our case would not be of much benefit as they're already deeper than the hose bed deck, making it difficult to remove things at the bottom of the coffins. If there was no hosebed deck I'm not sure how easy it'd be to maneuver up there to remove equipment.
    I tend to agree with you on the upper roll out drop downs to an extent. I am not sure though what would be a better idea other than a pull out step for firefighters to stand on to reach stuff on the top shelf. I 100% agree with you on the swing out tool boards. I see them as a poorly thought out gimmick by a manufacturer to try and utilize some dead space in a compartment. I like your idea of placing the hard suction in the dead space behid the roll up door. That is a space that is essentially useless.

    If I can be brutally honest about coffin compartments let me say this...unless there is a method in place for moving equipment, especially heavier equipment from the top of the rig to the ground and then back up I don't like them. My career FD kept the low pressure air bags and controllers up on top and those large bags were heavy. So when we moved them up or down we had to use webbing and hoist them up. Which to me always seemed an unsafe manuever. Perhaps a stowable crane like you see on some pick up beds?

    Thanks for you input and your honesty about what ypu like and don't like on your rig.
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    Okay, because I mentioned I liked the honesty of what RFDACM02 said about his rig here are somethings I would change on my #1 POC FDs rescue engine.

    1) I wouldn't waste the officer's side middle compartment by utilizing the entire compartment for an air bottle rack. Nt sure where I would put those 12 bottles but that just seems like such a waste of space to me.

    2) No tools on the overhead ladder rack. Right now we have 4 hooks up there and if you want them you have to drop the ladder rack or climb up on the hose bed to get them down.

    3) All crosslay preconnect beds would terminate with a 2 1/2 inch male connection to allow flexibility if future needs changed and we wanted to return to 2 1/2 inch hose for some reason.

    4) Relocation of the EMS cabinet in the cab. Right now it is inbetween the rear facing jumpseats and directly in front of the heat and air conditioning outlets for the rear compartment. While it still gets cool and warm, it certainly takes longer than necessary because of the obstruction..

    5) I would have had a "hidden" electric pump for the Hurst tools instead of having to fire up the gas unit when we needed tools. I would have kept the gas unit, possibly gotten a smaller one initially for remote use.

    6) Remote operated deluge gun. Eliminating climbing on top of the rig to operate it, OR mounted a ladder to make climbing up to operate out manual deluge gun safer and easier.

    7) L-shaped water tank to lower the hose bed height.

    8) Just for the coolness factor either a Roto-Ray or an 888 light front center cab.

    9) Replace the eQ2B with a REAL Q2B. Not that the eQ doesn't work and offer more options, again it is the coolness factor.

    10) A light tower. While the 1500 watt eyebrow light and the 4 corner body extenda lights work fine, being able to massively flood the scene with the light from a tower is hard to beat.
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    Quote Originally Posted by FyredUp View Post
    I tend to agree with you on the upper roll out drop downs to an extent. I am not sure though what would be a better idea other than a pull out step for firefighters to stand on to reach stuff on the top shelf.
    I've also thought about this idea and find it has some usefulness, but I wonder about how well it lasts, long term? Almost anything mounted at the bottom of the body tends to sustain a lot more road dirt, salt and winter chemicals (here anyway) all of which make moving parts, less operable. Also, with snow, ice, mud and freezing water (over spray/rain) I wonder about making people step up and down to retrieve heavier tools. We've done as much as we can to keep those heavier tools as low and easy to retrieve as possible. I'm not condemning the use of the steps, just questioning if they make sense in everyone's situation. In warmer climates I might be less skeptical.
    Quote Originally Posted by FyredUp View Post
    If I can be brutally honest about coffin compartments let me say this...unless there is a method in place for moving equipment, especially heavier equipment from the top of the rig to the ground and then back up I don't like them.
    Without a doubt you've summed up the issues with coffins. We really aren't overly happy with them, but couldn't make the truck longer to accommodate the equipment (that is used far less frequently) at street level. Bringing the con-space tripod down from up top is a bear and has a much higher chance of injury than we'd like, but alas, it's the only place it fits and in the last 4 years has not come down more than twice a year.

    Quote Originally Posted by FyredUp View Post
    Thanks for you input and your honesty about what you like and don't like on your rig.
    We're under no illusion that we could hit a home run everytime when designing apparatus once every 4 or 5 years. I don't expect everyone will have the same experiences, but if someone sees something they hadn't considered and can investigate it further, then maybe they'll find a better solution, in which case we'll learn from them learning from us.

