1. #1
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    Default What are your thoughts about a modified P19 for contract engine work?

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    I have the opportunity to get one of these retired ARFF trucks. GVW 22,000lbs empty. 1k gallon water tank.

    All the specifications are on this paper I found online: http://ftpmirror.your.org/pub/wikime...8/P19_SG_1.pdf

    Assuming with some elbow grease and engineering it could be fitted with a lower pressure pump and other things to make it wildland friendly. Thoughts, questions?

    It could be used as a tender, structural protection, and what not and its 4x4. 8' Wide 27' Long

    Thanks,
    A
    Professional Firefighter/EMT-B

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    Have you driven one before??

    And if you are talking calif will it pass pollution regs??

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    Never driven one, smog wise I doubt it would as is. Been sick past week stuck on the couch so wheels are turning
    Professional Firefighter/EMT-B

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    how will you get this to different incidents? transport on a semi-trailer? it's not terribly fuel efficient for long hauls. Also you might consider looking into crash protection for Incident Helibases, I believe contracts are available for that
    "If you can't be a good example, the you'll just have to be a terrible warning."

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    I worked at a base that used one of our Amertek 2500L crash trucks as a brush engine. It worked fairly well, the 2500L is a bit smaller than the P19 though (660 gallons, 1000 gpm).

    Looking at the specs the P19 looks very capable off road as most crash trucks are. If you were looking at it as a brush truck for local use, if the price was right I'd say look into it.

    As a contract engine, I'm not so sure. I don't really think they were designed for long hauls down the highway, and in fact I'm not even sure they are street legal. Even if they are fuel and tires would be a budget killer, so I'm in agreement that you might need to look into a lowboy.

    Then there are the contract issues. While they leave a lot of room in the specs to allow different concepts in engines, there are limits. Before you buy it, I would look very carefully to see where it would fit. I'm guessing it would best be considered a Type 4 engine, although Type 3 would probably be an option.

    Obviously contracting as a crash truck for a large helibase would be a good fit, but that doesn't seem to happen a lot. I can count on one hand the number of times I've seen a real crash truck in helibase, and I think that was usually due to being close to a military base who offered to send it than anything else.

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    Before you go nuts tearing this thing apart to change the pump you really should either find someone close to you that knows how they work, or do some research. Because frankly it is unnecessary.
    Crazy, but that's how it goes
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    Quote Originally Posted by RangerJake72 View Post
    how will you get this to different incidents? transport on a semi-trailer? it's not terribly fuel efficient for long hauls. Also you might consider looking into crash protection for Incident Helibases, I believe contracts are available for that
    Ranger Jake is dead on -the mileage pay on contract engine work is barely break even on a little type 6. Unless they pay big bucks mileage on a large engine, not only will you lose $, but you will be beat to death when you get to the fire.
    ?

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    thanks for the input guys. Seems like it would be for the most part a money pit or a great rig for a dept with a lot of flat land and brush. It would be fun though!

    I'll find an old Crown to scratch my itch
    Professional Firefighter/EMT-B

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