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Thread: Starting Firefighter I

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    Default Starting Firefighter I

    I start FFI next week and was just wondering if you guys had any advice for me. I plan to study hard, train hard, and keep my mouth shut. Any other advice would be appreciated. Is FFI a good balance between classroom work as well as hands on work? Also, many say FFI touches on basic things but i was wondering if they go in depth in Engine & Truck work, if so, how far could i expect it to be in depth? Thanks in advance stay safe.

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    I tell all of my students.....read the book. Read all of the book. Picture captions, highlights, footnotes, etc.

    In NJ, the standard hands-on is Ok. The test is written by the book. You will not get all the material in class by lectures, so without reading the book....you will be a bit shorted.


    ps - once the course is done....learn what your FD actually does. You may find it quite a bit different than the standard FF1 course.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

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    I have already read chapters 1-4 and plan to read a few more before i start FFI. I want to gain as much knowledge as i can i feel reading the book alot and efficiently will be very good.

    I have been told some things in my FD may be different so that will also be something i must learn as well.

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    If you are not in excellent physical condition, get that way.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FDEngine View Post
    I have already read chapters 1-4 and plan to read a few more before i start FFI. I want to gain as much knowledge as i can i feel reading the book alot and efficiently will be very good.

    I have been told some things in my FD may be different so that will also be something i must learn as well.

    If you are not learning your whole firefighter career either something is wrong with you or your department.

    Enjoy, the academy is just and appetizer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FF-Andy View Post
    If you are not in excellent physical condition, get that way.
    I am in good shape. Always trying to get in even better shape as well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by fire49 View Post
    If you are not learning your whole firefighter career either something is wrong with you or your department.

    Enjoy, the academy is just and appetizer.
    I agree with you Bones. Thank you

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    Quote Originally Posted by FDEngine View Post
    I start FFI next week and was just wondering if you guys had any advice for me. I plan to study hard, train hard, and keep my mouth shut. Any other advice would be appreciated. Is FFI a good balance between classroom work as well as hands on work? Also, many say FFI touches on basic things but i was wondering if they go in depth in Engine & Truck work, if so, how far could i expect it to be in depth? Thanks in advance stay safe.
    Review everything from your basic firefighter. I do not know exactly how it is where you live but here everything that was on our basic firefighter was also testable for our firefighter one. In fact I believe it was probably about half the test.

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    "I start FFI next week and was just wondering if you guys had any advice for me. I plan to study hard, train hard, and keep my mouth shut."

    That just about covers everything, except if you have a question, ask it.

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    Going through our academy right now for FFI and FFII. So far we are half way and 90%has been FFI. More the the next few months will touch more on FFII areas but the bulk is the same with just a bit more detail or technical things. As far as being in the best physical condition I can say for a fact it will help you but if you are not it shouldn't stop you. I am one of the bigger guys in our class at 5'10" and 280. With all the drills we have done i have been able to do everything just as good if not better as the fit guys. This past weekend we had guys that couldnt get thru a wall with studs 16 on center in full turn outs w/SCBA. I went thru a spot that was 13 on center. It all comes down to how hard you want to try and how hard you push yourself.

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    Buy yourself some one inch diameter rope. Need two three foot sections.

    Practice (with your bunker gloves on), your knots with these two practice ropes.

    Its not easy to tie knots with thick ropes, with bunker gear gloves on, but you have to learn it that way.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jvanorder View Post
    Going through our academy right now for FFI and FFII. So far we are half way and 90%has been FFI. More the the next few months will touch more on FFII areas but the bulk is the same with just a bit more detail or technical things. As far as being in the best physical condition I can say for a fact it will help you but if you are not it shouldn't stop you. I am one of the bigger guys in our class at 5'10" and 280. With all the drills we have done i have been able to do everything just as good if not better as the fit guys. This past weekend we had guys that couldnt get thru a wall with studs 16 on center in full turn outs w/SCBA. I went thru a spot that was 13 on center. It all comes down to how hard you want to try and how hard you push yourself.
    Jvanorder, I say this in peace; not wagging my finger at you. K?

    I am not coming at you in a "big me, little you" or even with an assinine tone of voice. Try to take this as a big brother would advise a younger one. First of all, congrats on getting on the roof and being able to squeeze yourself thru confined spaces. Lots of attrition due to heights and confined spaces.