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    We (at the volunteer house) have an engine on order. We did a bit of a hybrid design on it - the driver's side has full-height, full-depth compartments on it, where as the officer's side has full-height, split-depth compartments with a rear-access ladder tunnel for a 28' 2-section and 14' roof ladder. Extrication tools come out of the rear compartment.

    Although a 70" cab would have been really nice, we ended up doing a 60" cab to reduce the OAL and WB since the Waterous Eclipse CAFS system added about a foot to the vehicle.

    Some thoughts on what you've posted:

    Quote Originally Posted by FyredUp View Post
    1) I wouldn't waste the officer's side middle compartment by utilizing the entire compartment for an air bottle rack. Nt sure where I would put those 12 bottles but that just seems like such a waste of space to me.
    I completely agree. If you're using high-pressure cylinders, there should be enough room to put four of them in each of three wheel-well storage areas.

    2) No tools on the overhead ladder rack. Right now we have 4 hooks up there and if you want them you have to drop the ladder rack or climb up on the hose bed to get them down.
    Also agree. Put the hooks in through-the-compartment sleeve which you access from the rear of the rig.

    4) Relocation of the EMS cabinet in the cab. Right now it is inbetween the rear facing jumpseats and directly in front of the heat and air conditioning outlets for the rear compartment. While it still gets cool and warm, it certainly takes longer than necessary because of the obstruction.
    Two thoughts - use a roof-mounted HVAC system in place of a tunnel-mounted HVAC, or move the EMS compartment against the rear wall (we have both of these on our rigs).

    5) I would have had a "hidden" electric pump for the Hurst tools instead of having to fire up the gas unit when we needed tools. I would have kept the gas unit, possibly gotten a smaller one initially for remote use.
    Excellent idea. When we got our heavy rescue in 2000, we also remotely mounted the hydraulic rescue tool pump to give us additional room. The unfortunate side is that where we mounted it. It's very difficult to do the yearly maintenance or add fluid. Pump location will be given a lot more thought on our next one.

    7) L-shaped water tank to lower the hose bed height.
    Just remember what that's going to do to your front axle rating and handling, especially when you're talking about a 1000+ gallon water tank. Also with that kind of capacity, you're going to be extending your wheelbase to account for that much water. Finally, give a lot of though to how shallow (front to rear) the bed will be - that will translate to a much deeper (top to bottom) hosebed, which could potentially put the end of the hose higher than expected.

    10) A light tower. While the 1500 watt eyebrow light and the 4 corner body extenda lights work fine, being able to massively flood the scene with the light from a tower is hard to beat.
    I'd suggest the FRC Spectra LED floods for your new piece. 20k lumen for the front and 15k for the sides and rear. If you haven't had a chance to check them out, I think you'll be very impressed.

    We did a Will-Burt Profiler light tower on the engine we have on order. In order not to have anything on the vehicle higher than the cab roof, we put the tower on the driver's side body where the forward coffin compartment would have been (hence, the choice to use the narrow-profile Profiler model). It uses existing space only added a few bucks for engineering on the design.

    Keep us posted on what direction the project takes...
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    Quote Originally Posted by FyredUp View Post
    ...
    2) No tools on the overhead ladder rack. Right now we have 4 hooks up there and if you want them you have to drop the ladder rack or climb up on the hose bed to get them down.
    ...
    On our engine, the drivers side has a short door behind the cab door. Behind that door is open space that goes the width of the truck and is accessible from the tall door on the officer side. The bottom of that space on each side has a water can. Driver side has scba, officer side has 02 box. 4 hooks go in the space, under the bench seat void. 2 4' and 2 6' hooks. We rarely use the 12' hooks that are on the ladder rack. Guys can get off either side of the truck and grab a 4/6 hook and can and off they go.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

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    Quote Originally Posted by BoxAlarm187 View Post
    We (at the volunteer house) have an engine on order. We did a bit of a hybrid design on it - the driver's side has full-height, full-depth compartments on it, where as the officer's side has full-height, split-depth compartments with a rear-access ladder tunnel for a 28' 2-section and 14' roof ladder. Extrication tools come out of the rear compartment.

    Although a 70" cab would have been really nice, we ended up doing a 60" cab to reduce the OAL and WB since the Waterous Eclipse CAFS system added about a foot to the vehicle.

    Some thoughts on what you've posted:



    I completely agree. If you're using high-pressure cylinders, there should be enough room to put four of them in each of three wheel-well storage areas.


