Like Tree4Likes

Thread: Rescue Apparatus

  1. #1
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    3

    Default Rescue Apparatus

    Our department is wanting a rescue rig for extricatio, but wevwould really like to have water on it like 300 gallons or so. Whst is our best option?

  2. #2
    Forum Member
    FWDbuff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Pee-Ayy!
    Posts
    7,401

    Default

    Uhhhhhhh......spec a rescue rig for extrication with 300 gallons of water and a pump on it?
    "Loyalty Above all Else. Except Honor."

  3. #3
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    2,012

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FWDbuff View Post
    Uhhhhhhh......spec a rescue rig for extrication with 300 gallons of water and a pump on it?
    zing --------------
    ?

  4. #4
    Let's talk fire trucks!
    BoxAlarm187's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    3,311

    Default

    Yeah, not to be blunt, but spec with a 300 gallon tank and a 125 to 500 GPM pump, depending on your needs. Take a look at the new rescue that Mechanicsville, MD just took delivery of it you want to see a VERY compact pump panel that still allows a lot of room.
    Career Fire Captain
    Volunteer Chief Officer


    Never taking for granted that I'm privileged enough to have the greatest job in the world!

  5. #5
    Forum Member
    Bones42's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    Pt. Beach, NJ
    Posts
    10,676

    Default

    or spec a rescue engine....serve 2 roles.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

  6. #6
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    85

    Default

    Get a mini pumper plain and simple!

  7. #7

  8. #8
    Let's talk fire trucks!
    BoxAlarm187's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    3,311

    Default

    I have to politely disagree with the previous two posters. If you've indentified that this going simply going to be a rescue with a small pump-and-tanker capability, you probably don't need all of the features of a rescue-pumper (less comparment space, hosebed, crosslays, etc). A mini-pumper is going to require you have to a second driver, another vehicle on the insurance policy, another vehicle to maintain, etc.

    I've seen a great number of rescues with pumps and tanks (heck, we have three here at work) which can still be a very effective rescue without compromising the overall mission of the vehicle.
    Career Fire Captain
    Volunteer Chief Officer


    Never taking for granted that I'm privileged enough to have the greatest job in the world!

  9. #9
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Bossier Parrish, Louisiana
    Posts
    10,592

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SuperFire123 View Post
    Get a mini pumper plain and simple!
    Most mini-pumpers that I have come across are severely overloaded when you combine even the most basic level of suppression equipment with rescue equipment.

    Getting a mini-pumper for that type of duty is generally not the answer.
    Train to fight the fires you fight.

  10. #10
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    2,012

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LaFireEducator View Post
    Most mini-pumpers that I have come across are severely overloaded when you combine even the most basic level of suppression equipment with rescue equipment.

    Getting a mini-pumper for that type of duty is generally not the answer.
    finally something we can agree on ---- hey maybe some day I can beat out fyredup being your BFF
    CaptOldTimer likes this.
    ?

  11. #11
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    3

    Default

    Here is what we are discussing because it is similar to our brush units.
    http://www.chieffire-safety.com/gallery
    It is one for Hale City Fire Dept. Next to last row first column.

  12. #12
    Let's talk fire trucks!
    BoxAlarm187's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    3,311

    Default

    Well that's about $500,000 less than what I thought you were talking about. If you're going to use something like that as a rescue, be very aware of the weight capacities of the body, rear axle, and chassis, especially if you're going to have a pump and tank on it.
    Career Fire Captain
    Volunteer Chief Officer


    Never taking for granted that I'm privileged enough to have the greatest job in the world!

  13. #13
    Forum Member
    FyredUp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 1999
    Location
    Rural Wisconsin, Retired from the burbs of Milwaukee
    Posts
    10,028

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by slackjawedyokel View Post
    finally something we can agree on ---- hey maybe some day I can beat out fyredup being your BFF
    You can have him, I won't fight you for him...
    Crazy, but that's how it goes
    Millions of people living as foes
    Maybe it's not too late
    To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

  14. #14
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    2,012

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FyredUp View Post
    You can have him, I won't fight you for him...
    dang ---you're too easy.
    ?

  15. #15
    Forum Member
    FWDbuff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Pee-Ayy!
    Posts
    7,401

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DHVansickle View Post
    Here is what we are discussing because it is similar to our brush units.
    http://www.chieffire-safety.com/gallery
    It is one for Hale City Fire Dept. Next to last row first column.
    Now the question remains- how much extrication equipment do you want to put on it? You start loading that chassis up with a body, a pump, 300 gallons of water and then throw on hose and equipment- yer gonna overload it. Keep the future in mind, too. Will you ever put anything else on it? Personally I would upgrade to a small rescue/squad style pumper.
    "Loyalty Above all Else. Except Honor."

  16. #16
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    2,012

    Default

    I have heard the term "Velcro effect" thrown around. I think that especially applies to rescues. Not only will you want to throw on more of the "neat stuff" you find, but your department may take on more responsibilities and thereby more equipment.
    ?

  17. #17
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    3

    Default

    We have 2 jaws, 1 spreader, pump, gererator, and then just small stuff (axes and hand tools).

