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Thread: ARFF Start Up

  1. #1
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    Default ARFF Start Up

    Hi- looking for help. I am middle management line officer on shift. Readers' digest version: We are getting ready to start responding at our airport; yet we are a year out from the station being built. We will be going to the airport and sitting there in the crash truck (when it gets delivered in mean time in a reserve truck w/ foam) while the airplanes are landing. Expecting regional commuter jets such as Airbus 319/ MD80 by end of the year, 2-3 days a week. We are a rural/suburban dept with limited personnel; and approx a year ago they gave us the IFSTA book and said "learn this" and then we took a test on it and most of us passed. We have the FAA 139 ARFF codes; I am looking for SOP/SOGs for a small commuter type airport operation that might be similar to ours or any kind of guidance as to what questions to present to admin. Thanks much for any help.

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    Contact Dallas Fort Worth Airport FD Training, they should be a valuable resource for you.

    http://www.dfwairport.com/firetraining/index.php

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    Wow- that's really nice- thanks for the info!

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    Go here. You are looking at a minimum of an INDEX C. Facility. Look at the bottom link for Index info and required equipment. A reserve engine with 25 Gallons of Foam ain't gonna make it. The AIRPORT/FAA is responsible for the equipment. Sounds like you guys are going to provide the staffing. Do not take on this on without the AIRPORT/AUTHORITY giving you the Means (MONEY) to meet the requirements.

    (c) Index C. Either of the following:

    (1) Three vehicles—

    (i) One vehicle carrying the extinguishing agents as specified in paragraph (a)(1) or (a)(2) of this section; and

    (ii) Two vehicles carrying an amount of water and the commensurate quantity of AFFF so the total quantity of water for foam production carried by all three vehicles is at least 3,000 gallons.

    (2) Two vehicles—

    (i) One vehicle carrying the extinguishing agents as specified in paragraph (b)(1) of this section; and

    (ii) One vehicle carrying water and the commensurate quantity of AFFF so the total quantity of water for foam production carried by both vehicles is at least 3,000 gallons.






    http://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/retrieve...0.1.1.14.4.3.8

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    Also this. Aircraft Data


    BOEING 737

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boeing_737_Next_Generation

    MD 80

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/McDonnell_Douglas_MD-80

    AIRBUS

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Airbus_A320_family



    You're talking up to a potential 124+ Souls on board and up to 11,000 Gallons of JET A. You ready for that?

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    Got all this stuff on the 139 and requirements. We are class 1/index B. Looking for specifically SOG/SOP on things like:
    - if plane coming in w hot brakes drive to point A, wait for AC to call and then go to point B and pull this line/do this with the truck
    - if plane coming in no landing gear down, drive here, wait for plane to crash then do XYZ
    - if plane crashes and bodies are everywhere, call XYZ for temp morgue, stage ambulances here, call mutual aid based on X# victims......................
    that's the kind of stuff. Does that exist for anyone? (and no we are not ready but not really being given a chance. grrrrrr.)

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    We are a Class II/Index A airport. We were recently Class I, and provide Index B protection.

    A lot of what you may be looking for should be included in the Airport Emergency Plan, which all Part 139 airports are requried to have and keep updated.

    Many airports utilize a Alert I/II/III system, or something similar. For us it goes like this:

    Alert I - Aircraft with minor difficulty/problem (ex. fluctuating oil press, etc.)
    We stage on the apron of the fire house, geared up, trucks running.

    Alert II - Aircraft with major difficulty/problem (Fire indication, gear failure, engine failure, etc.)
    We stage apparatus near the runway to be used. If one truck, stage at the midpoint on a parallel taxiway. If multiple apparatus available will stage at multiple points along the runway. As the aircraft passes a vehicle's location, that vehicle will pursue the aircraft.

    Alert III - Aircraft accident
    Proceed immediately to aircraft scene, and do what we do!

    We also have Alert IV - Other emergency, usually reserved for medicals on board, that kind of thing.

    Now in answer to your specific questions:

    Hot brakes: If no fire, we will usually have the aircraft stop remotely and allow to cool on their own. Chock the nose gear and have the aircraft leave the parking brake off. Fans may be used, but their benefit is one of those great industrial debates. If there is fire, apply water to extinguish, protect the fuselage and aircraft wing (full of fuel!). Always be aware of the dangers from fuseable plugs releasing, and the potential for tires and rims to blow apart.

    No landing gear: Stage units as defined for Alert II. Use water/foam to cool the belly of the aircraft as needed. Be aware of occupants evacuating and look for possible fuel leaks.