    Also agree. Put the hooks in through-the-compartment sleeve which you access from the rear of the rig.


    Two thoughts - use a roof-mounted HVAC system in place of a tunnel-mounted HVAC, or move the EMS compartment against the rear wall (we have both of these on our rigs).


    Excellent idea. When we got our heavy rescue in 2000, we also remotely mounted the hydraulic rescue tool pump to give us additional room. The unfortunate side is that where we mounted it. It's very difficult to do the yearly maintenance or add fluid. Pump location will be given a lot more thought on our next one.


    Just remember what that's going to do to your front axle rating and handling, especially when you're talking about a 1000+ gallon water tank. Also with that kind of capacity, you're going to be extending your wheelbase to account for that much water. Finally, give a lot of though to how shallow (front to rear) the bed will be - that will translate to a much deeper (top to bottom) hosebed, which could potentially put the end of the hose higher than expected.


    I'd suggest the FRC Spectra LED floods for your new piece. 20k lumen for the front and 15k for the sides and rear. If you haven't had a chance to check them out, I think you'll be very impressed.

    We did a Will-Burt Profiler light tower on the engine we have on order. In order not to have anything on the vehicle higher than the cab roof, we put the tower on the driver's side body where the forward coffin compartment would have been (hence, the choice to use the narrow-profile Profiler model). It uses existing space only added a few bucks for engineering on the design.

    Keep us posted on what direction the project takes...
    We have the FRC Spectra Led 12V lights on two of our apparatus, and they are top notch !

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    Quote Originally Posted by FyredUp View Post
    1) I wouldn't waste the officer's side middle compartment by utilizing the entire compartment for an air bottle rack. Not sure where I would put those 12 bottles but that just seems like such a waste of space to me.
    We decided to have our bottle rack custom made to accommodate a few 60 min., numerous 30 min. and then all the portable extinguishers. The top was low enough to hold fold tarps. This allowed us to "re-purpose" the wheel well areas for other tools. one has a speedy-dri hopper, one holds a portable electric winch, the third has a shelf and carries spare nozzles and stacked tips. We actually are happy with this as it ensures a single place to go for spare bottles. Of course what you'll carry and how you lay out the compartments is truly an dept. specific thing. All you can do is be aware of the options and innovations and select what will fit your FD best.

    Quote Originally Posted by FyredUp View Post
    6) Remote operated deluge gun. Eliminating climbing on top of the rig to operate it, OR mounted a ladder to make climbing up to operate out manual deluge gun safer and easier.
    Here we went in a totally different direction and opted for no mounted gun. So few times when this was a first water device coupled with our tower being owning the address, we opted for a portable gun (carried and a "blitzfire" style gun (preconnected). Our initial thought was also to go with a remote operated one for the same reasons you've noted, it came down to money, space and relative necessity.
    Quote Originally Posted by FyredUp View Post
    7) L-shaped water tank to lower the hose bed height.
    As Boxalarm187 notes, and I'm sure you're aware, the cubic footage doesn't change so the bed ends up either taller or longer for the same load. A short length bed may have a lower floor, but the stack height may end up back in the clouds. In the end we found we couldn't have our cake and eat it too, so we opted to allow the hose to rise up a bit and opted to ensure they could be deployed from the ground, but do require standing on the tailboard to reload. Our thought was we have more control of the conditions when reloading.
    Quote Originally Posted by FyredUp View Post
    8) Just for the coolness factor either a Roto-Ray or an 888 light front center cab.
    Hey, don't discount the effectiveness of them too. We get more comments from motorists and citizens about the Roto-ray, it gets noticed! BTW, we'd go back to halogen over the LED RR, the led just doesn't throw the light at all, it's bright straight on, but is lost at a small angle.
    Quote Originally Posted by FyredUp View Post
    10) A light tower. While the 1500 watt eyebrow light and the 4 corner body extenda lights work fine, being able to massively flood the scene with the light from a tower is hard to beat.
    Bingo! Once we got the light tower, anything else when operating an extrication seems terrible.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Weruj1 View Post
    Nice looking rig.
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    What you describe sounds very similar to our new rescue engine. You can see pics on 4Guy's website. Look for Honeoye Falls.

    We went for a vertical "alongside the tank" cmpt for ground ladders and hooks. A smaller one on the driver's side hold suction hose. They did that for us on the last engine they built for us, and we liked it. A pool ladder makes getting up top a hell of a lot easier and safer.