    Now, lets talk about fitness for a second. I harp on fitness not for the class, but for what the fire ground will present to you once you graduate class. I literally just walked back in my office after fighting a house fire for two solid hours with a crew of six. No breaks. My clothes are soaked in sweat and its less than 30 degrees outside. That's daytime firefighting in a volunteer setting for ya. ALWAYS undermanned. Always. Heart attack city at 5'10" 280 pounds. Heat stroke city at 280 pounds, ESPECIALLY if you push yourself as your posts have indicated. The heat alone will fatigue you badly, let alone dragging hoses, running saws, pulling ceilings, etc, etc, etc.

    Your posts indicate a strong desire to be good at this. Please do your family, yourself and your brotherhood a solid and get as fit as you possibly can.

    Again, I'm not trying to be a ******. I hope you don't take it that way.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FIRE117 View Post
    Buy yourself some one inch diameter rope. Need two three foot sections.

    Practice (with your bunker gloves on), your knots with these two practice ropes.

    Its not easy to tie knots with thick ropes, with bunker gear gloves on, but you have to learn it that way.
    My instructors have told us already we will need to get rope and we will practice it all the time.

    Everything has gone pretty well so far I am still getting used to donning and doffing with gloves on as well as performing other tasks it's not easy but I'm sure the more practice the better I will get. Wearing my face piece and doing drills on air has helped me get acclimated to being on air and getting used to it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FF-Andy View Post
    Jvanorder, I say this in peace; not wagging my finger at you. K?

    I am not coming at you in a "big me, little you" or even with an assinine tone of voice. Try to take this as a big brother would advise a younger one. First of all, congrats on getting on the roof and being able to squeeze yourself thru confined spaces. Lots of attrition due to heights and confined spaces.

    Now, lets talk about fitness for a second. I harp on fitness not for the class, but for what the fire ground will present to you once you graduate class. I literally just walked back in my office after fighting a house fire for two solid hours with a crew of six. No breaks. My clothes are soaked in sweat and its less than 30 degrees outside. That's daytime firefighting in a volunteer setting for ya. ALWAYS undermanned. Always. Heart attack city at 5'10" 280 pounds. Heat stroke city at 280 pounds, ESPECIALLY if you push yourself as your posts have indicated. The heat alone will fatigue you badly, let alone dragging hoses, running saws, pulling ceilings, etc, etc, etc.

    Your posts indicate a strong desire to be good at this. Please do your family, yourself and your brotherhood a solid and get as fit as you possibly can.

    Again, I'm not trying to be a ******. I hope you don't take it that way.
    I 1000% agree with this advice having been on that side of the scale. I am also 5' 10" and have weighed as much as 275 during my time in the fire service. After whipping myself into better shape it is amazing how much weight is literally lifted off your shoulders working on a fire scene. At the end of the day you want to be able to do this job as safe as possible and make it back home to your family. I know I can do this job better now then I was at a heavier weight. I hope you do get in the best shape possible because it seems like you have everything needed to suceed as a firefighter. Stay safe.
    jvanorder likes this.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FF-Andy View Post
    Jvanorder, I say this in peace; not wagging my finger at you. K?

    I am not coming at you in a "big me, little you" or even with an assinine tone of voice. Try to take this as a big brother would advise a younger one. First of all, congrats on getting on the roof and being able to squeeze yourself thru confined spaces. Lots of attrition due to heights and confined spaces.

    Now, lets talk about fitness for a second. I harp on fitness not for the class, but for what the fire ground will present to you once you graduate class. I literally just walked back in my office after fighting a house fire for two solid hours with a crew of six. No breaks. My clothes are soaked in sweat and its less than 30 degrees outside. That's daytime firefighting in a volunteer setting for ya. ALWAYS undermanned. Always. Heart attack city at 5'10" 280 pounds. Heat stroke city at 280 pounds, ESPECIALLY if you push yourself as your posts have indicated. The heat alone will fatigue you badly, let alone dragging hoses, running saws, pulling ceilings, etc, etc, etc.

    Your posts indicate a strong desire to be good at this. Please do your family, yourself and your brotherhood a solid and get as fit as you possibly can.

    Again, I'm not trying to be a ******. I hope you don't take it that way.
    I feel you 100% And since joining the dept in June I have shed 20 pounds. Between work family and the academy I have not been able to hit the gym as much as I was this fall so Im holding steady where Im at. Right now my main focus has been getting thru the academy. Like I said in my post just because you are a bit bigger doesnt mean you have to sit on the sidelines. I have earned a tn of respect from the others in the class along with all the instructors and firefighters from across our county that we mutual aid with because I have the stones to be able to do everything else just as well as the rest of the class and with less whining. Once the academy is done my main focus is going to shift to better health. Also I am in no way offended by anything you have to say my skin is just as thick as the rest of me.

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