    End of the world crash: We activate our county's mass casualty plan, which will net us more equipment and personnel to triage and transport. We have hangars and other airport buildings designated as temp morgues, triage, staging areas.
    RangerJake72 likes this.

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    Default more like it

    Ok, thanks this is more like what I am looking for. I have the AEP and 14 CFR 139 etc. These are the kind of things I need. Anything even more specific would be great (ie how far to stage away from AC, angle of approach if its generalized) need an ACTIVE SHOOTER on premises too. I am to guess by now and my research that the Alert I-IV is a industry wide designation on terminology? Also what do y'all do for daily training? I did just get the revised draft on training from FAA. thanks!

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    Most approaches to the aircraft will at angles to either the nose or tail depending on the situation. Remember the main idea is to be able to protect the fuselage and its occupants, or to protect the exits so the occupants have time and a place to evacuate.

    As for active shooter, I would work with local law enforcement on that type of thing. As ARFF or EMS, your role will be likely be picking up the pieces once the LEOs have secured the scene.

    Alert I-IV designations are common, although not necessarily industry wide. I know of airports that use numbers, letters, box alarms, and may have dozens of different possible alarms depending on the needs of the facility. For an airport your size (I'm guessing fairly similar to ours), I would keep it simple until you find a need that it doesn't meet.

    For training we use videos and ppts a lot. You can also perform timed response drills. It is nice to do the drills unexpectedly to measure actual performance versus the crews knowing its coming and being ready. We also have the remains of a small Piper (don't worry, it was bought from a scrapper) that we set up and practice approaches, stabilization, etc.

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    Default thanks

    ok that's good. we visited an airport similar to what ours will be yesterday and got lots more info. I am concerned about how we will get calls since we are non-towered airspace. ANy experience with that?

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    RLogan,
    Did you get an actual ARFF certification from the test you took? Who is the certification through? IFSAC, NPQ, or your state? Are you purchasing ARFF bunker gear? That's another sticky subject.

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    Question

    Yes, we did get a state certificate and they stated they were sending in our NPQ. However, we have to burn again now since it's been over a year. 2 Guys per shift got proximity gear. I had submitted a list of questions recently and recieved quite vague answers so far. Cant elaborate more than that in public post. Still concerned about the non-controlled airspace, as well as diverted flights and emergency landings......................

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    Give DFW a call

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    RLogan, most of the things you are asking for are dependent on local conditions. If you ask FDNY about how they conduct VES, you'll get a different answer than if you ask a rural department. If you only have two FFs in prox gear, then you're not doing much beyond vehicle based firefighting anyway. Approaches, runway position, etc will be dependent on the layout of your airfield.

    Your organizational challenges should take precedence right now. If your guys passed the ARFF cert, you should know how to handle hot brakes and basic emergencies. You have to get answers on maintaining your training and establishing communications. You can't really build your local SOPs until you have the training or experience to know what you need, and it sounds like you aren't getting the support for your training.

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    might check this podcast for any help

    also another contact for info::

    http://www.firehouse.com/podcast/109...ue-emergencies

    how about a trip to some nearby airports for help?

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    also check here for some lesson plans or info

    http://feti.lsu.edu/trade/index.php

    put airport, aircraft, foam in the search

    and any other words you can think of

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    Quote Originally Posted by RLogan View Post
    ok that's good. we visited an airport similar to what ours will be yesterday and got lots more info. I am concerned about how we will get calls since we are non-towered airspace. ANy experience with that?
    We are also a non-towered airport. There are several ways through which we are notified of calls. I'm assuming you will only be providing coverage 15 minutes before and after the handful of air carrier operations you mentioned you will be having versus continuous coverage.

    1. We monitor our UNICOM/CTAF, airline company, emergency, and approach control frequencies and actually watch the aircraft operations while providing ARFF coverage for our commercial flights. We will likely be the first to know.

    2. Our FBO (Fixed Base Operator) will call us if they are informed of an emergency during periods we may not be monitoring operations.

    3. The airport admin office has one of the best vantage points on the airfield, as close to a tower as we get, and will notify us via cell phone of any emergencies they become aware of.

    4. We as the airport have contacted the Center that provides approach control for our airport and gave them the 24 hour contact duty phone number so that they can reach us directly in the event they know of an emergency.

    The biggest thing is having to take a more active role in monitoring airfield operations instead of being dependent on the tower to call out all alerts.

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