    The truck turned out to be kind of a beast, due to us needing a 1000 gal tank, 2000 ft of 5", and storage for all our extrication gear, water rescue gear, and the truck gear we routinely carry on all our engines. That's fine- we have a manueverable, short wheelbase pumper already- this was meant to be the war wagon!

    The remote control deck gun is a great option, and one we specced on both engines. Both for the safety bonus of not needing to climb up there to operate it, and from a manpower standpoint. We have a single career member on duty weekdays, and this makes it easier ( and more likely) for him to use that option by himself. We also added an extend-a-gun, so it could be stowed low- to keep it away from the many tree limbs- AND be able to use it over the cab.

    The engine also has a Foampro class A/B system and dual foam cells.

    This is also our second engine to place the crosslays on the front bumper. We have 2 1.75", but there is room to go with larger hose. The 2.5" is in the over the pump panel crosslay. Like you, this option has worked out well for us. We tend to lay in/ nose in, and have many narrow drives. Putting them there makes them far easier to stretch than traditional midship crosslays. Plus, since they are just above knee height, it isn't THAT hard to lift it up, and pull the hose strait forward. They are both individually plumbed, and both are piped for foam.

    We got the LFD version of the Spartan Gladiator, and there's a cmpt running the width of the cab under the rear forward facing seats.

    We've had very good experiences with 4Guys. They build a very good product, and are very flexible with options and customizations. Both of ours are stainless steel, being in the roadsalt belt.
    Last edited by Nozzle nut 22; 10-15-2013 at 02:04 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nozzle nut 22 View Post
    ....We also added an extend-a-gun, so it could be stowed low- to keep it away from the many tree limbs- AND be able to use it over the cab.
    ...
    Is there a remote version of the extend-a-gun or does the guy have to climb up to extend/lower the gun?
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

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    I believe it's controlled from the pump panel. It may not BE that brand, same idea though.
    we use Elkhart monitors. I can't imagine the thought process necessary to purchase a remote control deck gun- then pair it with a manual riser. Kinda defeats the whole purpose, huh?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nozzle nut 22 View Post
    ... Kinda defeats the whole purpose, huh?
    That was exactly my thought.


    but I have seen it done...
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

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    We just received our Rosenbauer Rescue Pumper. I will agree with what others have said the 12v LED Spectras are VERY impressive, we have four mounted on the body on pole (2 rear, 2 front) as well as 2 FRC Evolutions (15,000 lumens) on our Power Arc lightbar and they provide plenty of light.

    As for the deck gun, we also opted for a TFT Monsoon 2000gpm remote controlled deck gun. We have the extend-a-gun and on ours it is operated with the same remote as the deck gun.

    I will get some picture up later if i can.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FyredUp View Post
    Okay let's try this again!

    Talk to me about your rescue engine, or squad type engine, and the storage options you have used. You know shelving, slide out trays, drawers, ladder racks, hard suction, or something else that you innovated or "borrowed" from somewhere else.


    Just to give you an idea of what we would be carrying for equipment: Full engine equipment, extrication equipment, some truck equipment to include a PPV fan, saws, and additional hooks and axes. Also we are looking at a minimum of 1000 gallons of water, if not 1500. The pump would be a 2000 gpm with Class A foam. More than likely if the plan continues the front bumper will be for a preconnected 2 inch handline and a 2 1/2 inch line with a blitzfire.

    Thanks...
    FyredUp,

    Our Squad is a '02 Pierce Dash. It is a 2,250 GPM single stage pump, 1000 gallons of water, and A & B foam. 1,500' 5", total of 350' 1.75", 300' of 2", and 500' of 2.5", and deck gun. Ladder rack gives us more compartment space. We carry a full compliment of hooks, irons, extinguishers, hand tools, and chainsaw. Also carry vehicle rescue, low angle rope, and water rescue equipment.

    Irons, smaller hooks, TIC, gas meter and EMS supplies are mounted in the cab

    Hydraulic Ladder rack and longer hooks, and hard sleeves are kept up top

    Everything else is stored around all sides. Somehow it all fits on a 44,000 GVW 184" wheel base engine. I'll post some pictures to show how things are mounted.
    Last edited by Squad50FF; 10-19-2013 at 02:16 AM.

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    Here are pictures of our hydraulic tool configuration and the rig itself. I'll try to upload more.
    Attached Images Attached Images    

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    Hey Don One of Chuck's rigs is for sale, 4 Qs

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