  18. #18
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    2,012

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DHVansickle View Post
    We have 2 jaws, 1 spreader, pump, gererator, and then just small stuff (axes and hand tools).
    But what will you have 5 years from now ?
    FWDbuff and backsteprescue123 like this.
    ?

  19. #19
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    85

    Default

    This truck with some upgrades could fill your needs for a number of years.
    http://www.fentonfire.com/mini__midi...g.php?lid=5110

  20. #20
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    3

    Default

    Some manufacturers offer a High pressure or Ultra high pressure system that requires little space and little water to handle any car fires. If this is what the intention was for car fire use, this may be an option for you.

  21. #21
    Forum Member
    FyredUp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 1999
    Location
    Rural Wisconsin, Retired from the burbs of Milwaukee
    Posts
    10,028

    Default

    Call me a crumudgeon but I have never met a mini-pumper that I didn't learn to hate. The problem is, and my #2 POC FD is a perfect example of this, they are almost always grossly overloaded. The FD buys a mini-pumper with the idea that it will be light and mobile with off road capability and the next thing you know it has 6 scba, spare bottles, extrication equipment, 2 crosslays, a deckgun, 1000 feet of LDH, and eventually almost the same equipment as on the full size pumper. There goes any thought of light and mobile.

    You can put me in the category of non-believer when it comes to high pressure fog too. Buy a real pump capable of at least 200 gpm so you can put 2 real handlines on the ground if necessary.

    Buy at least a medium duty chassis, with more capacity for equipment than you currently possess. You will be absolutely amazed at the equipment that will almost magically appear to fill the rig over the next couple of years.
    Crazy, but that's how it goes
    Millions of people living as foes
    Maybe it's not too late
    To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

  22. #22
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    252

    Cool

    I agree, do not go with a Ford, Dodge, or GM 1 ton chassis, if you are going to carry 300 gallons of water & rescue equipment. Take a look at the Medium chassis that are available from E-one or some other company in your area. I have seen a real nice rig on the Foutsfire.com web site called the CJ series rescue pumper at a very good price !

  23. #23
    Forum Member
    FFWALT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Nebraska
    Posts
    357

    Default

    If you have a chance to spec a rescue (wet or dry) really take a look at how you are operating and how you want to operate. Our department had this opportunity in the late 90's. We were looking at a F series and that would handle the weight but the cubic space was larger than practical on that chassis. We ended up with a Freightliner FL112 with a 16 foot walk around body. We also included 300 gallons of water, foam and a pump run off of the Allison PTO port.

    Rescue 1 was put into service in 2000 and for at least the first 8 years we used the pump at least once each year. It's not enough to fight a significant fire but if you make a lot of foam it will buy you time until the cavalry (tanker or engine) arrives.

    When this apparatus was put into service we were able to operate off of the right side and the rear which was ideal for a blocking position. We also had a lot of space. Fast forward about 10 years and we were trying to maximize space and not everything that was routinely used remained on the right side.

    The other posters are correct, spec the truck with water, pump and foam. On this type of apparatus I lean towards a pump run off of the transmission PTO port. A 250 gpm pump would be plenty. Also take a hard look at where and how you will carry your attack line. A friend and I often debate how to design the ideal apparatus (regardless of type). He had one of the better ideas I've heard for a rescue trucks attack line, put it in the tailboard. Overall out of the way, easy to deploy, easy to deploy and doesn't take up compartment space. Just something to consider.

    If you can design a rescue apparatus, really take the time to do it right and plan for the future. Rescue apparatus suffer from the "Velcro effect" more than most types of apparatus. Really consider how you will recharge batteries, how you will operate at a scene and the possibility of more than one scene on each call. By this I mean a vehicle in each ditch.

    Hope this helps. Let me know if you have questions or need clarification.

    Walt
    RangerJake72 likes this.
    Train like you want to fight.
    www.kvfd.net

  24. #24
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    1,158

    Default

    Try looking at a compressed air CAFS system. You just have the water tank with foam concentrate in it, a 1" reel, and SCUBA tanks. Great for vehicle fires. You can go with a 100 gallon tank and still have more more extinguishing capability than 300 gallons of plain water.

  25. #25
    Forum Member
    SFD_E73_RET's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    KC area
    Posts
    302

    Default

    Here is an example of what johnsb is talking about on Mulvane Fire & Rescue's new Toyne Rescue:

    http://www.mulvaneemergencyservices..../IMG_1950e.jpg

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Rescue apparatus
    By rsoup72 in forum Specialized Rescue
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 06-19-2012, 08:37 AM
  2. New Rescue Apparatus
    By rsoup72 in forum Apparatus Innovation
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 05-13-2012, 10:59 PM
  3. interface/rescue apparatus ?
    By slackjawedyokel in forum Apparatus Innovation
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 10-10-2011, 08:22 PM
  4. Rescue Apparatus
    By Casey903 in forum Specialized Rescue
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 05-04-2009, 11:05 PM
  5. Rescue Apparatus
    By ARFF2/66 in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-10-2001, 01:30 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Log in

Click here to log in or register